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Discussion Starter #1
California residents can get a JuiceNet enabled 32 amp EVSE for $350 and charge at a cheap rate in this pilot project. Participation is limited. It closes April 30, 2017, but I was advised to get my EVSE on line and paperwork completed by April 20.

This project uses the JuiceNet EVSE to provide a virtual second electric meter so you can charge on the cheap off-peak EV electric rate, but keep your residential rate for the rest of your house. And you can view and control the wifi-connected charger from anywhere with the app.

The problem with the special EV rate is that outside the off-peak period (I'm PG&E, so weekdays it's 11 pm to 7 am; I don't know about the other CA utilities) prices are so high that it’s a bad deal unless you install a separate meter just for your EV. This is a way to avoid the installation cost and hassle.

EV rates have a much smaller off-peak period than regular residential time-of-use rates, but the off-peak price is substantially less. An additional win comes if you get into higher usage tiers. EV rates are non-tiered, and every kWh billed on the EVSE comes off the top tier of your residential bill. And for solar customers like me, taking the EV off the bill in summer might just let me get into a higher tier and get paid more for my generation.

This project is being handled through eMotorWerks. I was dealing with some time constraints and I can't say enough about how nice they have been to me. If you talk to Silvia there, tell her Walt sent you.
 

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I got a question about this so will post my initial experience, and some links, although the pilot project is closed to new applicants.

The description is on the eMotorWerks site and on the CA PUC site.

I was excited about the chance to move my Volt charging usage over to the the low EV rate while keeping my house and solar panels on the E6 rate.

I thought it was a no-brainer win, but it might not turn out that way.

Last month on my annual true-up, for the first time in many years, I had a net credit for the year with PG&E. So I wound up giving them about $80. (Despite the intent of a state law, PG&E got the PUC to write rules that let them almost never pay for excess solar generation, and if they do it's at a tiny fraction of the value.)

If this year works out the same, I will wind up paying cash for my Volt charging, albeit at the low EV-B rate, and building up an even larger credit on my home bill which PG&E will still not pay me for.

It would be worse if I weren't on Marin Clean Energy, which handles the energy cost. At least they pay me market rate for my excess generation. Otherwise I'd just be giving PG&E even more free money.
 

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Last month on my annual true-up, for the first time in many years, I had a net credit for the year with PG&E. So I wound up giving them about $80. (Despite the intent of a state law, PG&E got the PUC to write rules that let them almost never pay for excess solar generation, and if they do it's at a tiny fraction of the value.)

If this year works out the same, I will wind up paying cash for my Volt charging, albeit at the low EV-B rate, and building up an even larger credit on my home bill which PG&E will still not pay me for.

It would be worse if I weren't on Marin Clean Energy, which handles the energy cost. At least they pay me market rate for my excess generation. Otherwise I'd just be giving PG&E even more free money.
You seemed to at least have the proper info to make the right decision, and you were aware of the usual "gotcha" for solar producers. I was not so lucky and had been told by my installer that overproduction was purchased by SCE at $.16/kWh. During the year, I constantly fought with EMW to get them to correct their usage info so that I could move more billed usage to $.11 and I could then recoup at true-up for $.16. As you correctly point out, they eventually bought it for ~$.026. Thus, I paid extra fees for the priviledge of paying and extra $.084 for each kWh I used for charging.

What an overall painful experience that Phase 1 Pilot was. Hope Phase 2 is better for you.
 

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How does SCE define overproduction? Do you have to produce more kWh than you use, overall? If so, you must have a huge solar installation.
 

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I have a small installation, but an even smaller usage. I don't drive/charge much.

I believe when on a TOU plan SCE credit and charges based on the time the energy moves to or from the grid. The balance during the year shows in dollars, not kWh. So, when I saw $400 of credit, I assumed that's what I'd get. However, at true up, the convert to kWh and pay the cash settlement based on their wholesale cost for energy.
 

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My installation size is better matched to usage, so PG&E screws me with minimum charges. Last true-up in May 2017, I used about 5800 kWh for the year and produced 4900, but because of the E-6 TOU rate I still wound up ahead on generation, but a little behind on transmission.

The net PG&E charge for transmission was around $47. Minimum charges, billed monthly, were $119. So I didn't have to pay anything but lost the advantage of the $72 difference.

My Community Choice Aggregator paid me $93 cash for my generation credit. If I were 100% on PG&E, I would have lost that too.

I see there are recent moves in Orange County to look at Community Choice Aggregation. You might want to make some noise with the county supervisors.
 
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