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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Automaker Says Foreigners Are Lazy​

Cadillac aired its “arrogant American” ad last night during the Oscars. It is certain to alienate many people both in and outside the U.S.:


"There are plenty of things to celebrate about being American, but being possessed by a blind mania for working yourself into the ground, buying more stuff and mocking people in other countries just isn't one of them.
So we wish we could say that Cadillac's commercial for its 2014 ELR (suggested retail price: $75,000), which debuted during the Olympics, was a joke. But no, it seems to be dead serious -- a completely shameless celebration of our work-hard-buy-more culture, with a blanket dismissal of "other countries" and their laziness tossed in for good measure.
The opening shot shows a middle-aged man, played by the actor Neal McDonough, looking out over his backyard pool, asking the question: "Why do we work so hard? For this? For stuff?"
As the ad continues, it becomes clear that the answer to this rhetorical question is actually a big fat YES. And it gets worse. "Other countries, they work," he says. "They stroll home. They stop by the cafe. They take August off. Off."
Then he reveals just what it is that makes Americans better than all those lazy, espresso-sipping foreigners.
"Why aren't you like that?" he says. "Why aren't we like that? Because we're crazy, driven, hard-working believers, that's why."
By this point, the ad has already become little more than a parody of itself, but we had to ask: believers in what? The pursuit of "stuff." The other reason for America's superiority, according to Cadillac? Our unrivalled space exploration program ("We're the only ones going back up there," the ad boasts). Nevermind the fact that the U.S. government is now paying Russia $70 million a pop to shuttle NASA astronauts to the International Space Station.
Cadillacs have long been a quintessentially American symbol of wealth and status. But as this commercial proves, no amount of wealth or status is a guarantee of good taste. Now, the luxury car company is selling a vision of the American Dream at its worst: Work yourself into the ground, take as little time off as possible, and buy expensive sh*t (specifically, a 2014 Cadillac ELR).
"As for all the stuff," says the actor, revving up his shiny new car, "that's the upside of taking only two weeks off in August."
As one YouTube commenter wrote, "I'd take more vacation any day over a Cadillac." Amen to that."​

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/26/this-commercial-sums-up-e_n_4859040.html
 

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Then he shows off that he knows French with his "n'est-ce pas?".
 

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Yeah, Cadillac never said other countries were lazy. In fact, it asked why we didn't do what they do in terms of having a better work life balance. It replied saying we're crazy, hard-working, ...

It's intentionally made as a bit cocky and it does exactly what it's intended to do: Capture people's attention.

Best plug-in commercial to-date from GM, by far.
 

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I really like the ad! And I think the anti-ad brouhaha was not only expected, but desired.
The ad could only have been improved by showing him driving the car and seeing it from a few more angles. It is a beauty!
 

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It is a strange twist to have a "feel good" ad bent around so that it is a "feel superior" ad.... I'm not sure there has been a lot of research into the brand image and resulting effect of such an add. I don't want to encourage this, but in it's defense, the public has been pretty negative about "feel good" ads in general for some time now, with much of the public commentary ending up as a collective "huh?" toward the CSX or GE or Toyota brand "feel good" pieces.

This may be an attempt to break away from that, or a recognition that for many high end buyers, there is a touch of hidden narcissism in their auto buying (more often leasing) decisions. If the effect is that some (even a few) huff post regular readers (there are a lot of them, and they are pretty zealous about huff post as their source for news and opinion) end up saying publically: "that's disgusting" but then buying one anyway, then the ad worked. On top of that, there are no doubt many people who watch this ad who do feel good about it.... remember they don't need a lot of Cadillac buyers for the brand to be successful....
 

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It's probably a very good fit for the Cadillac target demographic.
 

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I have a story to tell.

My company was looking at bidders on a quarter billion dollar contract and we visited a company headquarters in Paris.

Their Vice President of Engineering came in during his Summer vacation to help in the sales presentation. The resentment of the other employees at this was palpable. I envisioned a key technical expert on holiday during a major outage.

No contract for them.
 

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That commercial makes me glad I traded my caddy in for a Volt. Agree with all the comments about ELR stunning good looks. But then the Volt looks very sharp also. After seeing the ELR at the Milwaukee auto show, I don't think I would want to swap my for door hatch for a two door sedan, especially if I had rear passengers. And after seeing the pricing, I was happier with what I paid for the Volt.
 

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I commented on another web site that people who don't like this ad don't have a sense of humor. It's ironic. It's funny. It's supposed to be funny. To me it's just a refined version of the Old Spice ads which makes the case that Cadillac is an American brand which stands for something different than the foreign luxury brands. It's maybe the only GM ad I've seen in a long time that I like.

Note that it is NOT an ELR ad. It's a brand ad. You see the car once at the end. They could swap out the ELR for the CTS or any other model in the line and it would not really change the ad. Who knows, they may have shot several versions. The thing that makes the ELR a good fit is that it looks great and it's not a four door family sedan, which plays to the "I've earned it and I'm enjoying it" message.

People who lack a sense of humor won't get the ad. Can't have everything.
 

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I commented on another web site that people who don't like this ad don't have a sense of humor. It's ironic. It's funny. It's supposed to be funny. To me it's just a refined version of the Old Spice ads which makes the case that Cadillac is an American brand which stands for something different than the foreign luxury brands. It's maybe the only GM ad I've seen in a long time that I like.

Note that it is NOT an ELR ad. It's a brand ad. You see the car once at the end. They could swap out the ELR for the CTS or any other model in the line and it would not really change the ad. Who knows, they may have shot several versions. The thing that makes the ELR a good fit is that it looks great and it's not a four door family sedan, which plays to the "I've earned it and I'm enjoying it" message.

People who lack a sense of humor won't get the ad. Can't have everything.
This ad was originally shot for another model, perhaps the CTS. At the last minute Cadillac decided to use it to introduce the ELR so the l last scene was redone.

Having worked at NATO in Brussels for many years I can say the tone of this ad really resonates with me, the level of work intensity there was much less than what I what I was used to in the US. It was sort of like being semi-retired, with incredible benefits.
 

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So not sure what exactly your intent was here. It's a dated ad by now and has been discussed ad nauseum in previous posts. So what exactly is your point? Are you saying that by virtue of this ad Ameericans are arrogant? Did you not detect a bit of tounge and cheek in this ad?
So I ask, what is your point?
 

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That commercial makes me glad I traded my caddy in for a Volt. Agree with all the comments about ELR stunning good looks. But then the Volt looks very sharp also. After seeing the ELR at the Milwaukee auto show, I don't think I would want to swap my for door hatch for a two door sedan, especially if I had rear passengers. And after seeing the pricing, I was happier with what I paid for the Volt.

I too traded in a Cadillac Deville for my 2013 Volt, but not because of this commercial. The fuel savings alone for my daily commute made this a no-brainer.
 

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I have a story to tell.

My company was looking at bidders on a quarter billion dollar contract and we visited a company headquarters in Paris.

Their Vice President of Engineering came in during his Summer vacation to help in the sales presentation. The resentment of the other employees at this was palpable. I envisioned a key technical expert on holiday during a major outage.

No contract for them.
The VP should have stayed home, and no one would have been the wiser. Shows the difficulty of competing against the larger cultural expectations.

Speaking of larger cultural expectations, Cadillac ad is a parody, SERIOUSLY? Oh, my. The audacity...


Anyhow, I liked it. Good to see an ad not so full of itself that it assumes aliens from another world would make a side trip to see the results.
 

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Funny how an American ad about others is seen as a "haha" but if another country makes the same thing about America the US Senate is ready to declare war. See just how much Americans see the humor of Top Gear directed at American cars. I don't think Top Gear will be doing anymore with Tesla for a long time.

I failed to see the humor and I have a great sense of humor. It became the Number 2 reason to keep my Volt. All communications is in the ear of the receiver. What the transmitter intended is irrelevant.
 

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Thats what you get for taking only 2 weeks off in August. N'est-ce pas
 

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See just how much Americans see the humor of Top Gear directed at American cars. I don't think Top Gear will be doing anymore with Tesla for a long time.
Top Gear faked the car having problems according to Tesla. If true, that's not tongue-in-cheek, that's plain dishonest.

In the episode, Tesla Roadsters are depicted as suffering several critical “breakdowns” during track driving. Host Jeremy Clarkson concludes the episode by saying that the Roadster doesn’t work.
Specifically, Top Gear misrepresented that:

  1. The Roadster ran out of charge and had to be pushed into the Top Gear hangar by 4 men.
  2. The Roadster’s true range is only 55 miles per charge (not 211).
  3. One Roadster’s motor overheated and was completely immobilized as a result.
  4. The other Roadster’s brakes were broken, rendering the car undriveable.
  5. That neither of the two Roadsters provided to Top Gear was available for test driving due to these problems.
The breakdowns were staged and the statements are untrue. Yet the programme’s lies are repeatedly and consistently re-broadcast to hundreds of millions of viewers worldwide on BBC television and web sites, and on other TV channels via syndication; the show is available on the internet, and is for sale on Top Gear DVD’s around the world.
Keep in mind there are two sides, Tesla's and the other guy's. And Tesla likes to live on the edge when it comes to perceived harm to it's car reputation.
 
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