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Any L only drivers with over 30,000 miles get their brake pad wear level checked? I've crossed the 2 year mark with similar mileage but wasn't planning on getting the pads checked for a few more years.

Thanks,
MrEnergyCzar
 

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I. had a Saturn Vue greenline. hybrid. I put 90k+ on it never touched the bra'kes. I don't think I will ever have to changes these brake pads do to regen. The Saturn would regen but the Vue does is much better.
 

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I'll be getting my tires rotated sometime next week for 37,500 miles. I'll have them check and will post what the status of my break pads are.
 

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I only feel my brakes get used under 5mph and also during only two hard braking events I've done where they had to come on beyond the regen. I suspect my 2011 has pretty newish brake pads and clean rotors - at 26K miles now. I have done a good amount of highway driving, however.
 

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Until recently when I went to a new job site that I needed to do a lot of stop and go driving and heavy breaking on the highway, my brakes would squeal from the rust when backing out of the garage and now I hear nothing after actually using the brakes and cleaning the rotors. I love L driving.
 

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image.jpg You spelled it wrong, didn't you mean "brake where"? ;)

But seriously, i have 31,000 miles, always drive in L but know next to nothing about brakes.

So I've attached a close up photo of my front left brake; maybe someone can tell something from that??
 

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My gut feeling is the brake pads and disks will outlast the car. I have 45,000 miles on my 2011 Volt with no noticeable brake wear. I always use L for stop and go city driving and use D for highway on cruise control.
 

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This is another reason car makers are worried about electrics. The maintanance costs are so much less, and dealerships will have to change their profit models since the cars won't be back as often for rutine service.
 

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I also own a Prius. Most Prius cars seem to go well over 100k miles on a set of pads with no problem.
The Volt's more powerful regen capabilities along with much larger brakes leave me with no doubt that I'll end up replacing for rust rather than for pad wear.
At 3500 miles my rotors are just starting to look shiny and I don't use L at all.
 

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At nearly 15K miles my brake rotors don't look like they are seated in. You still can see what looks like the original machining marks, IE the rotor does not have a smooth appearance like other rotors.

I challenge guys at work after we've driven the Volt to lunch to reach in and touch the rotor when we get back to the office... You won't want to do this with a normal ICE car.

I agree, don't think there is a need to change the pads for many many miles..
 

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I also own a Prius. Most Prius cars seem to go well over 100k miles on a set of pads with no problem.
The Volt's more powerful regen capabilities along with much larger brakes leave me with no doubt that I'll end up replacing for rust rather than for pad wear.
At 3500 miles my rotors are just starting to look shiny and I don't use L at all.
Due to the treatment of the rotors, you should not need to worry about replacing the rotors for a very long time (Ferritic Nitro-Carburizing). Haven't you wondered why you haven't seen any rust on the rotors?
 

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Don't think it matters if you drive in L or D because of the design of the brake system,
When driven normally even in D you are braking electrically till the last moment... anyway.

Lucky GM actually made the discs of material that rusts a lot less than conventional discs - as otherwise at the rate
I'm going they would have rusted solid on a normal car LOL!
 

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Due to the treatment of the rotors, you should not need to worry about replacing the rotors for a very long time (Ferritic Nitro-Carburizing). Haven't you wondered why you haven't seen any rust on the rotors?
This is the first I've heard of it! I call that good news indeed.
 

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Don't think it matters if you drive in L or D because of the design of the brake system,
When driven normally even in D you are braking electrically till the last moment... anyway.
The reason it might matter is that the Volt starts to decelerate at a faster rate the moment you let off of the accelerator pedal. So, for the entire time between letting off of the accelerator pedal and applying the brake pedal to the point that the friction brakes engage, you are decelerating at a faster rate. And that leaves far less energy for the Volt's brake pads to absorb. I'm not saying that it is of huge significance, but over time (say, 30,000 miles) it could add up.

If I had to assess my current friction brake usage, I'd say that it is sporadic at best. On good days, my friction brakes don't engage at any speed over about 3-4 MPH. On bad days, I might feel them grab two to three times at speeds greater than 4 MPH.
 

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Due to the treatment of the rotors, you should not need to worry about replacing the rotors for a very long time (Ferritic Nitro-Carburizing). Haven't you wondered why you haven't seen any rust on the rotors?
One of our members had a faulty, sticking brake that burned up a pad and caused some rotor damage. The dealer repaired it all under warranty, however, instead of replacing the rotor, they resurfaced it, removing the treatment. The rotor rusted immediately. So the driver now has three shiny metal rotors and one orange one. :(
 

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The reason it might matter is that the Volt starts to decelerate at a faster rate the moment you let off of the accelerator pedal. So, for the entire time between letting off of the accelerator pedal and applying the brake pedal to the point that the friction brakes engage, you are decelerating at a faster rate. And that leaves far less energy for the Volt's brake pads to absorb. I'm not saying that it is of huge significance, but over time (say, 30,000 miles) it could add up.
I find this somewhat comforting actually, and it may contribute to collision avoidance, since the stronger regen in L acts as a 'prebrake' when you take your foot off the accelerator when not in cruise control. What you get in front-end collision avoidance you may give back in rear-end collision risk, but I still much prefer driving in L at all times (including when in CC).
 

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but wasn't planning on getting the pads checked for a few more years.
Why ?
Checking the brake pads (looking at them for abnormal wear) should cost you little to
nothing if done during a tire rotation.
Use is not the only thing that can wear the pads; so can a sticking caliper from reasons unknown.
 

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The reason it might matter is that the Volt starts to decelerate at a faster rate the moment you let off of the accelerator pedal. So, for the entire time between letting off of the accelerator pedal and applying the brake pedal to the point that the friction brakes engage, you are decelerating at a faster rate. And that leaves far less energy for the Volt's brake pads to absorb. I'm not saying that it is of huge significance, but over time (say, 30,000 miles) it could add up.

If I had to assess my current friction brake usage, I'd say that it is sporadic at best. On good days, my friction brakes don't engage at any speed over about 3-4 MPH. On bad days, I might feel them grab two to three times at speeds greater than 4 MPH.
I believe there is a flaw in your thinking. Yes, in L deceleration is greater and more electricity is being put back into the battery in a given period of time. But, when you have reached 3 - 4 mph, whereever the regeneration is turn off and the mechanical brakes are applied... you have reached 3 - 4 mph. In other words, you aren't going any faster or slower at that point. What the car was experiencing before that point is irrelevent from the mechanical brakes point of view. The mechanical brakes will be counter-acting the same inertia.

I find it hard to know if/when the mechanical brakes are engaging under any other scenerio other than when reaching 3 - 4 mph. What should I look for or sense? thanks.
 
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