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Slow and steady wins the race. The Bolt AV drives like your grandma, minus all the horrifying mistakes.
Although I think your statement is really intended as a (yet another) jab against Tesla, I'm referring to AV vehicles in general when I say that slow and steady (safe) driving is and will continue to cause issues with human drivers as A) humans become more acclimated to and recognize AV's and B) become more aggressive towards them since they know "they won't do anything if I.....".

There will have to be consequences or, for example, an EV will have major issues at a 4 way stop when the humans at the other 3 positions perform "normal" rolling stops (California stop) putting the AV in a continued hold pattern.

Nearly 100% of accidents with AV's are the human drivers fault; most from just getting to close to these (slow) vehicles. Slow and steady will not win the race unless there is an even playing field.
 

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I was interested in what we would learn from this event. Now we know. It works but ever so slowly. That's not bad actually. The technology is moving along much faster than many predicted. Having a vehicle which will autonomously drive in San Francisco is no mean feat. Far more difficult than most other areas.

The only thing about the article is the final line. Rather than saying "drivers need to be patient" it should have said "riders need to be patient". :D
 

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It does not seem surprising that initial versions of this would err on the side of slowness and caution. That will no doubt improve over time. If Chevy had gone the other way and made it zippy and aggressive, the reporter would have had a heart attack due to the normal skepticism of a new and unfamiliar technology. In that case his article would have concluded that we should all stay from this technology.

Even if the ultimate version of this is slower than a human driver, which seems likely since humans sometimes bend the laws to speed, take little short cuts, pass illegally, roll through stops, run "orange" lights, pull out when there is not really enough room, etc., I think people will still be thrilled to be able to give up the driving and instead text, eat, work, shave, put on makeup, internet surf, watch movies, etc. A few extra minutes in the car will be no problem whatsoever.
 

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The Car and Driver write up is definitely more informational. Exciting. Hopefully it will be quarters and not years.
 

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My favorite insight from the C & D article:

"According to executive chief engineer Andrew Farah, the team followed two parallel paths."

Wow - so that is what Andrew's been up to lately - what a list of accomplishments -

Chief Engineer - Volt (Gen 1)
Chief Engineer - Volt (Gen 2)
Executive Chief Engineer -Autonomous Bolt EV

Every vehicle he engineers moves the goal posts for electrified automotive technology. Congratulations, Andrew.
 
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