GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Interesting article in today's WSJ Real Estate section (click here). Maybe our Copper Mountain Snowboarder will want to move East after reading the last few paragraphs! When we remodeled and build a new detached garage here, I wired it with a 240V 50A circuit "just because," figuring we'd use it for a dedicated air compressor or welder. Actually, before the Blessed Event (Volt purchase), we only used it to power an electric kiln that we use for crafts here in the country at "Grandparent Camp!"

The PV system was installed to take the edge off our power bill that reaches embarrassing heights in wintertime with lots of square feet, baseboard heat, electric water heat and hot tub, and with net metering, it seems to have at least "zeroed" out our bills. As a retired electric utility executive, I was unable to go over to the "dark side" (i.e., demand side conservation), and continued on my central station power plant development trajectory and boosted the supply side here. Then I read about the Volt and the federal and (generous) Colorado tax credits, and decided to go "whole enchilada."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
907 Posts
This is one of those "you just need to know what to ask for". When we built a new house in early 2013 (and not a high end custom home!), there are always plenty of "options" the builder will love to install (and charge for). In the end, I thought the builder wanted too much money, and had an electrician do the hookups later, but did insist on a 200A service entrance panel.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
This is one of those "you just need to know what to ask for". When we built a new house in early 2013 (and not a high end custom home!), there are always plenty of "options" the builder will love to install (and charge for). In the end, I thought the builder wanted too much money, and had an electrician do the hookups later, but did insist on a 200A service entrance panel.
We "upgraded" from two-200A panels and meters to a single 400A panel with a single net meter when the PV system was installed. IIRC, way back when, in a home we owned in Altadena, CA, we had a 60A service that had been upgraded from the original 30A a few years before we bought it. We upped the ante to 100A in about 1972, and when we moved to another Southern California home in 1975, IIRC, the building code for new construction then called for a minimum of 200A!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
240V in the garage should be standard, it would cost almost nothing over standard 20 amp 120 V, and is useful for all sorts of things like heaters, welders, and more.

Honestly, a builder should charge no more than 200 bucks for this as it is so simple to add when building, especially if they put the service panel near the garage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
240V in the garage should be standard, it would cost almost nothing over standard 20 amp 120 V, and is useful for all sorts of things like heaters, welders, and more.

Honestly, a builder should charge no more than 200 bucks for this as it is so simple to add when building, especially if they put the service panel near the garage.
We've got a beefy subpanel on the garage, and a complete 50/30A RV pedestal on a separate circuit from the mail panel as well!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
902 Posts
I am very discouraged when I do research for my intended summer vacation across the Northern Rockies and find major cities without public charging stations. I know that my fuel economy is going to take a major hit when I travel north through Wyoming, Montana, and Alberta. Forest Service Campgrounds where I sleep overnight will also not provide electrical outlets. Back in Colorado, I have read that more than half of new housing units are multi-plexes of apartments or condominiums that are not required to provide electric vehicle charging access. A diminishing segment of the population is either able or willing to purchase individual houses with grid access. The barriers against electric vehicle owners are as high as a Donald Trump wall. Thankfully, I do not own an all-electric vehicle without a range extending generator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
The province of Quebec is considering mandating that all new home construction must have a 240V hook up for electric vehicles.
That's already the case in Vancouver.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,936 Posts
... Back in Colorado, I have read that more than half of new housing units are multi-plexes of apartments or condominiums that are not required to provide electric vehicle charging access. A diminishing segment of the population is either able or willing to purchase individual houses with grid access. The barriers against electric vehicle owners are as high as a Donald Trump wall. Thankfully, I do not own an all-electric vehicle without a range extending generator.
In Minnesota no one is required to provide electric vehicle charging access.
However, companies are doing so. True, it is starting slow, but there are a score of condos and apartments that have car charging available to residents.
When I go out on home tours I ask about power to the garage and EV charging. If the builder is there, and they don't have at least the power available, I let them know I would never buy a house that didn't have it.
I'll also let them know that in my initial research for a builder, I would lean towards selecting a builder that did that in their homes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Having a 240 VAC circuit in the garage for an EVSE makes sense for everyone. Makes the home more attractive to a growing number of buyers, doesn't cost the builder a lot of money to install, and helps the collective public by helping the environment. I think it would also make sense for the building codes to mandate solar for the same reasons, at least in the regionsbof the country where there's abundunt sun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,782 Posts
I agree that having 240v in the garage is a good thing and should be a part of construction code across the country. However, mandating solar is going a little far. Incentive for solar is good enough.

Eventually, the electric companies will realize that solar is cheaper than building new power plants for peak when the most solar is available in hot States. If the grid providers go solar it'd be even more cost prohibitive to put solar on my roof.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top