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Hello, I have a 2018 Volt. I am being sent to Ireland on assignment with my vehicle. It seems house plug and charging station voltage is within acceptable range 230v, and I do see various J1772 to IEC 62196 adapters for sale, but I am concerned about my vehicle accepting a charge at 50 hertz (which is what their power grid runs at). Will a US model Volt accept a charge at 230v/50hz? And if so, is it safe?

I can't get a straight answer from GM on that question.

Are there any other concerns I am missing?
 

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Hello, I have a 2018 Volt. I am being sent to Ireland on assignment with my vehicle. It seems house plug and charging station voltage is within acceptable range 230v, and I do see various J1772 to IEC 62196 adapters for sale, but I am concerned about my vehicle accepting a charge at 50 hertz (which is what their power grid runs at). Will a US model Volt accept a charge at 230v/50hz? And if so, is it safe?

I can't get a straight answer from GM on that question.

Are there any other concerns I am missing?
Interestingly, the user manual specifies only 120V and 240V for charging, and gives expected currents. There was no mention of frequency. However, we also know the Volt is quite happy on 208V.

The J1772 standard requires EVSE to advertise to the vehicle how much current it can deliver, and the vehicle to limit what it draws to no more than that.

In other words, the Volts charger is very agile. I suspect it will handle 50Hz in stride. Especially if it maintains a high power factor (makes the funky electronic load known as a charger appear to be a simple resistive load, like a heater or incandescent light bulb.) i.e. its a universal input power converter (100-250VAC, 50-60Hz).

I think all North America is 60Hz. It would be unusual for a N.A. vehicle to end up on another continent.

Half of Japan is 50Hz, half 60Hz, both about 100V (and possibly 200/208/240V). Are there Volts there?
 

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IIRC, both the Volt and the Ampera were manufactured on the same line. To keep costs to a minimum, it would be logical to design the electronics to work on both 50 and 60 Hertz. Perhaps you can research the part numbers of the chargers used in both the Volt and the Ampera (I'm NOT talking about the EVSE which colloquially is referred to as the charger.) If they are the same, I would believe that the charger was designed for either frequency.

Can anyone help with the part numbers for Subaru2915?

EDIT: My bad. You have a Gen 2. No Gen 2 Amperas were manufactured, only Gen 1.
 

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I suspect the 50 Hz question is the least of your worries. Aren't there a bunch of bureaucratic hurdles to importing a car, such as meeting special/different requirements for headlights and other lights, emergency equipment carried on board, documenting emissions characteristics, and probably other things? I think there was a previous discussion on this forum about it. It was a different European country, maybe Finland, so there may be a different set of issues. It seemed like the easier option was to buy a car locally.
 

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I'd be more concerned about driving a RHD vehicle on LHD roads -- specially in Ireland. Those lanes are REALLY narrow once you get off a M-Road.

Why not just set it here and purchase overthere?
 

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I

I think all North America is 60Hz. It would be unusual for a N.A. vehicle to end up on another continent.

Half of Japan is 50Hz, half 60Hz, both about 100V (and possibly 200/208/240V). Are there Volts there?
North American vehicles end up in Europe all the time. Our military personal take them over with them.
 

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Consider posting your question to this forum (which is UK-based).
 

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Consider posting your question to this forum (which is UK-based).
If any of you out there want to see what GM-Volt is going to look like after the forum software upgrade, click on this link that css28 has provided. It's VERY different from what we're used to.
 

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Oh, there are some Gen 2 Volts for sale in Europe right now. I am not aware any modifications needed to the charging system. It should just work with a correct EU-type EVSE.
 

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Hello, I have a 2018 Volt. I am being sent to Ireland on assignment with my vehicle. It seems house plug and charging station voltage is within acceptable range 230v, and I do see various J1772 to IEC 62196 adapters for sale, but I am concerned about my vehicle accepting a charge at 50 hertz (which is what their power grid runs at). Will a US model Volt accept a charge at 230v/50hz? And if so, is it safe?

I can't get a straight answer from GM on that question.

Are there any other concerns I am missing?
I can’t imagine that the 50 cycles factor means a thing, to charging your car.
As I recall, it only affects things like A/C clocks & turntables, that don’t have a switch for that, like the voltage switch.
You’ll be just fine.
 

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I agree that it probably won't matter.

Your concerns would be justified if there were a transformer on the input since it would be designed for a specific frequency. The slower 50Hz would potentially saturate the core and cause it to overheat. However with modern switch-mode electronics, I can almost guarantee that there's not a 5kVA transformer in the car, it would be too heavy and bulky and it wouldn't accomplish anything since the batteries need DC to charge.

Simplified, I would bet that the input stage immediately rectifies the incoming power (so voltage/frequency immediately means nothing) and then it's boosted to a regulated DC voltage that the battery charging circuity needs (around 360 V?). However, if the input power is too far out of range, there's probably some measurements the car takes to verify the EVSE claims about voltage/current to protect itself.
 

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Simplified, I would bet that the input stage immediately rectifies the incoming power (so voltage/frequency immediately means nothing) and then it's boosted to a regulated DC voltage that the battery charging circuity needs (around 360 V?).
You have just described how a power factor correction circuit functions. This also describes the input to a universal input power supply.
 
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