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Have you replaced your Volt's brake pads due to wear?

  • I have never replaced my Volt's brake pads due to wear.

    Votes: 94 96.9%
  • I have had to replace my Volt's brake pads due to wear.

    Votes: 3 3.1%

  • Total voters
    97
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Discussion Starter #1
I was speaking with a friend the other day about brake wear in EVs. This was prompted by his reading an article that stated that brake dust is the primary harmful pollutant that cars put out. The article then went on to claim that EVs actually produce more brake dust than their ICEV counterparts.

We all know this is erroneous because EVs use their brakes far less frequently and intensely than ICEVs. But when I offered up as an example that I had never heard of a single Volt owner who has replaced brake pads due to wear, it got me thinking, how many of us actually have? I'm not going to include this in the poll, but feel free to comment on your total mileage and your mileage when you replaced your pads (if ever).
 

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Discussion Starter #2
For me, I have logged over 110,000 between two Volts, and I have never had to replace my brake pads.
 

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What's a brake pad? ;) The great thing about regen is that it works best at higher speeds, which is where your brakes would be put under the greatest stress.
 

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I've never had to. A co worker, however, did have to have his rotors replaced. It seems they eventually start rusting unevenly from lack of use. At least his did, anyway. It was like some parts of the rotor were rusting and others were not.
 

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I've never had to replace brake pads on any of my ICE vehicles either. I have put 140,000-175,000 miles on several without ever needing new pads. Maybe it's just the way I drive, but I highly doubt my Volt will ever need any either, as the brakes are used even less.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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We know EVs and hybrid have less brake wear, but I analyzed how people drive with ICEVs, and I discovered why some drivers had more than one pad change per year. The main problems are with the automatic transmissions and engine creep in ICEVs. Most drivers with manual transmissions learn how to use the hand brake when stopped so they can rest both feet (clutch and accelerator). Automatic vehicle drivers don't do that, so they tend keep the transmission in "D" (drive) and ride their brakes with the right foot because of the engine creep. In my GM vehicles, I learned to drive like it was a manual by shifting to "N" (neutral) to release the engine (and prevent creep), and use the hand brake to keep it still when stopped.

So for my past 1995 Buick Regal, in 21 years of ownership, the brake pads were replaced three times (i did the last two in my carport). My present 2009 Chevy Equinox still has the factory pads after seven years. My method works!
 

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Pads and rotors front & rear still had plenty of thickness on my Volt back at 50,000 miles when I last checked but what was really bugging me was the intermittent brake squeak being caused by rusty/worn brake hardware that I pulled off pictured above.






Spent a whopping @$20 total from O'Reilly to replace the worn brake hardware on my Gen1 with the Carlson QuietGlide Disc Brake Hardware Kit which has eliminated any further squeaking. Part#s for this replacement hardware on the Volt was H5851Q for both front brakes and H5852Q for both sets of rear brakes.
 

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Over 75k miles on my brakes so far...
 

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Most of my driving is local and in stop and go traffic so I am normally in low gear, requiring very little use of the brakes.
 

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Never cleaning brake dust off the wheels like an ICE car. Brake dust is brake pads wearing. No wear, no dust.
 

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SSonentag we find that hard to believe. Every conventional ICE vehicle needs at least pads by 100,000 most need front pads at 50,000. Unless your a little old lady who never drives over 25 to church and home.
 

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SSonentag we find that hard to believe. Every conventional ICE vehicle needs at least pads by 100,000 most need front pads at 50,000. Unless your a little old lady who never drives over 25 to church and home.
I have a 2002 Chevy Avalanche with 130,000 miles. My rear pads needed to be replace at 70,000, but my front are still original. They were checked last week when I had new tires installed, and they are still have 50% pad left.
 

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We know EVs and hybrid have less brake wear, but I analyzed how people drive with ICEVs, and I discovered why some drivers had more than one pad change per year. The main problems are with the automatic transmissions and engine creep in ICEVs. Most drivers with manual transmissions learn how to use the hand brake when stopped so they can rest both feet (clutch and accelerator). Automatic vehicle drivers don't do that, so they tend keep the transmission in "D" (drive) and ride their brakes with the right foot because of the engine creep. In my GM vehicles, I learned to drive like it was a manual by shifting to "N" (neutral) to release the engine (and prevent creep), and use the hand brake to keep it still when stopped.

So for my past 1995 Buick Regal, in 21 years of ownership, the brake pads were replaced three times (i did the last two in my carport). My present 2009 Chevy Equinox still has the factory pads after seven years. My method works!
This doesn't make sense. When completely stopped at a red light with the transmission in D, with brake pedal applied - that does not cause wear on the pad.

Theoretically you could stay in that position for 100 years and your pad would not be worse for wear
 

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The brake dust is so light, it may just be road dirt on the wheels. I do put the car in neutral, once in a while, coming down the hill to keep the rotors clean.
 

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I have a 2002 Chevy Avalanche with 130,000 miles. My rear pads needed to be replace at 70,000, but my front are still original. They were checked last week when I had new tires installed, and they are still have 50% pad left.
And this doesn't make sense either. Usually the front pads go first as they are the major stopping force of a vehicle.
 

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I have not had to replace the pads. I have, however needed to replaced the left rear rotor and caliper on my 2011 Volt, which were completely corroded and frozen up. I live near the ocean, and the car is parked outdoors, hence the corrision. But it also illustrates how little the rear brakes get used.
 

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I have never had my brakes replaced and at my last service (70K miles), the service tech said that the brakes looked new.

Like others, I do get the squeak due to rust. Putting the Volt in neutral on a highway off ramp (to force use of friction brakes) cleans off the rust and no more squeak.
 
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