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Not bad, but I just charged my Spark EV at 45kw yesterday that has 3x+ smaller battery than Bolt. Chevy should have known that fast charging was going to be hot topic, and Tesla chargers dominate Bolt's big time. System engineers could have specified battery pack to have 100V higher pack voltage. That would have allowed Bolt to use 500V charger and it would have given ~15kw faster charge rate. Hopefully next battery architecture will have higher battery pack voltage.
 

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Not bad, but I just charged my Spark EV at 45kw yesterday that has 3x+ smaller battery than Bolt. Chevy should have known that fast charging was going to be hot topic, and Tesla chargers dominate volt's big time. System engineers could have specified battery pack to have 100V higher pack voltage. That would have allowed Bolt to use 500V charger and it would have given ~15kw faster charge rate. Hopefully next battery architecture will have higher battery pack voltage.
Actually, the reason Tesla models charge faster is the amperage, not the volts. While they do have a slightly higher pack voltage, it's not actually that much more. In fact, the Model 3 base appears to have a lower pack voltage than the Bolt EV, and the Model 3 Long Range seems to have a slightly higher pack voltage. It's the fact that Tesla models seem to push close to 300 A or more below 15% SOC that gives them such high peak charging rates.

As for the Bolt EV, it's anyone's guess why GM software restricted the charge rates so much. My guess is that it was a combination of bean counters and accountants trying to mitigate battery replacements under warranty. They probably felt that ~ 1 hour to 80% was good enough (or at least the best balance). As EV drivers, we know that's not the case, but they probably couldn't see the value.
 

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How did the person at Vestby know that the battery conditioning was drawing 3-4 kW? How were they measuring it?
These questions are answered in post #30.

If it was the difference between the tower and the car's display, doesn't that corroborate what I'm saying?
No. The charger output is dictated by the battery voltage and requested amperage by the car. If the car requests 150A and the battery voltage is 360V, the charger outputs 54kW. This is independent of how the car uses it.

In the example at Vestby, the car used 8-11A (3-4kW) for battery conditioning and the remaining ~140A (50-51kW) for battery charging. As the battery voltage increased to 370V, the power output of the charger increased to 55.5kW but the battery conditioning I'm sure was still going (using 8-11A or 3-4kW) and the remaining power available for the battery was 52kW (still at ~140A).

Bottomline, the power used for battery conditioning appears to be subtracted from the 150A requested by the car before the first taper.
 

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As I recall.CCS protocol will upgrade to allow 350KW. CCS is just getting into the game, but it's a game they will win : American/Euro.German automakers all use CCS and I've heard that LEAF will ditch CHAdeMO and go with CCS. I've also heard that CHAdeMO is on the way out. As far as I know, not one single automaker took up Elon Musk's desperate offer of "Open source" Supercharger protocol.
 
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