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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
As per the Bolt Owners Manual
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Bolt Owners Manual said:
2017 Chevrolet Bolt Maintenance Schedule
Owner Checks and Services

Once a Month
• Check the tire inflation pressures. See Tire Pressure.
• Inspect the tires for wear. See Tire Inspection.
• Check the windshield washer fluid level. See Washer Fluid.

Required Services Every 12 000 km/7,500 mi
• Rotate the tires, if recommended for the vehicle, and perform the following services. See Tire Rotation.
• Check vehicle coolant level.
• Check windshield washer fluid level. See Washer Fluid.
• Visually inspect windshield wiper blades for wear, cracking, or contamination. See Exterior Care. Replace worn or damaged wiper blades. See Wiper Blade Replacement.
• Check tire inflation pressures. See Tire Pressure.
• Inspect tire wear. See Tire Inspection.
• Visually check for fluid leaks.
• Inspect brake system. See Exterior Care.
• Visually inspect steering, suspension, and chassis components for damaged, loose, or missing parts or signs of wear. See Exterior Care.
• Check restraint system components. See Safety System Check.
• Lubricate body components. See Exterior Care.
• Check accelerator pedal for damage, high effort, or binding. Replace if needed.
• Visually inspect gas strut for signs of wear, cracks, or other damage. Check the hold open ability of the strut. See your dealer if service is required.
• Check tire sealant expiration date, if equipped. See Tire Sealant and Compressor Kit.

               
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
What about the lube in the transaxle ?
I believe it's 97.5k miles on Chevy's other two EV's.
The 1ET25 drive unit holds approx. 2.9 qts of ATF and is currently considered a "fill for life" assembly -barring any leaks or other service. (as is the case with numerous other GM transaxles actually)

The drive unit is cooled by circulated cooling loops using both ATF (primary lubrication) and Dexcool (stator cooler) as the thermal medium
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
What is the source of this? What/who is "Bolt Owners Manual"? Another account on this forum?
official root source is the GM Service information system I posted above
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What is the source of this? What/who is "Bolt Owners Manual"? Another account on this forum?
Who or what is the Bolt EV owner's manual? lol, really?
 

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It's an honest question. See the first post. "Originally Posted by Bolt Owners Manual"

"lol, really?" ...from a moderator

"What's an owner's manual?" Yes, hang around here a while and you'll find that's both funny and sad at the same time.
 

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The 1ET25 drive unit holds approx. 2.9 qts of ATF and is currently considered a "fill for life" assembly -barring any leaks or other service. (as is the case with numerous other GM transaxles actually)...
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Oh goodlord, not another 'lifetime lube'....
Same as the Prius.
There is no such thing, unless you are talking about the lifetime of ownership that always ends when the warranty runs out.

I started what turned out to be a huge thread after posting my oil analysis results from doing a transaxle oil change at 114k miles on my '10 Prius IV w/solar sunroof.
You wouldn't believe the dark pearlescent crud I drained out, (and the various responses to this routine maintenance item).

If it's all the same to Chevy, I'll be changing my Bolt transaxle fluid around the 60k mile point.
And I'll be posting oil analysis results from my Spark EV when I change it around the same mileage.
 

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If it's all the same to Chevy, I'll be changing my Bolt transaxle fluid around the 60k mile point.
And I'll be posting oil analysis results from my Spark EV when I change it around the same mileage.
And we will all thank you.
 

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I have been servicng my Dad's cars since 1965, and my own since 1972 (a 1965 Rambler American). I have the 2011 Chevy Volt's Owner Manual, the 2015 Chevy Spark EV Owner Manual, and last month I added the 1997 Chevy S-10 Electric Owner Manual to my collection of EV owner manuals and ICE manuals. i only have the factory service manuals for the vehicles I own.

The new 2017 Chevy Bolt EV now has the least amount of scheduled maintenence of ALL and EVERY manual I have read. That is excellent news for me because I travel less than 300 miles a month, or less than 3,500 miles a year. Such scedu;e means that I will be replacing the coolant fluid after more than ten years of use. And just like with the Spark EV, the only "replaceables" are the wiper blades and the cabin air filter. The tires will be the largest replacement cost, as with any other vehicle.

For use DIYers, the Chevy Bolt EV could be the last car we even need to service, and will help save thousands of dollars of servicing costs in its lifetime or ownership because it may even outlive me!
 

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Oh goodlord, not another 'lifetime lube'....
Same as the Prius.
There is no such thing, unless you are talking about the lifetime of ownership that always ends when the warranty runs out.

I started what turned out to be a huge thread after posting my oil analysis results from doing a transaxle oil change at 114k miles on my '10 Prius IV w/solar sunroof.
You wouldn't believe the dark pearlescent crud I drained out, (and the various responses to this routine maintenance item).

If it's all the same to Chevy, I'll be changing my Bolt transaxle fluid around the 60k mile point.
And I'll be posting oil analysis results from my Spark EV when I change it around the same mileage.
You have to admit that the fluids in a hybrid reside in a much higher temperture ambient due to the gas engine heat. In a pure electric, such as the Spark EV and Bolt EV, the temperatures never exceed 160 degrees (unless you are abusing it), so all the fluids will last longer. I have electric tools that are very old, yet have never failed. My oldest is a Craftsman electrtic saw that my Dad bought in 1963. It still works and had no wear, except blade changes.

Electric devices only wear out due to long use or abuse. So if you buy a Bolt EV and treat it as with a regular car, it will last longer than a normal gas car under the same conditions. Obviously it all depends on the environment and road conditions, too. But in my case, where my gas engine cars last over twenty years, the Bolt EV can be my last driving vehicle, and a hybrid or EREV Cadillac hearst will be my last ride!
 

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>.....Electric devices only wear out due to long use or abuse. So if you buy a Bolt EV and treat it as with a regular car, it will last longer than a normal gas car under the same conditions....

>> the Bolt EV can be my last driving vehicle, and a hybrid or EREV Cadillac hearst will be my last ride!
>But we are talking about a transaxle full of gears and bearings,, with one compact 200 HP motor (and no clutches as in the Volt).
Even though the ATF is actively temp controlled, gears and bearings like a clean lube.

>>Funny! We should all be so lucky!
 

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You have to admit that the fluids in a hybrid reside in a much higher temperture ambient due to the gas engine heat. In a pure electric, such as the Spark EV and Bolt EV, the temperatures never exceed 160 degrees (unless you are abusing it), so all the fluids will last longer. I have electric tools that are very old, yet have never failed. My oldest is a Craftsman electrtic saw that my Dad bought in 1963. It still works and had no wear, except blade changes.

Electric devices only wear out due to long use or abuse. So if you buy a Bolt EV and treat it as with a regular car, it will last longer than a normal gas car under the same conditions. Obviously it all depends on the environment and road conditions, too. But in my case, where my gas engine cars last over twenty years, the Bolt EV can be my last driving vehicle, and a hybrid or EREV Cadillac hearst will be my last ride!
The devices that require cooling are different in a pure EV, but that does not negate the significant heat loads of the devices that do.

The battery is the main thing we think about when discussing EV cooling, but it is the power electronics and motor windings that have the most intense cooling requirement. They generate significant high-temperature heat in very small areas. Picture the heat dissipation of transistors processing up to 150,000 watts of power in a box the size of a book. Even at 98% efficiency, that is still over 3,000 watts - the heat output of two plug-in 115 volt space heaters. The same applies to the motor windings, buried deep in the drive unit. And because the power electronics/drive unit glycol cooling loop is NOT connected to the vehicle's refrigerant AC system, the glycol cooling loop has to dissipate all that heat to the "cool" outside air, which can be up to 125 degrees F in hot desert areas. This means the loop temperature could exceed 200 degrees F during a sustained high-speed climb and hot summer outside air conditions.

As usual, GM's thermal management system engineering team has done a bang-up job of handling all these "behind-the-scenes" details to make it easy for us to "think" EV's are inherently simpler, easier-to-maintain machines. But it is the engineering that truly makes them so easy-to-maintain. The attachment below is an excerpt from SAE paper 2016-01-1153 covering the drive unit lube and cooling. The full paper provides an overview of the engineering thought put into the Bolt propulsion system. I encourage all who are curious about the engineering challenges of designing an EV drive system to purchase that paper ($26 for non-members) from the SAE and read it. You will be very, very impressed at the guts behind the Bolt magic.

Bolt drive unit lube and cooling excerpt_Page_5.jpg
 

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For use DIYers, the Chevy Bolt EV could be the last car we even need to service, and will help save thousands of dollars of servicing costs in its lifetime or ownership because it may even outlive me!
Will the success of the electric vehicle be the death knell of the dealership franchise? My understanding is that the Service Department provides the majority of the margin the dealer sees.
 

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Will the success of the electric vehicle be the death knell of the dealership franchise? My understanding is that the Service Department provides the majority of the margin the dealer sees.
Granted that EVs have a lot less moving parts than an ICE, there are still plenty of things that wear out and/or break: suspension, tires, coolant system including hoses/pumps, electronics, 12V battery, recalls, etc. I'm sure the dealership will still be making money on the services department with EVs.
 

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Granted that EVs have a lot less moving parts than an ICE, there are still plenty of things that wear out and/or break: suspension, tires, coolant system including hoses/pumps, electronics, 12V battery, recalls, etc. I'm sure the dealership will still be making money on the services department with EVs.

Yes, wear items do...wear. Items break (age, etc.). And diagnosing EV gremlins is not something a corner mechanic will do. Still, a lot less when you take out all the ICE related items.
 

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I'm surprised none of you caught on the document posted here was a generic cut and paste from every other Chevy automobile manual. It does not appear to be custom written for the Bolt.
 
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