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Discussion Starter #1
Sorry if this is the wrong place to post this, but the "Voltec-World-Wide" forum seems to be kind of dead.

I am currently owning a 6 year old Opel Ampera,which i bought new in 2012. It's current milage is a bit more than 50000 miles
I am very happy with the car as I am still averaging between 55 mi and 62 mi of range per charge.
Unfortunately in contrast to the car's battery,the car itself is slowly starting to show its age.

As the Voltec warranty expires in less than 2 years I have now started looking into replacements for the car.

BEVs are not an option for me as i have a long commute to work and I also take long distance trips quite frequently and the charging infrastructure is quite underdeveloped where I live.

Additionally all of the PHEVs I test drove so far (BMW i3,Hyundai Ioniq VW GTE, Kia Optima) felt like a huge step back in terms of range and build quality compared to the Ampera.


As I am not satisfied by the cars that are available in Europe I started to look into importing a new Volt instead.

However there are still some question,that I haven't been able to find answers to:

Can a Gen 2 Volt successfully charge on a 230 V outlet?

Can a dealership that is certified for working on a Gen 1 Volt also work on a Gen 2 without the car losing its Voltec warranty coverage?

Is the infotainment/ navigation system of the Volt identical with that of the Bolt? Meaning could you theoretically swap them?

Do you know about any Chevrolet dealerships in Michigan that specialize in exporting cars to Europe,or at least have done something like this before?

Sorry for my English.
Thank you for your time and for your help in advance
 

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Sorry if this is the wrong place to post this, but the "Voltec-World-Wide" forum seems to be kind of dead.

I am currently owning a 6 year old Opel Ampera,which i bought new in 2012. It's current milage is a bit more than 50000 miles
I am very happy with the car as I am still averaging between 55 mi and 62 mi of range per charge.
Unfortunately in contrast to the car's battery,the car itself is slowly starting to show its age.

As the Voltec warranty expires in less than 2 years I have now started looking into replacements for the car.

BEVs are not an option for me as i have a long commute to work and I also take long distance trips quite frequently and the charging infrastructure is quite underdeveloped where I live.

Additionally all of the PHEVs I test drove so far (BMW i3,Hyundai Ioniq VW GTE, Kia Optima) felt like a huge step back in terms of range and build quality compared to the Ampera.


As I am not satisfied by the cars that are available in Europe I started to look into importing a new Volt instead.

However there are still some question,that I haven't been able to find answers to:

Can a Gen 2 Volt successfully charge on a 230 V outlet?
Yes, you can charge it with the EVSE cable from your Ampera. Also, the Gen 2 EVSE has been tested here and works with 230VAC. You may need an adapter plug.

Can a dealership that is certified for working on a Gen 1 Volt also work on a Gen 2 without the car losing its Voltec warranty coverage?
I don't see why not, if they have Volt certified technicians.

Is the infotainment/ navigation system of the Volt identical with that of the Bolt? Meaning could you theoretically swap them?
I doubt it. The AM/FM radio in N. America uses different frequency spacings than in Europe.

Do you know about any Chevrolet dealerships in Michigan that specialize in exporting cars to Europe,or at least have done something like this before?
I'm not aware of any, but doesn't Europe require amber turn signals in the rear? I don't know if this could be retrofitted to a Volt.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
First of all thank you very much for your reply :

I don't see why not, if they have Volt certified technicians.
So you aren’t aware of any different or new tools that are needed to service the Volt Gen 2 that weren’t needed to service the Gen 1 car?


I doubt it. The AM/FM radio in N. America uses different frequency spacings than in Europe.
It seems I haven’t worded this clearly. Let me try again:

If you were to remove the infotainment system from the Volt’s dashboard, would you be able to fit the Bolt’s infotainment system into the “hole” in the dashboard ?

I am asking this as there might be an European version of the infotainment system for the Bolt.


I'm not aware of any, but doesn't Europe require amber turn signals in the rear? I don't know if this could be retrofitted to a Volt.
You are correct amber turn signals in the rear are mandatory in the EU.

However I am aware of eastern European dealerships ,that import totaled Gen 2 Volts in the US, fix them and register them.

Therefore they must have been able to adjust the lightning system of the Volt(turn signals,brake lights) according to the EU regulations and they also must have been able to obtain an emission certificate for the Volt.
 

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The Lithuanian authorities may have an interpretation of the necessary documentation that is not universally shared in other EU countries.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The Lithuanian authorities may have an interpretation of the necessary documentation that is not universally shared in other EU countries.
The cars were actually offered from sellers in Poland ;)

Once the car has the necessary documents and has successfully been registered in an European country it becomes far easier to re-import into another European country. You would probably have to pay a few hundred euros to get it reexamined by the MOT but you certainly would be able to register the car in your home country, once it has been approved by the MOT .

(This only applies to Germany and its neighboring countries,unfortunately my knowledge about the Finish legislation concerning car imports is very limited.)

In the end it doesn't matter to me though as I am not willing to shell out 40.000 € for a car that has already been involved in a severe accident and that hasn't any real warranty coverage whatsoever.


I already know a dealer that mostly sells and imports Us cars, who can get me a Volt in a heartbeat.

I just want to be certain that I can charge the Volt (with/or without am adapter) when I plug it into a socket and I want to know if I will be able to maintain the car and keep the Voltec warranty coverage if the car is serviced by one of the Chevrolet Volt certified mechanics in Europe, before I buy it.

I know that there are Volt Advisors that are active in this forum (or that used to be active at least ) and I would love to get in touch with one of them, as I think that they could help me get answers from GM.
 

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Your government website should have info on what is necessary to import a vehicle from the States. I know (in Canada the import rules are set by provinces as well as federal government) an imported Volt can be upgraded via Chev dealer software upgrades. Some of the less obvious being, two original plus third fob being present to do a recode, shorter burst (max 2 second) in Homelink garage door openers (only for Gen1), I don't know of the Gen 2's differences but you get the idea that everything isn't obvious and I don't know if your government would care (other than light bulb colours etc.). At any rate I would check your government's website first and if it's not too inconvenient talk to some one in that department before proceeding too far.
 

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5 years ago I bought a used 2013 Chevy Volt with only 1'000 miles and shipped it over to Switzerland. I'm thinking about replacing the car with a 2019 Chevy Volt by next year.
I've driven a 2017 Chevy Volt in January for some days and drove from Detroit to Chicago. I liked it very much.

The charging system is identical to the Gen1 Volt or Ampera. The car can be charged in Europe like the Ampera. Public chargers in the US are 230 Volt as well. Gen2 Volt has amber turn signals in the back. Just the front amber parking lights needs to be changed to white for Europe.

To my knowledge Chevrolet dealers in the US are not allowed to export (new) cars. That's the reason I bought a used one and I think I will do the same next year.
 

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My understanding is that there is at least one Lithuanian Gen 2 awaiting registration in Finland, and there was some uncertainty as regards CoC for emissions. Apparently the required data was not available from the Lithuanian registration papers.
 

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To my knowledge Chevrolet dealers in the US are not allowed to export (new) cars. That's the reason I bought a used one and I think I will do the same next year.
They export them to Canada all the time. The change to metric is done by dash selection. The different regulations are done by dealer (or possibly factory) software up date and different light colour regs. by light bulb changes. Chevy sells new cars to Europe all the time with what ever changes need be done. For a private person to do it, it would be incumbent on the person to see these changes are done (or have some one do them). Contact your motor vehicle department to see their regs.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
5 years ago I bought a used 2013 Chevy Volt with only 1'000 miles and shipped it over to Switzerland.
Would you mind me asking you some questions about your 2013 Volt?

Just curious what made you decide to buy a Volt in the US instead of buying one in Switzerland?
Did you import it all by yourself or did you use a dealership in Switzerland to help you with the paperwork?
Where did you go when you needed to get the car serviced? Just to a Chevrolet or Opel workshop that's certified for working on the Volt.

I'm thinking about replacing the car with a 2019 Chevy Volt by next year.
I've driven a 2017 Chevy Volt in January for some days and drove from Detroit to Chicago. I liked it very much. .
Maybe I’ll wait a few more months until I replace the Ampera with a 2018 as I think that the prices of 2018 volts will go done a bit after the 2019 Volt is released.
Unfortunately I didn’t get the opportunity to drive one yet ,but I saw a few of them on the road ,when I was visiting Traverse City last year.
I will certainly drive one when I visit my friends in Michigan again this September and I am really looking forward to it.

The charging system is identical to the Gen1 Volt or Ampera. The car can be charged in Europe like the Ampera. Public chargers in the US are 230 Volt as well. Gen2 Volt has amber turn signals in the back. Just the front amber parking lights needs to be changed to white for Europe.
That’s exactly the kind of information I was looking for. Thanks :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Where have you heard about that Lithuanian Gen 2 that's being currently registered in Finland? I'd love to read up on it.
 

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Just curious what made you decide to buy a Volt in the US instead of buying one in Switzerland?
Did you import it all by yourself or did you use a dealership in Switzerland to help you with the paperwork?
Where did you go when you needed to get the car serviced? Just to a Chevrolet or Opel workshop that's certified for working on the Volt.
I preferred the interior in beige instead of black/white. That's the only reason I bought the Volt in the US instead in Switzerland. :)
I bought it from a dealer in NY upstate, drove it to Newark where I dropped it off for shipping to Genua Italy. I picked it up there and drove it to Switzerland. So I imported it by myself, some paperwork for the homologation I've got from a spezialized company.
The car is serviced by a local Chevrolet dealership.
 

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5 years ago I bought a used 2013 Chevy Volt with only 1'000 miles and shipped it over to Switzerland. I'm thinking about replacing the car with a 2019 Chevy Volt by next year.
I've driven a 2017 Chevy Volt in January for some days and drove from Detroit to Chicago. I liked it very much.

The charging system is identical to the Gen1 Volt or Ampera. The car can be charged in Europe like the Ampera. Public chargers in the US are 230 Volt as well. Gen2 Volt has amber turn signals in the back. Just the front amber parking lights needs to be changed to white for Europe.

To my knowledge Chevrolet dealers in the US are not allowed to export (new) cars. That's the reason I bought a used one and I think I will do the same next year.
 

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I preferred the interior in beige instead of black/white. That's the only reason I bought the Volt in the US instead in Switzerland. :)
I bought it from a dealer in NY upstate, drove it to Newark where I dropped it off for shipping to Genua Italy. I picked it up there and drove it to Switzerland. So I imported it by myself, some paperwork for the homologation I've got from a spezialized company.
The car is serviced by a local Chevrolet dealership.
5 years ago I bought a used 2013 Chevy Volt with only 1'000 miles and shipped it over to Switzerland. I'm thinking about replacing the car with a 2019 Chevy Volt by next year.
I've driven a 2017 Chevy Volt in January for some days and drove from Detroit to Chicago. I liked it very much.

The charging system is identical to the Gen1 Volt or Ampera. The car can be charged in Europe like the Ampera. Public chargers in the US are 230 Volt as well. Gen2 Volt has amber turn signals in the back. Just the front amber parking lights needs to be changed to white for Europe.

To my knowledge Chevrolet dealers in the US are not allowed to export (new) cars. That's the reason I bought a used one and I think I will do the same next year.
Did you ever import a 2019 Volt from the US to Switzerland? I am thinking of importing a 2019 volt into the U.K.
 
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