GM Volt Forum banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So… I awoke to see the 21&22 Bolts now are also being recalled.
This is my first time ever bringing a vehicle for a “major” recall and I am somewhat uncomfortable because it’s a ~3month old car.
So… does anyone know what I should ask for? Is there anything the dealer (thru GM) should do above and beyond for me here? Considering the circumstances and supply chain issues, will they be able to fix the issues in a relative short period of time?

thank you for your knowledge!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
I really don't think it will be fixed in a short period of time. They announced the recall, but from what I've read they aren't producing "fixed" battery packs yet. Combined with a microchip shortage and things will take a while.

How much do you like the car? If you like it and can charge safely outside and within the recommended range, you could keep it. If I were you, I'd request a buyback. A car is too much of a purchase for me to wait months or potentially a year to be able to use to its advertised capacity.

At the very least, if you aren't personally comfortable driving the car, I would expect a competent dealership to give you a loaner vehicle until the recall can be repaired.

Just my two cents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,951 Posts
I really don't think it will be fixed in a short period of time. They announced the recall, but from what I've read they aren't producing "fixed" battery packs yet. Combined with a microchip shortage and things will take a while.

How much do you like the car? If you like it and can charge safely outside and within the recommended range, you could keep it. If I were you, I'd request a buyback. A car is too much of a purchase for me to wait months or potentially a year to be able to use to its advertised capacity.

At the very least, if you aren't personally comfortable driving the car, I would expect a competent dealership to give you a loaner vehicle until the recall can be repaired.

Just my two cents.
I just bought my Bolt about 30 days ago. When buying I saw only a few used cars on the lot and absolutely no new cars and the rental companies are always out of cars, I doubt that the dealers can provide adequate loaner to anyone.
 
  • Like
Reactions: wannabe

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I really don't think it will be fixed in a short period of time. They announced the recall, but from what I've read they aren't producing "fixed" battery packs yet. Combined with a microchip shortage and things will take a while.

How much do you like the car? If you like it and can charge safely outside and within the recommended range, you could keep it. If I were you, I'd request a buyback. A car is too much of a purchase for me to wait months or potentially a year to be able to use to its advertised capacity.

At the very least, if you aren't personally comfortable driving the car, I would expect a competent dealership to give you a loaner vehicle until the recall can be repaired.

Just my two cents.
Is a Buyback realistic? My state has a very good lemon law but I don’t want to take a bath here… I like the car, but I don’t fall in love with cars so if I was offered something reasonable I would take it and go get myself a different EV.
But I 100% agree that the loaner is a bare minimum for me. My family has been going to this dealership for decades and between my wife and I we are on our 7th car from them, so I doubt they want to shun us over a loaner…
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
42 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I just bought my Bolt about 30 days ago. When buying I saw only a few used cars on the lot and absolutely no new cars and the rental companies are always out of cars, I doubt that the dealers can provide adequate loaner to anyone.
I can see that dealerships wouldn’t have as many as before (I think the dealership I deal with has 2), that said, I am hopeful they will not exacerbate the problem by having cars in their shops for weeks at a time without offering customers (of brand new cars) a loaner…
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,218 Posts
So… I awoke to see the 21&22 Bolts now are also being recalled.
This is my first time ever bringing a vehicle for a “major” recall and I am somewhat uncomfortable because it’s a ~3month old car.
So… does anyone know what I should ask for? Is there anything the dealer (thru GM) should do above and beyond for me here? Considering the circumstances and supply chain issues, will they be able to fix the issues in a relative short period of time?

thank you for your knowledge!
Nothing to ask for, they will simply repair/replace the battery or specific cells as needed. Your new Bolt is under warranty for that anyway. For you, it's like any other recall under the 36 month bumper to bumper or the 8 year battery warranties. For my 4 year old Bolt it's a bigger deal.

GM also had a battery safety recall in the early days of my 2011 Volt. It was handled very well. Been driving the car ever since without issue. In fact, my 2011 is the best car I have owned regarding lack of issues. It's rarely been in the Chevy service area, all for minor stuff. My 2017 Bolt, same thing.

For me, the recall is a bigger deal than for you. I get a brand new battery in my 4 year old car, I get 8% more driving range and I get a new 8 year/100k mile warranty. You have all those already with your brand new Bolt, but you do get a battery upgrade and of course a potential problem fixed.

But do follow the safety procedures while waiting for the car to be called in. Park it outside, don;t charge past 90%, don't drain it past 70 miles, and use small top-off instead of big recharges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I'm glad to wait a reasonable amount of time, driving my now diminished-range LEASED 2020 Bolt EV. But who knows how many months it will take for GM to be ready to fix the car? About four months from now I'm going to see if I can cancel my lease, due to the diminished functionality of the vehicle. I guess I need to read my lease agreement pretty carefully. I live in Maryland.

As a leaser, I receive little added value from the new batteries and none from the extended battery warranty.

Does anyone have any experience with canceling a lease due to circumstances similar to this?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Nothing to ask for, they will simply repair/replace the battery or specific cells as needed. Your new Bolt is under warranty for that anyway. For you, it's like any other recall under the 36 month bumper to bumper or the 8 year battery warranties. For my 4 year old Bolt it's a bigger deal.

GM also had a battery safety recall in the early days of my 2011 Volt. It was handled very well. Been driving the car ever since without issue. In fact, my 2011 is the best car I have owned regarding lack of issues. It's rarely been in the Chevy service area, all for minor stuff. My 2017 Bolt, same thing.

For me, the recall is a bigger deal than for you. I get a brand new battery in my 4 year old car, I get 8% more driving range and I get a new 8 year/100k mile warranty. You have all those already with your brand new Bolt, but you do get a battery upgrade and of course a potential problem fixed.

But do follow the safety procedures while waiting for the car to be called in. Park it outside, don;t charge past 90%, don't drain it past 70 miles, and use small top-off instead of big recharges.
You won't necessarily get a new battery. They are going to use a new software sniffer again to try and reduce module replacement. Just how this is applied I don't know. If they replace one module and it's the higher output cell, do they have to replace ALL modules? Or, if they don't sniff a bad module then you're sent on your way, and I doubt with a new warrantee. The new software still isn't ready from what I read.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
......... About four months from now I'm going to see if I can cancel my lease, due to the diminished functionality of the vehicle. .......
Functionality for my 2017 Bolt is a BIG issue now that winter is coming. I don't have the luxury of living in SoCal for the winter. Already my battery is suffering due to cold conditions when it wouldn't be a big deal normally.. Snow tires are now on. And I see the battery having to be conditioned on start up. That wouldn't be a big deal in my tempered garage under the house. And plugged in. I can't charge it overnight for safety reasons and that's a BIG deal for an EV owner in a rural area.

So now, I have to go out in the morning and get the snow and ice off. Preconditioning becomes an issue. Move the car in the garage and plug in and eat breakfast and then go back out. Even with preconditioning the battery isn't in top form. If I don't have time I'll just wing it. The range is already hitting 3m/kwh and it isn't even bad yet. I was 3.9 to 4m/kwh. More in the summer. I'll have to charge when I can during the day or evening. I'll be lucky to get 2.5m/kwh when it gets colder. And ice and snow is going to be a b####. Now when I go to the big burg I'll have to get a DCFC to make it back home when before it wasn't an issue. But the 90% charge limit and having to charge anytime it gets below 70 miles of range loses me almost 50 miles in range - and that's in good weather. The cold will take a much bigger % of the range I have left. I'll lose MORE than 1/3 range I'll actually have. I'm guessing I will not hit 150 miles of range.

Note, normally I don't usually charge fully unless it results in making a round trip with some cushion and avoiding a DCFC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
You won't necessarily get a new battery. They are going to use a new software sniffer again to try and reduce module replacement. Just how this is applied I don't know. If they replace one module and it's the higher output cell, do they have to replace ALL modules? Or, if they don't sniff a bad module then you're sent on your way, and I doubt with a new warrantee. The new software still isn't ready from what I read.
What made you think I had a new Bolt?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
Nothing to ask for, they will simply repair/replace the battery or specific cells as needed. Your new Bolt is under warranty for that anyway. For you, it's like any other recall under the 36 month bumper to bumper or the 8 year battery warranties. For my 4 year old Bolt it's a bigger deal.

GM also had a battery safety recall in the early days of my 2011 Volt. It was handled very well. Been driving the car ever since without issue. In fact, my 2011 is the best car I have owned regarding lack of issues. It's rarely been in the Chevy service area, all for minor stuff. My 2017 Bolt, same thing.

For me, the recall is a bigger deal than for you. I get a brand new battery in my 4 year old car, I get 8% more driving range and I get a new 8 year/100k mile warranty. You have all those already with your brand new Bolt, but you do get a battery upgrade and of course a potential problem fixed.

But do follow the safety procedures while waiting for the car to be called in. Park it outside, don;t charge past 90%, don't drain it past 70 miles, and use small top-off instead of big recharges.
What made you think I had a new Bolt?

As for the advice of "Just do this until ......." you can read why 'Just do this' is a big issue in the winter here. It goes from just wait and don't burn your house down to a miserable experience and a car that isn't fully operable at any level anymore.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,218 Posts
What made you think I had a new Bolt?

As for the advice of "Just do this until ......." you can read why 'Just do this' is a big issue in the winter here. It goes from just wait and don't burn your house down to a miserable experience and a car that isn't fully operable at any level anymore.
I understand you are taking a lawyerly position with "isn't fully operable at any level anymore", but we use our Bolt almost exclusively. The Volt basically sits. We drive the Bolt all over the Chicago metro area, so no range issue. I had been using Hilltop Reserve to limit charging to 90% all along, so that "mandate" from GM hasn't affected me. Parking outside is an inconvenience for us, but this too shall pass. If it wasn't for parking outside, I would not know there was an issue. For us, fully operable as before except the park outside after charging bit. Again, not ideal but far from the sky is falling. YMMV
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
For us, fully operable as before except the park outside after charging bit. Again, not ideal but far from the sky is falling. YMMV
Are you telling me that there isn't a range reduction or that my range figures don't reflect the real situation? If so, please elaborate. I have to run snows and we don't live on a table top like Chicago running arterials. I understand the Bolt, as is, serves your needs. It doesn't serve mine anymore.

Today my wife had to go to the city for an appointment and we needed to review the trip before hand. Snow is coming later today than forecast. Luckily it was warmer than I expected but still in the 30s*. I finally decided to lift the 90% charge limit which gave her at least 25 additional miles at 200 expected range. She didn't use heat until she knew she had the range to have a good margin on the return trip. I don't know what speed she maintained but I imagine it was conservative. She arrived home with 50 miles left but had she heated it would have been less (probably down to 30), really stretching the limit on discharge that GM wants. I stretched the GM limitations on both ends. If the damn thing burns when I recharge GM can say it's my fault. Strictly defined, GM sold a defective product, obviously unknowingly, resulting in the limitations prescribed. And it needs a lot of time to inspect and repair the product.

I've driven every kind of rig and machine so I'm confident in my analysis. Maybe it wouldn't be a big deal in Chicago but I thankfully don't live there. In top form the Bolt is good. Not in top form, as it is now, in winter, here, it's a pain. Nobody wanted this situation, especially GM, but I'm ready to move on. I've been an enthusiastic supporter of the Bolt until it really crimps our quality of life. If I though GM could replace the battery quickly I'd be more patient but that isn't going to happen. The Spark EV can stay as it has a specific usefullness.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,218 Posts
Are you telling me that there isn't a range reduction or that my range figures don't reflect the real situation?
I said, "YMMV"

Just got an email:

We are pleased to inform you that we have developed an advanced diagnostic software package that will remove parking and charging limitations on your vehicle while we work on building replacement battery modules. We will begin rolling out the software in 2019 model year vehicles, which remain our highest priority. In approximately 30 days we will expand the software to all remaining vehicles.
This software will automatically limit your vehicle’s maximum state of charge to 80%, which will allow you to safely resume:
• Charging indoors overnight
• Depleting your vehicle’s battery below 70 miles (113 km) of range, resulting in greater overall vehicle range compared to GM’s prior interim charging guidance
• Parking indoors after charging
This software also contains new diagnostics designed to detect specific abnormalities that might indicate a rare battery issue in your vehicle.

They say this is not the battery replacement. That's still to come. But it addresses the inconvenience of the current charging and parking issues. I'll probably have it done when they call me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
144 Posts
I said, "YMMV"

This software also contains new diagnostics designed to detect specific abnormalities that might indicate a rare battery issue in your vehicle.

They say this is not the battery replacement. That's still to come. But it addresses the inconvenience of the current charging and parking issues. I'll probably have it done when they call me.
Are you counting on a battery replacement? As I understand it the remedy will be repair OR replace. The language varies. I haven't seen rock solid language that every 2017-9 will have replacement as THE solution. If you have, or anyone else has, I'd like to see the wording.

I'm guessing that this latest software, if it works, will indicate the final solution on each individual car. I will be delighted if they fully replace on my 2017. But I hope to be rid of it by then.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
21,218 Posts
Are you counting on a battery replacement?
Given my Bolt is a 2017, and I have in the past done all the things we are not supposed to do now, I suspect my battery pack doesn't have the defects that would require battery replacement. I think GM suspects the same and that's why it's focused on the newer Bolts first. Time will tell.

Other's have found this or that issue with their Volt and sold them, bashing GM and the Volt on their way out the door. I get it, heck, I have a brother who will never, ever buy a GM because when he was a kid our parents GM car had it's paint peel and the dealer did nothing. I have the same attitude toward AmEx. I'll never, ever get that card because they screwed me out of air miles decades ago. People can hold grudges against a brand, lol.

But my Volt experience has been very good and my Volt is now 10 years old. My Bolt experience has likewise been good. The Bolt's battery issue is being addressed— though not as quickly as we all would like. At a minimum, supply chain issues are certainly playing a role as it is in almost every industry today. My local HD has no metal primer spray paint for example. Shelf bare for weeks.

But I have no doubt the Bolt battery issue will be fixed with a software and possible battery upgrade depending on the car. Like the Volt, I plan to keep the Bolt for a long, long time.

Again your mileage may vary...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,029 Posts
Remember only 13 Bolts have caught fire out of 140,000 being driven and charged to all sorts of conditions so the chances of your Bolt having the problem is very small. They initially reduced charging levels to take that down even further. Now they have more sophisticated software so you can safely park then in your garage until battery is replaced (although battery is still up in the air somewhat it seems). Very small chance anything will happen. Hyundai's ICE where bursting into flames with millions being recalled and it hardly made the news (although there was security footage on one bursting into flames unattended in an underground parking lot. If you need the full range, use it. There's a greater chance it's going to get totaled in a traffic accident than there is it is going to burst into flames. The problem wasn't one but two faults being present to possibly cause a problem and it wasn't a design fault, it was a manufacturing fault.

If you are teetering on range limits in cold weather, then it's not the right car for you, you may need a 300+ range EV, not a 250 mile range EV.

The average a car is driven per day is 33 miles. The Bolt exceeds that by over 7 times. It's not a long distance, interstate cruiser (it only uses a 50Kwh charger, higher is a waste of technology). Porsche has determined a optimal range is 300 to 350 mile range car as most of the time you are dragging around and paying for) a battery you seldom use. For those that do need the range, travelling sales people (do they still have those) the Chinese have a 600+ mile car out. Till then we have the new driving paradigm of knowing (or being able to find out) where the chargers are.

In short, I would charge the car to full when you need it and not worry about it. Houses burn down or explode all the time but we still live in them.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
Top