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There have been a number of posts concerning EV mileage, which I have been monitoring with my own Volt the last 4 months of short & long distance driving. I got the car Jan 6th. I have noticed increases after charges that seem to be, not only positively effected by temperature, but also by speeds & distance. I was naturally concerned, when I first got the car, that I wasn't ever going to see anything on G.O.M. above 45-48, with 34k on the odometer. The G.O.M. started out at 42 after my first charge from a fully depleted battery. My weekly trips to get groceries is a 20 mile trip @ 55mph in EV mode, which only uses 1/2 the available charge. All good. Increases in EV range have been gradual, with temperatures here ranging in the mid to high 30's. Last month temps began to rise into the 40's & 50's, with the EV range making slight increases, with no change in driving habits. A recent 150 mile trip, using "Hold",
P1010412.JPG
Mountain" & regular EV didn't really make any difference. However, recent low-speed, short distance driving around the community, (yard sales), & temps into the 60's got the G.O.M. to finally reach 53. (photo attached). This was a goal I was hoping to achieve & now have even more respect for the engineering that went into the Volt. I am delighted I made the decision to get this car. The goal now is to see how high I can get the G.O.M. to go.
 

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Yes, the range estimates should start adapting to your driving habits, rather than staying with the data collected from the previous owner. Warmer weather will help, too (here in Oregon my estimated range tends to peak in the fall). By the by, it also helps if you mention your Gen 2 Volt’s model year, should a year-specific comment occur to someone who wants to respond. Couple of things to keep in mind.

My understanding is that the full charge, start of day range estimates are fuel specific. That means the ev range estimate is based on data gathered while you were driving on battery power (i.e., driving you did in Hold Mode isn’t included in the data used to estimate the ev range), and the gas range estimate is based on data gathered while you were driving while extending the range. If most of your recent 150 mile trip was accomplished while in Hold Mode or with a depleted battery, that portion of the drive would not have had a great impact on the ev range estimate.

One method of getting the GOM to go higher is by using battery power only at lower speeds... say, use Hold Mode whenever the speed reaches 40 mph or more, and switch back to Electric Mode when the speed drops below 40 mph... of course, the full charge range will then be estimating how far you car drive on battery power as long as you don’t drive over 40 mph... If you really want to know what kind of ev mileage and range you can get while driving an electric car (i.e., the BEV you buy in the future won't have a range extender), you won’t use Hold Mode, just use grid power and try to drive as efficiently as possible in all the conditions you normally encounter while driving.

On your recent trip using Mountain Mode, did you notice that when you switched to MM with more than ~2 bars of remaining power, the car remained in Electric Mode until the charge level dropped to the 2 bar point, and then switched to gas? Or perhaps you did not switch to MM until the battery was depleted, after which the system recharged the battery back up to the 2 bar level? And if you then turned the car off and back on again, that MM-recharged power was used to drive Electric Miles, but registered no kWh Used (i.e., improves the ev mileage by using battery power put there by using gas)?
 

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The GOM is just that. It can only guess based on previous driving and can not predict future conditions. For example, the GOM in our 2018 Volt is now regularly guessing 50-52 miles range with outdoor temps in the 50s. We live in an area where one has to go up and down about 600 ft frequently to negotiate the terrain. Two days ago I left the house with the GOM at 50, drove ~ 09 miles south, then drove ~12 miles north, then ~11 miles south. When I got home the GOM read 30 miles range left. Why? The 12 mile north section had a long downhilll stretch, then back up again and level for about 9 miles. The last 11 mile south stretch was by a different route that was mostly downhill. Speed on rural roads was 40-50mph. In summer, the GOM goes up to 60-62 miles traversing this same local terrain.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yes, the range estimates should start adapting to your driving habits, rather than staying with the data collected from the previous owner. Warmer weather will help, too (here in Oregon my estimated range tends to peak in the fall). By the by, it also helps if you mention your Gen 2 Volt’s model year, should a year-specific comment occur to someone who wants to respond. Couple of things to keep in mind.

My understanding is that the full charge, start of day range estimates are fuel specific. That means the ev range estimate is based on data gathered while you were driving on battery power (i.e., driving you did in Hold Mode isn’t included in the data used to estimate the ev range), and the gas range estimate is based on data gathered while you were driving while extending the range. If most of your recent 150 mile trip was accomplished while in Hold Mode or with a depleted battery, that portion of the drive would not have had a great impact on the ev range estimate.

One method of getting the GOM to go higher is by using battery power only at lower speeds... say, use Hold Mode whenever the speed reaches 40 mph or more, and switch back to Electric Mode when the speed drops below 40 mph... of course, the full charge range will then be estimating how far you car drive on battery power as long as you don’t drive over 40 mph... If you really want to know what kind of ev mileage and range you can get while driving an electric car (i.e., the BEV you buy in the future won't have a range extender), you won’t use Hold Mode, just use grid power and try to drive as efficiently as possible in all the conditions you normally encounter while driving.

On your recent trip using Mountain Mode, did you notice that when you switched to MM with more than ~2 bars of remaining power, the car remained in Electric Mode until the charge level dropped to the 2 bar point, and then switched to gas? Or perhaps you did not switch to MM until the battery was depleted, after which the system recharged the battery back up to the 2 bar level? And if you then turned the car off and back on again, that MM-recharged power was used to drive Electric Miles, but registered no kWh Used (i.e., improves the ev mileage by using battery power put there by using gas)?
Thank you for the Info & sound advice!!! My bad on not including which Gen & year my Volt is. 2017 Gen 2.
I used "Hold" mode for 35 miles before I selected MM & had 2 bars, which stayed with me until I got home. I am avoiding letting the batt deplete, realizing it can mess with my attempts to "Hypermile".
 

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You'll definitely see a jump with warmer weather. The heater kills range, as it's using ~7kw peak to heat the coolant. The a/c uses virtually nothing by comparison. Maybe 1-2kw on initial cooldown, then you don't even notice the load on the power gauge.

Also higher speeds use more power, so as mentioned if you want the max range driving at slower speeds is the way to go.
 

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Thank you for the Info & sound advice!!! My bad on not including which Gen & year my Volt is. 2017 Gen 2.
I used "Hold" mode for 35 miles before I selected MM & had 2 bars, which stayed with me until I got home. I am avoiding letting the batt deplete, realizing it can mess with my attempts to "Hypermile".
If you're trying to maximize your energy efficiency, use your battery. Using Hold or Mountain Mode to preserve two bars of battery isn't somehow helping your car's efficiency. And even if there are scenarios where you can trick the GOM, that doesn't yield any actual benefits, e.g. extended range, you're just tricking a software algorithm.
 

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If you're trying to maximize your energy efficiency, use your battery. Using Hold or Mountain Mode to preserve two bars of battery isn't somehow helping your car's efficiency. And even if there are scenarios where you can trick the GOM, that doesn't yield any actual benefits, e.g. extended range, you're just tricking a software algorithm.
Range masturbation. :ROFLMAO:
 

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There have been a number of posts concerning EV mileage, which I have been monitoring with my own Volt the last 4 months of short & long distance driving. I got the car Jan 6th. I have noticed increases after charges that seem to be, not only positively effected by temperature, but also by speeds & distance. I was naturally concerned, when I first got the car, that I wasn't ever going to see anything on G.O.M. above 45-48, with 34k on the odometer. The G.O.M. started out at 42 after my first charge from a fully depleted battery. My weekly trips to get groceries is a 20 mile trip @ 55mph in EV mode, which only uses 1/2 the available charge. All good. Increases in EV range have been gradual, with temperatures here ranging in the mid to high 30's. Last month temps began to rise into the 40's & 50's, with the EV range making slight increases, with no change in driving habits. A recent 150 mile trip, using "Hold", View attachment 172298 Mountain" & regular EV didn't really make any difference. However, recent low-speed, short distance driving around the community, (yard sales), & temps into the 60's got the G.O.M. to finally reach 53. (photo attached). This was a goal I was hoping to achieve & now have even more respect for the engineering that went into the Volt. I am delighted I made the decision to get this car. The goal now is to see how high I can get the G.O.M. to go.
Temps from 75 to 85, no hills, no wind, all roads <40 mph.
172315
 

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Those vehicle status numbers of:
Efficiency 176.4 MPG
Electric 23,767 miles
Total 30,201 miles
(Gas 6,434 miles)

enable you to know
lifetime Gas Used = odo/lifetime MPG = 30,201/176.4 = 171.2 Gals
and, 171.2 = number of ev miles to drive without using gas to increase the MPG by 1.0000,
i.e., if you drive using battery power only, no gas, until the odometer reads 30,372.2 total miles, that ups the efficiency number to 177.4 MPG

and this vehicle status screen indicates your current lifetime gas mileage when using gas = 37.5 MPGcs
 
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