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Discussion Starter #1
When I took my 2017 Volt in for a 35K tire rotation last Saturday I discovered that the tread was down to 4/32". Since we're just now entering the snow season in Denver I replaced them with Bridgestone Ecopia 422 Plus tires. Talk about a difference in handling - the steering with the new tires is responsive almost to sports car levels. I'm sure the cornering will improve as well, though not as much as the responsive steering but still better than the Michelins. Also, I'm not nearly as concerned with hydroplaning - spitting on the road in front of my Volt was sufficient to get the Michelins to hydroplane. I haven't tried to spin the Bridgestones yet, but it was a regular occurrence with the Michelins.

Vehicle efficiency is down, but I don't know how much of that is the cold weather since Saturday or the new tires. It's been cold enough in the mornings to almost trigger ERDTT, but not quite. I suspect it's a combination of the two, though.

35K out of a set of OEM tires - GM is back to their old tactics of forcing leased vehicles to have basically brand new tires at the end of the old standard 36 month/36K mile lease.
 

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Your experience may not be typical. In S. Cal. driving with several long trips my OE tires have 50K mi. and 1/4 tread. (well above wear bars) Handling is OK for spirited but sane driving in traffic and mountains. The tradeoff is to have highest mileage as a selling feature-- a rational decision and not, I think, a plot by the evil G.M. to screw lessors.
 

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I've been very happy with my Michelin Energy Saver A/S tires. These exact tires were OEM on my 13 Leaf and 16 Volt. Leaf still has these tires at 75000 miles, and Volt has them in good shape yet at 65000 miles. I'll buy them again, and recommend them too. I have to think there's a driver factor in their wear longevity.
 

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Michelins aren't necessarily 'crappy' - It all depends on your point of view. They're famous for their rock hard tread compounds which on a well aligned car with a 'sensible' driver will frequently last 75K or even longer - Many swear by them just for the incredible tread wear. True, you do give up a compliant ride and good handling, but for many who never ever push their vehicles to even 30% of the limit, long lasting miles is the most important thing. You either love 'em or hate 'em, but that doesn't necessarily equate to 'crappy'

Don
 

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My 2017 Volt still has the original Michelin EnergySaver A/S tires. At 17k miles I estimate the tires will last another 17k miles. In my experience the Gen 2 Volt can hydroplane in moderate to heavy rain if you drive faster than approx. 50 MPH on these tires. I would not recommend driving at 60 MPH or faster running the EnergySaver A/S tires in the rain. I have not driven my Volt in the snow, don't plan on doing so. I will leave my Volt at home, if I absolutely need to go somewhere there is always Lyft or Uber.
 

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I've had six sets of Michelins over the years - 3 OEM and 3 retail. None were worth the rubber compound they were made from. Traction has always been their weak point to the extent that simply switching to a different brand (Bridgestone, Goodyear, Pirelli) has made a huge difference in performance and traction while never impacting fuel efficiency once I get past the initial tire "break in" of wearing off any mold imperfections.

As for the 35K wear out, I suspect there was something else going on since the tires were rotated and balanced every 5K miles. Had this been April I would have run them down to 2/32" or September with an estimated 8K more on them, whichever came first, but snow and slush require 4/32" to handle the dual water meniscus that forms in the tread grooves.

As for the "crappy" comment - my Volt has hydroplaned, along with every other car I've had running Michelins, on simply sheens of water. Once the Michelins were off those cars, the hydroplaning situations ended, pure and simple. One of these cars was a Dodge Intrepid ES that handled water, slush, and snow so poorly that the old radio flyer sleds behaved better. Swapping to Bridgestones on that car made it a decent handling vehicle. When I replaced worn out Bridgestone Turanzas on a Pontiac Montana AWD with the top of the line Michelins, guess what - that Montana became a sled. My wife's current 2007 Toyota Solara SLE Convertible shipped with OEM Michelins. When those wore out I put Continental DWS tires on her car (traction being more important than tread life). The car immediately started pulling so hard I though there was a broken belt in the new tires. Turns out the Michelins had such poor traction relative to the Continentals that Toyota's final recommendation was to dump the Continentals and go back to the lower traction Michelins. Basically, the Solara's suspension is designed to pull to the right hard enough that Toyota had to go with a lower traction tire to prevent complaints about brand new cars trying to drive off the right shoulder.

Bottom line with my experience on Michelins over the past 30+ years of driving - every single one of their passenger car tires should be recalled as not safe in wet or light snow conditions. (Heavy snow is a different story altogether and requires snow tires designed for it.)
 
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I just passed 40k miles on my 2017 with the OEM tires. The wear is good with plenty of life left with the same car and tires. I live in a subtropical climate with heavy rain and haven't had an issues with hydroplaning or wet driving performance. I'm driving at 65-70 on the highway daily.

There must be other factors involved here for the OP. It may be the inflation pressure, uneven wear, or driving like on a track. The physical road condition may also be a factor.
 

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I love the Bridgestone Ecopias came stock on my 2014 Honda Insight. Good handling and good gas mileage. I replaced them for a second set after 4 years and about 55,000 (although take that with a grain of salt, since I switch to winter tires from late November to mid-April.)
 

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I think I'd scare most the forum members here half to death if they rode with me through a nice twisty road... hah

I'm at 7k mi on the OEM Michelins, and no way they're making it to 50k+. But I wouldn't have it any other way, the Volt is a great chassis, no need to be driving Miss Daisy everywhere to grind out a few more miles on some near bald tires...

The 2G Volt does need some more front negative camber - going to look into that in the spring here. Another -0.5 to -0.7 deg would be perfect, and I think even out the wear. I've run up to -4 deg front camber on a strut front suspension car that I would take to the track, and street tire wear actually isn't bad if you run zero toe up front and actually turn 'er into corners here and there.
 

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Just could be a bad batch of rubber. Having said that, I wasn't very impressed with the OEM Michelins either. I usually get excellent tire wear, but these Michelins. I only drove 26k in 3 years, rotate often, run snows in Winter, so obviously these had less than 26k, ran 40lbs, wear is even across tread, no jackrabbit starts or hard braking, but still, about 4mm left when it came time to switch to snows this year. Come Spring, I would have replaced them. IMG_0011.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So it was a little warmer this morning. I can now say the range/efficiency drop was related to the temperatures the last couple of mornings and not to the new tires.
 

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I always love hearing the blanket statements and broad generalities in forums. So much that people don't know or understand. So here is my two scents (misspelled intentionally). Manufacturers set the specifications for tires to be put on their vehicles. This is known as Tire Performance Criteria or TPC for short. It is on the sidewall. Having worked with ride and handling engineers in the past, the TPC is a compromise of R&H and MPG. There is a higher emphasis on MPG with electric vehicles that has led to lower rolling resistance to help the overall range ratings. So, to say that Michelin, Goodyear of Bridgestone is junk based on limited data sets (less than 50) is quite ignorant (in my opinion). If all tires used the same compounds but only changed tread design then you may have an argument, but that is not the case. Additionally, the factory where the rubber was made and poured makes a difference. Some tires with the same name are produced in different plants and countries. Don't even get me started on tire width and diameter...
 

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At 60,000 miles, I replaced my Michelin Energy Savers with Michelin Premier. (Still a fair amount of tread left, but one of them had a gash in the sidewall. :( ) Ride, handling and especially traction are much better with Premier. Mileage has taken a hit, though. Point is, you need to consider not just the brand, but also the model of different tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I always love hearing the blanket statements and broad generalities in forums. So much that people don't know or understand. So here is my two scents (misspelled intentionally). Manufacturers set the specifications for tires to be put on their vehicles. This is known as Tire Performance Criteria or TPC for short. It is on the sidewall. Having worked with ride and handling engineers in the past, the TPC is a compromise of R&H and MPG. There is a higher emphasis on MPG with electric vehicles that has led to lower rolling resistance to help the overall range ratings. So, to say that Michelin, Goodyear of Bridgestone is junk based on limited data sets (less than 50) is quite ignorant (in my opinion). If all tires used the same compounds but only changed tread design then you may have an argument, but that is not the case. Additionally, the factory where the rubber was made and poured makes a difference. Some tires with the same name are produced in different plants and countries. Don't even get me started on tire width and diameter...
At 60,000 miles, I replaced my Michelin Energy Savers with Michelin Premier. (Still a fair amount of tread left, but one of them had a gash in the sidewall. :( ) Ride, handling and especially traction are much better with Premier. Mileage has taken a hit, though. Point is, you need to consider not just the brand, but also the model of different tires.
I've had six different full sets of Michelins over the past three decades. Three were OEM from three different manufacturers (Dodge, Toyota, and now Chevrolet) and three were retail versions highly rated by various tire raters (CR, Tire Rack, Discount Tire, etc.) None of these six were worth the rubber compound they were made from. All were fine on dry road but as soon as the pavement got wet they were useless other than to keep the chassis from bottoming out on bumps. So yes, based on this experience, I cannot and will not recommend Michelin tires to anyone for any reason.
 

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Weird , only because ... in my opinion Michelin make some of the better motorcycle tires, and have done for decades ... however I do like both Continental and Bridgestone ...... remember though grip is by far THE most important aspect in a bike tire , economy and ride handling (usually) coming a distant second for us bikers ( wet weather grip even more important than dry)
 

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At 31kmi mine are at 3/32 in the front and 4/32 in the rear. They have been rotated, properly inflated, and I don't drive hard at all. I have to turn my lease in next month, so I guess I'm on the hook for at least two tires.
 

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My Michelins lasted around 35k miles as well. One developed a sidewall bulge. Another one developed a not-so-slow leak that admittedly could have been a nail or something. But, my mechanic (whom I trust - he's my neighbor) said the tires were almost due for replacement anyway (based on tread wear), so I just ordered new ones and had him install them.

The Continental PureContacts are pretty solid. They handle snow and rain pretty well (I think better than the Michelins when they were new). The ride does seem kind of hard now, but that could be because I'm keeping them inflated to 39 or so cold (goes up to 41-42 while driving) rather than letting them drop to 34 or so before adding air.
 

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On our 16 Vot Premier the factory michelin energy saver as tires have nearly 58,000 miles. There is still enough legal thread left to make 65,000 miles. Then I plan on going to Costco and buying another set of the identical tires and size. MPG and range is also great with these tires. Here is a fishing trip my wife and I took down the Oregon Coast via Highway 101.

20190310_202342 (2).jpg
 

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On our 16 Vot Premier the factory michelin energy saver as tires have nearly 58,000 miles. There is still enough legal thread left to make 65,000 miles. Then I plan on going to Costco and buying another set of the identical tires and size. MPG and range is also great with these tires. Here is a fishing trip my wife and I took down the Oregon Coast via Highway 101.

View attachment 157839
We have 2 16s too, with 22k miles on one and 16k on the other. I’m happy with the Michelins too so far, and if they are still available when we need to replace them, I’d be inclined to get new ones.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I'm not unhappy with the Michelins. Just finished, I hope, my first winter with the volt. I didn't think they were horrible in the snow. Not great, but not bad. And they are very round and quiet. I'll replace with same when time. If its deep snow, ie.belly rubbing deep, I'll take my 4wd truck.
 
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