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Discussion Starter #1
finally got the all clear to get the wiring run for here at the office. however the electrician is asking if the volt can handle what would be max 17amps on a 208v plug?
 

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Short Answer: Yes, the Volt can handle it.

Long answer: The EV charging station and car communicate with each other to determine the maximum safe charging level, and then the car configures it's on-board charger to only draw that much. For an electrician, the main thing is that the charging station's capabilities must be matched with the wiring and circuit breaker.

For example, if you have a 50-amp charging station and wire it up with 20-amp wiring and breaker, that won't work.

So make sure the electrician knows what the charging station capabilities are, and matches the wire and breaker to that level.
 

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For the 2017 Gen II Volt the on-board charger is rated at 3.6kw. For level II charging for the Gen II Volt you need a 208 - 230V dedicated circuit rated for at least 20 amps. 208V is for three phase power typically found in commercial applications. 230/240V is for single phase residential power applications. The Gen II Volt can and will draw up to 16 amps when using Level II charging, this requires a minimum 20 amp circuit breaker. (Note: 17 amps is neither a standard circuit breaker rating or the Volt's maximum amperage draw.) The electrical code will determine whether the circuit breaker needs to be sized for the maximum rating of the EVSE (if hard wired) or (if the EVSE is fitted with a 208/230V plug-in power cord) then the circuit breaker needs to be rated for the type of 208/230V outlet that is installed (i.e. 50 amps for a NEMA 14-50R.)

The electrician needs to see the label on the specific EVSE that will be installed. The manufacturer's label on the EVSE will specify the maximum amperage draw of the EVSE. The Volt will only be able to charge at the maximum amperage that the EVSE is capable of providing up to but not exceeding the Volt's maximum of 16 amps.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Short Answer: Yes, the Volt can handle it.

Long answer: The EV charging station and car communicate with each other to determine the maximum safe charging level, and then the car configures it's on-board charger to only draw that much. For an electrician, the main thing is that the charging station's capabilities must be matched with the wiring and circuit breaker.

For example, if you have a 50-amp charging station and wire it up with 20-amp wiring and breaker, that won't work.

So make sure the electrician knows what the charging station capabilities are, and matches the wire and breaker to that level.
its basically going to be an outside wall outlet like you'd have in your garage at home. no "station" per se. i'll just be using my stock evse that came with the car with an adapter i got from chris.
 

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its basically going to be an outside wall outlet like you'd have in your garage at home. no "station" per se. i'll just be using my stock evse that came with the car with an adapter i got from chris.
Yes. It seems your wall plug at work will be 208v at 17a. Your EVSE that came will the Volt will only draw 12a maximum but will be just fine.

Keep in mind it will charge slight slower at work than it would at home. At work it will charge at 208v x 12a = 2496 watts maximum. At home you charge at 240v x 12a = 2880 watts. Not significant but it will likely be noticable that it may take an extra 30 min for a complete charge.
 

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its basically going to be an outside wall outlet like you'd have in your garage at home. no "station" per se. i'll just be using my stock evse that came with the car with an adapter i got from chris.
The stock EVSE is rated for a maximum of 12 amps so a 208V circuit rated for 15 amps would be sufficient, 20 amps would be better for future use. Actually, if the wiring is sized correctly then a 50 amp circuit and outlet such as a NEMA 14-50R would be even better for future use. Be sure there is a hook next to the outlet so you have a way to hang/support the EVSE. You don't want the EVSE hanging from the power plug with or without Chris's adapter cable.
 

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so even though the outlet is pushing 17a, the evse and car are smart enough to limit it to 12a, correct?
The stock EVSE is rated for a maximum of 12 amps, it will never draw more than 12 amps. This maximum is communicated to the Volt's on-board charger when the EVSE charging cable is plugged into the Volt's charging port. The Volt will configure the on-board charger for 12 amp charging.

What type of plug are you having Chris assemble for the adapter cable?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The stock EVSE is rated for a maximum of 12 amps, it will never draw more than 12 amps. This maximum is communicated to the Volt's on-board charger when the EVSE charging cable is plugged into the Volt's charging port. The Volt will configure the on-board charger for 12 amp charging.

What type of plug are you having Chris assemble for the adapter cable?
same one i use for home if i can.
 

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same one i use for home if i can.
It appears to be a NEMA 14-30 plug but I am not certain. The electrician would need to install a 14-30 receptacle, the correct wire gauge and circuit breaker value for this outlet would to size the circuit for 30 amps. In the future any 208/230V equipment, such as a different higher-power EVSE, with a NEMA 14-30 plug could be plugged into the 14-30 receptacle and not overload the circuit.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
It appears to be a NEMA 14-30 plug but I am not certain. The electrician would need to install a 14-30 receptacle, the correct circuit breaker value for this outlet would be 30 amps. In the future, any 208/230 equipment with a NEMA 14-30 plug could be plugged into the 14-30 receptacle and not overload the circuit.
correct. when i had it installed at the house a 2 pole 30a breaker was used.
 

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so even though the outlet is pushing 17a, the evse and car are smart enough to limit it to 12a, correct?
That is how all appliances work. e.g. You plug your phone charger into a wall socket. The wall socket is rated at 15amps. Your phone charger is rated at 1 amp or less.

The wall socket sets the maximum, the device (in this case the EVSE) sets how much it will draw.
 

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same one i use for home if i can.
You will have to ask your electrician at work what type of receptacle they will be installing. If it is the same type as you have at home, then you are golden. If it is another type you will need to get another adapter from ChrisTX.
 

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correct. when i had it installed at the house a 2 pole 30a breaker was used.
If the electrician at your workplace is going to install a 14-30 receptacle then the wiring and circuit breaker needs to be sized for 30 amps to meet code. If the the wiring and circuit breaker installed is less, say 15 or 20 amps, and someone plugs in equipment that is designed for use on a 30 amp circuit into the 14-30 outlet that would overload the circuit and could start a fire.
 

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The Gen 2 Volt will draw a maximum of 16A from a charging station or 3.6 kW power, whichever is reached. The Volt's onboard charger will negotiate with the station as to the maximum it can draw up to 16 Amperes if the station can supply it, otherwise it will be only up to the maximum that the station can supply if it allows less than the maximum that the Volt can draw.
 

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That's irrelevant. This thread is about using a 220v charging station. The stock EVSE that comes with the Volt only works up to 120v.
Actually, the stock EVSE that is provided with the Gen II Volt has been proven to work and can be used with either 120V or 208/230V at 12 amps with an adapter cable. Not advertised but it does work. I am not an advocate for using the stock EVSE with an adapter cable for Level II charging at 208/230V but plenty of Volt owners do this every day with no issues.
 
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