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Discussion Starter #1
I have 2 distinct options given the proximity of both my range plug (which is directly backing onto my garage, so basically I'd only have to drill a hole through the wall behind the range and I'm in the garage), or my dryer circuit which is now actually powering my pool pump. Our dryer was converted to gas long ago, so the dryer circuit was dormant, and when we upgraded to a 220v pool pump I repurposed it.

The range circuit is currently wired with 6/3, for 50 amps.

The dryer circuit is wired with 10/3, for 30 amps.

I'm looking at the two options from this perspective:

For our 2012 I won't need more than [email protected]

Range circuit option: I'll have to run a short length of 6/3 through the wall and then install a pony panel with a 20/30a breaker (depending on how future proof I decide to make things I guess, but I'll probably opt for 30) and then 10/3 for about a 30 foot run to the opposite wall where I'll want the EVSE. Yes, I could just run 6/3 all the way (and theoretically have 50A for future proofing) but the cost is quite high for 6/3 wiring - a pony panel, breaker, and smaller wire constitutes a notable saving in the end. And given it's a shared circuit in the end I could never get 50a out of it anyways without constantly popping the downstream breaker, so it's a waste.

Positives: Easy, direct access via a simple hold in the wall behind the range, theoretically future proof up to 50amps but it'd have to be rewired straight to the panel (vs shared with the range) to accomplish that.

Negatives: Not sure exactly how many amps the range draws under what would be a moderate to heavy load. It's a double oven model with the standard 4 glass top elements, so I see it being theoretically possible that between the range and the 16 amps the Volt will be drawing it could trip the 50A circuit. Could unknowingly be exceeding the 80% continuous load guideline without knowing it, although it would be only under exceedingly rare circumstances, and from what I can find online 6/3 can actually carry 60A circuits, so the 80% rule still means it can carry 48 amps without any wiring issues, but potential breaker tripping issues...again, under exceedingly rare circumstances where the Volt is charging flat out and both ovens and all 4 elements are burning on the stove.

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Dryer circuit option: Direct patch into the existing 10/3 in the basement straight out to where I'll install the plug. No need for pony panel as I won't be stepping down the wiring anywhere.

Positives: Easy, pool pump is a variable speed model that only draws 10.3 amps when running at 100%, and we NEVER run it at 100% - most of the time it's running at about 30% or less, so the peak draw is only 4 or 5 amps at peak, leaving 25 amps for the EVSE. At those loads (pool pump @5A and EVSE @16A) things are comfortably within the 80% constant load guideline still.

Negatives: I'd have to lock out the pool pump from exceeding an RPM that would cause it to draw more than 8A otherwise, theoretically, it could exceed the 80% safety range of the 10/3 wiring. However, it does have a lockout ability that can be configured to ensure that the combination of the EVSE running flat out and the pool pump running don't exceed 24 amps (80%) at any point.

At this point I'm leaning towards utilizing the dryer circuit...unless anyone can give me a compelling reason to opt for the range circuit.

I will probably wire for 30a to the garage even though we only need 16. If we do step up to a higher amp requirement in the future I'll probably get an electrician in to add a full blown pony panel directly off the main panel at that point.
 

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Your 2012 will never draw more than 14 amps (actually just slightly less). So even if your pool pump ran 100% 24 hours a day you will never draw more than 24.3 amps with both running. The only thing to consider is if you have wire running more than 50ft from your panel. Otherwise it should be fine.

And you could do something like this
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?282593-2-Volts-charge-off-split-circuit
 

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I personally went with the range option for myself as I'm in an apartment and didn't want to fork out to have a 220 line in a rented space. Theoretically you could use 1 possibly 2 burners without running into an issue while charging, but what you can also do to eliminate drawing too much power at once through the circuit is to have the Volt charge on it's built in timer. Set it up to charge during times when you know you aren't going to be cooking (after 8?). With the pool pump option, if that is running on a timer, setting up the charge timer on the Volt could be another option to ensure it doesn't coincide with what your pump timer is set, if in fact it is set on a timer. I think either option would be viable for the lower power draw that the Volt takes (3.6kW) vs. something that takes 7.2 or higher. Realistically I think it's more of a matter of what is easiest for you and what you're comfortable with.
 

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I would use the pump circuit since the load can be controlled with timers. The range circuit should remain dedicated.

What I did in a similar situation is replace the range with gas. I then repurposed the 50-amp circuit to a garage sub-panel including a 40-amp EVSE drop.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
How hard would it be to just add a dedicated line to your service panel?
There's one empty breaker slot for a 15A circuit, so that wouldn't be too hard.

For a 220v circuit however, there's zero options with the existing panel, hence a pony panel would be needed. If I was going to get into the added cost of adding a pony panel, then doing so via the range circuit option would probably be what I'd opt for in the end, but at this point I'm leaning towards using the dryer circuit and simply sharing it with the pool pump. Since the huge majority of the time the pool pump is running at such low RPM (the whole reason I installed a variable speed, to reduce the electricity bills) it's drawing under 750 watts, sometimes as low as a few hundred watts...so the majority of the 30A capability on that line is sitting unused.
 

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There's one empty breaker slot for a 15A circuit, so that wouldn't be too hard.

For a 220v circuit however, there's zero options with the existing panel, hence a pony panel would be needed. If I was going to get into the added cost of adding a pony panel, then doing so via the range circuit option would probably be what I'd opt for in the end, but at this point I'm leaning towards using the dryer circuit and simply sharing it with the pool pump. Since the huge majority of the time the pool pump is running at such low RPM (the whole reason I installed a variable speed, to reduce the electricity bills) it's drawing under 750 watts, sometimes as low as a few hundred watts...so the majority of the 30A capability on that line is sitting unused.
You might be able to squeeze some of your existing circuits into a twin 15A or 20A breaker where they put two switches in the space of one switch, by doing that, you can free up space for a 220v circuit across phases.

Something like this https://www.amazon.com/QO1515C-MINI...1173134&sr=8-4&keywords=Square+d+twin+breaker
 

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Most manufacturers also have thin breakers available which are half the size of regular ones. They are about 1/2 an inch as opposed to one inch.
 
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