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http://gmauthority.com/blog/2018/10/chevrolet-volt-outdoes-epa-estimated-fuel-economy-figures-video/amp/

The slogan “your mileage may vary,” rings most true when it comes to plug-in hybrids and electric cars. Many conditions factor into how the cars perform on the fuel economy side of things, and it’s no different for the 2018 Chevrolet Volt.

YouTube channel “Fuel Economy” tested a 2018 Chevrolet Volt to see if its EPA-estimated ratings of 53 miles electric and 42 MPG were on par for the compact plug-in hybrid. In the right conditions, the Volt surpassed them with ease.

The tester began the week of fuel economy tests with a full charge and full tank of gasoline. The estimated EV range sat at 56 miles and gasoline range sat at 312 miles. No re-charging or re-fueling was done during the week-long test, and the results showed the Volt went 62 miles on a single charge and 196 miles when operating the gasoline engine in hybrid mode. Total, the car went 259 miles without refueling or re-charging.

Our host said re-charging the battery would cost around $1.40 CAD, or just over $1 USD, and filling the tank after burning through half of its fuel cost him $19.50 CAD. At $2.50 per gallon on average in the U.S., topping off the Volt would cost about $10. The cost savings are on full display here.

And this was without charging the Volt after running it to a depleted battery. Obviously, most owners plug their Volts in every day to have a full charge at all times. From personal experience, I haven’t used a drop of gasoline since July for a lengthy trip to the lake. That is, until the Volt kicks on the gasoline engine for mandatory “engine maintenance” to burn fuel after going unused for so long.

The Volt’s electric range truly is a “guess-o-meter” most days. Many factors go into extending the range or depleting it quicker. Colder temperatures, driving downhill more often and running the air conditioning or heat will all play havoc with the estimated range. Again, from personal experience, I’ve seen my estimated range climb as high as 72 miles in the dead of summer, and as low as 25 miles in below-freezing temperatures.
 

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Chevrolet tends to under rate their vehicles, so I'm not surpised the Volt is more efficient than the EPA estimates in many situations.
 

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The youtube-fuel-economy-channel reviewer drove 316km (196.3 miles) on ICE using 15.3L (4.04 gallons) or 48.6 miles/gallon. The reviewer's Volt mpg rating seems realistic for average driving speeds of 60miles/hour in mild weather. The Volt's ICE mpg has a pretty steep sensitivity to velocity and would drop to 39mpg at 75mph interstate speeds.

Once thing I've started to appreciate is the engineering marvel of the gen2 drive train. The gen2 excels at maximizing efficiency in city driving. Both the gasoline engine and the battery do their best in city driving. Since the batteries 50-60 mile range covers of all of my local driving, most of my gasoline is burned at interstate speeds.

Thursday, I was doing a mixture of Highway and City driving using the internal combustion engine. It was fun to watch the energy flow animation screen showing the power flowing directly to the wheels at highway speeds; occasionally overflowing into the battery when you go downhill or decelerate. At lower speeds, the excess engine power is always flowing into the battery unless our're accelerating in which case the battery and the engine are driving the wheels. Every time you brake, the regen flows into the battery too. Once the batteries builds up, the gasoline engine cuts off and for awhile the battery drives the wheels all by itself just like in EV mode ... really cool stuff. The technology inside this car is amazing in EV mode, but its actually coolest in hybrid mode.
 
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