GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Yeah, you should hear all the idiots who use the term throttle pedal on diesels, or gas pedal. Diesels have neither throttles or gasoline.

Wait. The term "give it some gas" can apply to virtually anything.

With EV's we can't even use the term Loud Pedal.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
772 Posts
The brake pedal is also an accelerator: the direction of the acceleration vector is towards the rear of the car. And most of the time, the brake pedal has nothing to do with the actual brakes; it is a variable regen controller.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,089 Posts
I started out thinking of it in the English way, as an 'accelerator'. But really, isn't this splitting hairs? it's common usage to call the pedal on the right the 'gas' pedal, and anyone would know what he means.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,201 Posts
It is the GO pedal and the other one is the stop pedal!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,992 Posts
Wouldn't the correct term be "motor controller"?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,634 Posts
Accelerator pedal makes the most sense to me since it controls acceleration. The other pedal is the service brake pedal, but even it includes motor control. They are both becoming "soft" buttons/controls that may be programmed as desired.

Everyone knows what a gas pedal does, it is an incorrect term but really no need for anything other than a gentle reminder that it is not a gas pedal. I am sure he has been using the term for years.

Just as my phone does not have an LCD display (liquid crystal display display), it actually has an AMOLED display, but people still refer to it as an LCD. Completely wrong terminology for my Samsung, but people will know what you are referring to. It is fine for an Apple phone. I am careful to use generic term of display or monitor (more often use that one with a camera).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,053 Posts
I quickly got used to the paddles on the 2017 Volt. What would you call them? I believe most of us have gone down the 'Regen paddle' mode. But don't they really 'brake' for us. I know that I quickly developed the habit to, when I was ready to put my foot on the brake, put my fingers to those paddles instead. Well, that is a new paradigm, so naming it won't be so tough.

Now I have my Model X. I thought I would miss those paddles. I don't. Tesla made the 'Go' pedal even more responsive than the Volt is...good thing, since the brake pedal really is the brake pedal. No regen at all on Tesla brake pedal. Just friction. With this concept in mind, you definitely want to train yourself to properly use that 'Go' pedal, since you merely WASTE energy every time you resort to actual (friction) braking. But since the 'Go' pedal is used just as much for decelerating as it is for accelerating, it DEFINITELY needs a new name, even 'accelerator' pedal misses the mark, just as much as 'gas' pedal does. You still have a brake pedal, but then the other pedal is what...maybe the 'operator' pedal? We may have our answer in a few decades, particularly after people look back in time and realize how primitive gas was with all the noise, smell, etc. Maybe no one will want to call it a 'gas' pedal.

Or maybe, people will just FORGET what that meant COMPLETELY a century or two from now, but still use the term. After all, we still use the term, 'lock, stock and barrel' even though virtually NOBODY knows that its meaning of the entirety of something comes from when we used flintlock rifles...as in (flint) lock, stock and gun barrel. If you ask the average person on the street, what the phrase means and from whence it came, I am sure most responders think the barrel is of the wooden sort, for holding liquids- which couldn't be further from the truth.

I know of no one who uses a flintlock rifle...even those hunters who like a challenge with a single shot, and the complexity that goes along with it to reload, use 'muzzle loaders'. When we stopped using muzzle loading artillery, we started using breech loading cannon. But now everything is loaded at the breech, so we no longer even use the term. 'Muzzle' loading would be used to describe things other than the standard. In this case, that primary pedal in the car just becomes THE pedal, and the OTHER pedal would be known as the brake pedal simply to distinguish it from THE pedal.

After you have driven with the aggressive deceleration of the Tesla brake pedal, you realize it is not a far stretch at all to just do away with that second pedal, and do all actions with just one pedal. As it is, my Tesla brake pedal is just the 'STOP' pedal because I only use it when I come to a complete stop, such as at a traffic light. In that case, I push a bit further on the 'stop' pedal to engage 'hold' mode. 'Hold' mode is kind of like a temporary 'park' mode. I make sure the 'H' is visible on my dash, and then I can relax and take my foot off the pedal for the minute or more I might be sitting at that light. [The 'brake' lights remain energized in 'hold' mode.] To 'go', I simply put my foot on THE pedal and 'go'. And what happens if you don't eventually put your foot on THE pedal? The car shifts to real 'Park'. You really have to train yourself that putting the car in 'Park' vs 'hold' is a separate, additional action, since the car sounds the same whether it is 'Park', 'Hold' or 'Go'...or 'Car off'. Yes, we need to COMPLETELY adjust our paradigms, as a silent electric car can be a deadly one if you haven't trained yourself to dissociate noise from operation... because a silent electric car is still capable of moving, whether by gravity or otherwise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
Seriously, guys, it really is called a throttle. The term is generic enough to include all forms of propulsion.

throt·tle
ˈTHrädl/
noun
noun: throttle; plural noun: throttles
1.
a device controlling the flow of fuel or power to an engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
And, yes, an electric motor is a type of engine, just like a square is a type of rectangle.

en·gine
ˈenjən/
noun
noun: engine; plural noun: engines
1.
a machine with moving parts that converts power into motion.



If we truly limit the term motor to electric propulsion devices and limit engines to expanding gasses, then owners of ICE vehicles have been sending license and registration money to the Department of MOTOR Vehicles when they don't need to. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,130 Posts
Seriously, guys, it really is called a throttle. The term is generic enough to include all forms of propulsion.

throt·tle
ˈTHrädl/
noun
noun: throttle; plural noun: throttles
1.
a device controlling the flow of fuel or power to an engine.
Sorry, not on a Volt according to GM :)

http://www.rockauto.com/en/moreinfo.php?pk=6309843&cc=1501836&jsn=429
http://www.gmpartsgiant.com/parts/gm-pedal-asm-accel-13331928.html

PEDAL ASM-ACCEL
ACCEL is short for Accelerator :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
803 Posts
I vote "gas pedal"!

When the pedal was connected directly to the carburetor (or steam valve), the meaning was unambiguous. Modern ICE cars (and increasingly, motorcycles) are fly-by-wire. That pedal now only sends a signal to the ECU, which interprets it as a torque command. The computer decides what combination of mixture, ignition timing, gear (for AT), cam position, rpm, injector timing and duration, manifold pressure (turbo), and yes, throttle needed to deliver the commanded torque.

The title of this thread is nonsense.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
7,289 Posts
Much ado about nothing.

Average Joe will call it a gas pedal, and if you want to connect with them, no problem calling it a gas pedal.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top