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(Sorry if this is a FAQ, but I am new.)

I've had my 2012 Volt for 4 months and a month ago I got a Level 2 SPX charger installed at home. Although I have no data to back this up, it just seems to me that I am getting better EV milegae now even though my driving is about the same. (Yes I realize it is a little warmer now too). Is there any explanation or this just wishful thinking on my part?
 

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Wishful thinking. Temperature can make a difference, but it's also possible you're learning how to change your driving to maximize your range. The rate of charging won't affect range.
 

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(Sorry if this is a FAQ, but I am new.)

I've had my 2012 Volt for 4 months and a month ago I got a Level 2 SPX charger installed at home. Although I have no data to back this up, it just seems to me that I am getting better EV milegae now even though my driving is about the same. (Yes I realize it is a little warmer now too). Is there any explanation or this just wishful thinking on my part?
Better mileage now than four months ago? I certainly believe that. Better mileage because of a level 2 charger, not so much. The Level 2 charger is fractionally more efficient - to get the nominal 10.4 kWh into the battery takes 12-12.5 kWh from the wall instead of 12.5-13 kWh from the wall (mainly because the car runs the TMS and charger parasitic loads for less time,) but once power is in the car, it doesn't matter where the power came from.

Temperature makes a big difference on these cars, however. In colder conditions the battery has less energy to deliver at the same state of charge, chemically (which is part of why the engine sometimes comes on at 9.6 kW used in the winter, for instance.) Colder temps mean more load, too - tires don't roll as easily, lubricating oil is more viscous, requiring more power to turn. Even the air is denser, needing more force to push it aside.

But while all of the above are real, they are all small compared to the impact of HVAC. The electric heater can draw 6.5 kW. This is enough power to move the car at something like 40 mph, potentially being burned continuously without moving the car an inch. In theory, that can drain the traction battery in about 90 minutes by itself...

In cold wet climates, it gets worse, because the Volt uses the A/C to dehumidify automatically (this function respects the Comfort/Eco/fan-only settings, but is otherwise outside of user control AFAIK.) So if it's cold and wet out, the car can draw over 9kW without moving. The impact on electric range is huge (though the cost is still well below driving anything on gas, including the Volt.)
 

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I've always used a level 2 charger, never level 1. Starting when I got my Volt in October of last year, the estimated range on a fresh charge stayed fairly steady, then dipped in the winter months. Over the past month, with the warmer weather, the estimated range on a fresh charge has started to climb, all on a level 2 charger. I now get estimated ranges on a fresh charge of 47 to 49 miles(!) However, I drive like an LOL (little old lady).

LOL (laughing out loud). :)

As MrEnergyCzar says, however, level 2 is a bit more efficient a charger. Once charged, though, range is not affected by HOW the battery was charged.
 

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You use less KWH to charge the Volt with level 2. I think it's about a .5 KWH difference.

MrEnergyCzar
It's probably closer to 0.8 kWh, maybe even 1 kWh depending on the temperature.
 
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