GM Volt Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,782 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,661 Posts
I own a whole 17 shares.......maybe I'll hang out with him at a future shareholders meeting.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,416 Posts
Tesla may indeed prove to be a good investment, albeit very risky and without question volatile. But have a good look at Ron Baron before you go following him. A few excerpts from Market Watch:

But as bright as the outlook may have seemed in, say, 1998, it's now 2012, and the past few years have been a grimmer story. Since 2007, Baron Growth has been just about even with its benchmarks, and other funds in his family are also mediocre performers. Most money managers, of course, have struggled to thrive since the financial crisis. Baron's bad times, however, look even gloomier compared with his high-flying past, and investors are voting with their feet: Shareholders have withdrawn money from Baron Funds more than three times as fast as they have from stock funds in general. And critics, including some former customers, are questioning Baron on everything from his strategy to his fees -- one thing about his funds that still ranks near the top. "He seems willing to kill the goose that laid the golden egg," says Chris Davis, Morningstar's senior mutual fund analyst.
................
Since 2007, Baron Partners lost 32 percent of its assets to client withdrawals, while investors pulled nearly 15 percent out of Baron Growth. Some of the shift has been part of a general equity phobia among investors, and that's what Baron attributes the withdrawals to. But the exodus has been more pronounced at Baron Funds; the company as a whole suffered an outflow of 18 percent of assets over the past four years, while overall, U.S. stock mutual funds reported only a 6 percent decline, according to Morningstar. Among those abandoning ship is Art Cohen, a Chicago financial adviser who oversees $400 million. Cohen is in the process of pulling 80 client accounts he has had for around 10 years with Baron Partners. By making big leveraged bets, Baron is "in effect saying 'I know better than everyone else,'" says Cohen, whose clients are no longer comfortable with that risk.
I pulled the more skeptical paragraphs from their article on purpose - I'm conservative about these things and pay close attention to the downside.

Read the full article here: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/can-billionaire-ron-baron-stay-afloat-in-todays-market-1337096190689
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,156 Posts
If we're to believe this guy, he has a fabulous stock opportunity and, instead of buying more shares, he's going to announce to the world what a great opportunity he's found. Funny. Very funny. Reminds you of the telemarketing made famous by movie "Wolf of Wall Street".

Tesla stock is much like Valeant stock, more chain letter than anything.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
301 Posts
If we're to believe this guy, he has a fabulous stock opportunity and, instead of buying more shares, he's going to announce to the world what a great opportunity he's found. Funny. Very funny. Reminds you of the telemarketing made famous by movie "Wolf of Wall Street".

Tesla stock is much like Valeant stock, more chain letter than anything.
Maybe you can become a billionaire investor and announce to the world you are shorting the stock...Oh wait.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
14,156 Posts
Maybe you can become a billionaire investor and announce to the world you are shorting the stock...Oh wait.
What's funny is that you would likely have been much better off investing with me that with Mr. Baron, whose funds likely have underperformed the S&P 500 net of his 2/20 fees. Plus you obviously have no idea about shorting. As Keynes, who was likely the best investor of all time, pointed out, the market can stay irrational longer than you can stay solvent. That doesn't preclude recognizing that Tesla stock very much resembles a chain letter. Anyone so naive as to listen to anyone telling you what a great investment opportunity they have for you deserves to be separated from their money. Wall Street types are not known for thier altruism of announcing great investment opportunities so others can benefit. :)

One also has to wonder why this guy is still in the game. Reminds me of the 70 year old surgeon who for financial reasons is still active in the OR.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top