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The Volt battery heater is 1.8 kW - I haven't seen anything about the Bolt unit yet.
The Bolt EV's Rechargeable Energy Storage System (RESS) heater is on a 10A fuse coming from the High Power Distribution Module (HPDM), according to an SAE paper.

At low battery levels, the voltage might be 320V, which means the fuse (breaker?) would go at 3.2kW. Taking 25% off that allows for about 2.5kW heating power into the battery. Just my speculation.
 

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I want to know if this ramp down of the charge rate once the SOC exceeds 50% is a standard thing with all Bolts or not.
 

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I'm not sure I'd say 45kW is "far higher" than BRo's 42kW he briefly saw.
Oh, if you're just talking about peak, then sure. 47-48 kW is the highest I've seen. I thought you were talking about the fact that Bro's is taking forever to ramp up and not actually sustaining >40 kW for any period of time. The limitation for the Bolt EV right now is the amperage of the stations. The chargers are technically 50-60 kW, but that is because they are 500 V. The highest realistic charge rate that a Bolt EV can expect on the current fast chargers is 380 V @ 125 A (47-48 kW), which I see regularly across much of the charge window ( <5% SOC to 55% SOC). Until 150-200 A public chargers are built, it's anyone's guess what the Bolt's max charge rate is.

Bro's case, however, seems specific to his car. I'm not sure of anyone else who is having similar issues. Where else have you seen these charging rates talked about or displayed?
 

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Are these charging rates sufficient to allow long distance travel? In laymens terms how long would a charging session take to charge from a SOC of say 20% to say 90%? As a Volt owner I just don't use ANY charging away from my home so I need someone to translate these 5 pages into a raw number.
 

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Are these charging rates sufficient to allow long distance travel? In laymens terms how long would a charging session take to charge from a SOC of say 20% to say 90%? As a Volt owner I just don't use ANY charging away from my home so I need someone to translate these 5 pages into a raw number.
Depends on your sense of adventure and patience. Charging from 20% to 90% will take 75-80 minutes on a 125A (nominal 50kW) charger under ideal conditions, based on what I've seen publicly reported.
 

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...We also saw the Michigan Bolt EV that got in the fender bender with 0% battery conditioning at 17 F, but I've never witnessed it down to the high 20s F. My guess is, somewhere between 10 F and 20 F, we'll start to see battery conditioning.
TMS is only going to display power usage when the battery gets cold (or hot).

If a Bolt is plugged in outside at 0*F and then driven for hours in this condition it still may never need TMS.
The battery pack is warm due to usage/current draw while driving.

If you leave it unplugged overnight in the very cold (or hot) then drive it, that is when TMS will use power to make the battery go to it's 'happy temp range'. But only during the first part of the drive until the battery temp is happy.

Which technically means you started driving with an 'unhappy' battery temp, correct?
 

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Are these charging rates sufficient to allow long distance travel? In laymens terms how long would a charging session take to charge from a SOC of say 20% to say 90%? As a Volt owner I just don't use ANY charging away from my home so I need someone to translate these 5 pages into a raw number.
I know of folks that drove across the country with a Tesla Roadster, so it's certainly possible (in that case, drive a couple hundred miles, then find a RV park and charge for several hours and repeat.)

If you're looking for a roadtrip without sacrifices/delays, you really need to average upwards of 80 kW. That way a 45 minute meal break nets you close to two hundred driving miles (depending on speed/efficiency of course,) and a fifteen minute snack and restroom break can add almost an hour of driving.
 

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If you're looking for a roadtrip without sacrifices/delays, you really need to average upwards of 80 kW. That way a 45 minute meal break nets you close to two hundred driving miles (depending on speed/efficiency of course,) and a fifteen minute snack and restroom break can add almost an hour of driving.
Sounds like the trips from Michigan to Florida my octagenarian friends make. Three days to travel 1200 miles.
Where I live the Volt is definitely the better choice, there isn't a charging station in Michigan north of the Detroit metro area.
 

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If you are eating at a regular (not a "fast-food") restaurant then its likely to take you at least 45 minutes and maybe an hour to walk there from your car and back plus ordering, getting food, paying the bill etc. According to GM, an hour can add about 160 miles of range. If you start your day with a fully charged battery and do a couple of hour charging stops that should be sufficient for a 400+ mile drive which is as much as I usually want to do in one day.

This is certainly a slower charging rate than a Tesla but on actual road trips this won't necessarily be a big disadvantage. Tesla drivers now have to pay a penalty (at busier locations) at the rate of $24 an hour unless they unplug and move their cars at a Supercharger within 5 minutes of charge completion. This means they either pay some partial penalty or they may have to jump up in the middle of eating to move their car. Bolt owners can eat a more relaxing meal.
 

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Sounds like the trips from Michigan to Florida my octagenarian friends make. Three days to travel 1200 miles.
Where I live the Volt is definitely the better choice, there isn't a charging station in Michigan north of the Detroit metro area.
Well, Tesla has three Superchargers north of Detroit - Grand Rapids, Bay City, and Cadillac. Plugshare doesn't show any other DCFC in the area, though, except for a Nissan dealer in Grand Rapids who is installing a CHAdeMO. Kinda surprised there isn't more, given how many CCS stations folks keep saying are around. It'd be hard going all electric there unless you go Tesla.
 

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..... >Tesla drivers now have to pay a penalty (at busier locations) at the rate of $24 an hour unless they unplug and move their cars at a Supercharger within 5 minutes of charge completion. This means they either pay some partial penalty or they may have to jump up in the middle of eating to move their car.
>>Bolt owners can eat a more relaxing meal.
> I like this plan. We have to consider the future. Don't be rude.

>> A Bolt owner knowingly letting his car sit totally charged at a DCFC is BAD EV Etiquette.
Even staying beyond 80% if someone else is waiting is not nice, unless you really need it on a road trip.
 

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I asked the EVTRIPPLANNER site developer if they were going to add the BOLT to their list of cars and he said yes as soon as they can start gathering metadata. Right now I use the Tesla MS60 as a rough guide to plan trips and for my family of the three trips I make annually I can only drive TWO of them with a Tesla MS60 and their current SC network in temps above 25 degrees. The S85 makes it easier but I can't afford one.

I don't consider their Destination network as a reliable charging option as it could be occupied by another Tesla when I need it.

Hopefully CSS/DCFC stations grow more rapidly.
 

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With current charging infrastructure that is available, the Bolt EV adds about two hours over what my Volt would require for a 500 mile trip. Part of that is the charging rates, part is charger setup (thanks EVgo for the automatic shutoffs), and part is charger placement. I normally like to make one stop for food and fuel and possibly a second bathroom break with my Volt. My Bolt EV requires three stops total for 45 minutes to an hour. With a better, faster infrastructure, the Bolt EV should only require two 1-hour stops for that 500 mile trip. Also note that these are winter numbers (which don't really affect the Volt), so I have to recharge the Bolt EV more times and for longer.

As the infrastructure improves, we'll know more. But from my experiences, if you start with a full battery, you should be able to complete a 500 mile trip with an overall average speed of 50-55 mph (< 10 hours total).
 

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If you are eating at a regular (not a "fast-food") restaurant then its likely to take you at least 45 minutes and maybe an hour to walk there from your car and back plus ordering, getting food, paying the bill etc. According to GM, an hour can add about 160 miles of range. If you start your day with a fully charged battery and do a couple of hour charging stops that should be sufficient for a 400+ mile drive which is as much as I usually want to do in one day.
Bro has reported there are some DCFC chargers that have a 30min cap...

With the "more relaxing meal" you need so many ducks in a row, a restaurant you want has be near a charging station, the restaurant has to be open (early morning breakfast? Late evenings?), not have too long of a wait, etc...

Many on the TM forums reported they'd rather call ahead a to go order from their fav nearby restaurant even if it's not in walking distance to the SC, pickup and pay for the food, use the restroom, head to the supercharger and eat on site either at the car or a nearby facility...

Personally I'm if going on a 300+ mile journey which requires an hour of charging, I'd much rather spend that time in the gym then sitting in a restaurant...
 

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42000W/125A = 336V

We really need to find the PID for pack voltage, but I suspect 42kW is all the charger was capable of at ~ 50% State-of-Charge. And we know from ladogaboy that the car tapers to 35kW around 55% SOC.

A shame the pack wasn't configured to run at higher voltage. Having a nominal pack voltage closer to 400V would make a big difference during the CC phase of charging.
 

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Are these charging rates sufficient to allow long distance travel? In laymens terms how long would a charging session take to charge from a SOC of say 20% to say 90%? As a Volt owner I just don't use ANY charging away from my home so I need someone to translate these 5 pages into a raw number.
Unless the amps are raised on the CCS chargers, I don't see how it's sanely possible. I'm used to 100-120kW charging on my Tesla and would seriously question my choice of vehicle and technology if I was getting 20-48kW charging. We knew the Bolt wasn't going to charge as fast as a Tesla, but this is insanely slow. Unacceptable. I would be lighting up the phones and the internet with complaints, if that was my car.

Sure, we can say "it's the amps of the charger" all we want, but GM and LG designed it with that cell geometry, which lowered the voltage. Did they not research what the most common CCS stations are delivering? Where are these mythical CCS stations that can deliver the maximum amount of charge to the Bolt?
 

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If you are eating at a regular (not a "fast-food") restaurant then its likely to take you at least 45 minutes and maybe an hour to walk there from your car and back plus ordering, getting food, paying the bill etc. According to GM, an hour can add about 160 miles of range. If you start your day with a fully charged battery and do a couple of hour charging stops that should be sufficient for a 400+ mile drive which is as much as I usually want to do in one day.

This is certainly a slower charging rate than a Tesla but on actual road trips this won't necessarily be a big disadvantage. Tesla drivers now have to pay a penalty (at busier locations) at the rate of $24 an hour unless they unplug and move their cars at a Supercharger within 5 minutes of charge completion. This means they either pay some partial penalty or they may have to jump up in the middle of eating to move their car. Bolt owners can eat a more relaxing meal.
Considering how many fat chargers we've been seeing that have a 30 minute shutoff piled on top, someone's gonna be getting up to deal with things anyway... ;)
 
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