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When Georgia repealed its generous $5,000 tax credit on electric vehicles in July 2015, and instead slapped a $200 registration fee on electric cars, sales quickly tumbled.

In the month before the repeal, nearly 1,300 electric vehicles were sold in the state. By August, those sales had all but evaporated — to just 97 cars.

It was a hint of what would come.

Today, the economic incentives that have helped electric vehicles gain a toehold in America are under attack, state by state. In some states, there is a move to repeal tax credits for battery-powered vehicles or to let them expire. And in at least nine states, including liberal-leaning ones like Illinois and conservative-leaning ones like Indiana, lawmakers have introduced bills that would levy new fees on those who own electric cars.

The state actions could put the business of electric vehicles, already rocky, on even more precarious footing. That is particularly true as gas prices stay low, and as the Trump administration appears set to give the nascent market much less of a hand.

One can read the rest of the article at the following link...
https://www.nytimes.com/2017/03/11/business/energy-environment/electric-cars-hybrid-tax-credits.html
 

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well if they don't pay fuel taxes the should pay usage fees. plus I never will believe giving rebates to buyers of luxury cars makes sense. the state and federal rebates should have had a price limit on the vehicle it could apply to
 

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well if they don't pay fuel taxes the should pay usage fees. plus I never will believe giving rebates to buyers of luxury cars makes sense. the state and federal rebates should have had a price limit on the vehicle it could apply to
http://evworld.com/blogs.cfm?blogid=1422

Hatred and stupidity should not write tax code.
 

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http://evworld.com/blogs.cfm?blogid=1422

Hatred and stupidity should not write tax code.
Yet the author doesn't seem to understand how efficiency numbers work.

ev world said:
To show you what I mean let’s take a Chevy Bolt for an example. The Bolt is capable of 119 mpg e in combined driving. What would this car pay per year at the rate of 12,000 miles per year of driving? The answer is 12,000/119 = 100.84 gallons x 0.286 = $28.84. That is a far cry less than the assessed fixed fee of $75 per year.
That 119 MPGe presumes 100% efficiency. But no gas burner on the planet gets anywhere NEAR that. Typically, it's about 35-40% highway and about 30% city due low or changing RPMs and idling time for traffic and stoplights. So if you take 119 MPGe to mean what it REALLY means (about 40 Miles per gallon burned) then that's 12,000/40 = 300 gallons x 0.286 = $85.80 in gas taxes, and that $75 looks like a really good ballpark figure on the part of the taxman.
 

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The lack of paying fuel taxes is going to have to be addressed. As the number of ev's grow it will have an impact on our governments ability to maintain road infrastructure. I know Colorado is already looking at paying a tax per mile driven. In the long run that is probably the fairest tax, but implementation without infringing on privacy may be tough. Self reporting won't work well.

On a side note, am I the only one who hates mpge? I think this is such a bs number and has no real bearing on anything. Ev's use kW or kWh. Our fuel is paid for in kWh. Why not talk in those terms instead of some made up number than means nothing. I mean do we talk battery size in gallon equivalent? Do we say a volt has a .5 gE battery? Or a bolt has a 1.9 ge battery? Or do we discuss the cost of electricity as $3.52 ge?
 

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http://evworld.com/blogs.cfm?blogid=1422

Hatred and stupidity should not write tax code.
Or get elected to office...

I for one really miss the sweet Illinois 10% EV rebate off of the base MSRP (capped at $4k) as I probably wouldn't have bought the volt when I did without the state rebate, Fed tax credit, GM rebate, dealer discount, dealer pay-you-state-tax discount, and GM Card rebate. On the other hand, if the Fed tax credit disappears tomorrow, that puts Ford and VW on equal footing with Tesla and GM who are coming up on 200k vehicles fast. 4 years later, I think my next vehicle might be an ICEr, not because of the possible loss of government subsidies, but because nobody has built the ultimate vehicle for my needs without charging an arm and a leg (Cadillac, Volvo, and Tesla are the closest, but they cost too much). My volt is a great commuter car for me, not a great family car because of the cramped rear seats and cargo area.
 

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I have no quibble with paying a fee to support the roads, what I object to is the money not being used to pay for the road. States often raid their highway fund to pay other obligations, usually brought about by irresponsible tax cuts.

Also, if we are not going to give tax credits for EVs, great. Please eliminate all subsidies enjoyed by the coal/gas/oil/nuclear industries as well.

Sauce for the gander.
 

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The lack of paying fuel taxes is going to have to be addressed. As the number of ev's grow it will have an impact on our governments ability to maintain road infrastructure. I know Colorado is already looking at paying a tax per mile driven. In the long run that is probably the fairest tax, but implementation without infringing on privacy may be tough. Self reporting won't work well.

On a side note, am I the only one who hates mpge? I think this is such a bs number and has no real bearing on anything. Ev's use kW or kWh. Our fuel is paid for in kWh. Why not talk in those terms instead of some made up number than means nothing. I mean do we talk battery size in gallon equivalent? Do we say a volt has a .5 gE battery? Or a bolt has a 1.9 ge battery? Or do we discuss the cost of electricity as $3.52 ge?
When I registered my Volt in Douglas County yesterday there was a $50 PHEV fee. I looked up the statute and $30 goes to CDOT.
 

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I have no quibble with paying a fee to support the roads, what I object to is the money not being used to pay for the road. States often raid their highway fund to pay other obligations, usually brought about by irresponsible tax cuts.

Also, if we are not going to give tax credits for EVs, great. Please eliminate all subsidies enjoyed by the coal/gas/oil/nuclear industries as well.

Sauce for the gander.
You mean the annual worldwide oil industry self reported $500 Trillion subsidy? We can't do that - it would give renewable energy an honest chance to destroy an entire industry.
 

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I will be happy to pay more in excise taxes for transportation if I am paid compensation for producing less atmospheric carbon than others driving internal combustion engine vehicles and flying around in Air Force One.
 

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When I registered my Volt in Douglas County yesterday there was a $50 PHEV fee. I looked up the statute and $30 goes to CDOT.
Still less than I paid to the state last year. I figure I paid $122 on 555 gallons of diesel to drive 25,000 miles. It's a problem that will need to be solved. I am not against paying the tax as our roads really need help.
 

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Still less than I paid to the state last year. I figure I paid $122 on 555 gallons of diesel to drive 25,000 miles. It's a problem that will need to be solved. I am not against paying the tax as our roads really need help.
I agree. My problem is whether or not all of the tax money is devoted to paying for the upkeep of the infrastructure, or whether those monies are siphoned off for other pet projects.

Also, I agree with getting rid of the Oil Industry subsidies which is a give-away of our tax dollars at this point.
 

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If everyone just paid usage fee based on (mileage difference from previous year at registration) X (some weight factor), this would be fair. Not sure why it's not done this way.
 

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We contribute to road taxes all over this country. Completed the last of the "Lower-48" as of this summer - the majority of them in our 2013 Volt. Since our Volt can't swim, we'll have to book alternative transportation to see the last two.

Just paid road taxes (via gasoline taxes) for 115 gallons in 5 states over 17 days.

This is from the our 2017 vacation.
Trip B.JPG

Two other vacations in our Volt were 6K miles each. Headed to a funeral this weekend that'll put another ~650 gas-miles on her.
Trip A.JPG
 

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We contribute to road taxes all over this country. Completed the last of the "Lower-48" as of this summer - the majority of them in our 2013 Volt. Since our Volt can't swim, we'll have to book alternative transportation to see the last two.

Just paid road taxes (via gasoline taxes) for 115 gallons in 5 states over 17 days.

This is from the our 2017 vacation.
View attachment 137609

Two other vacations in our Volt were 6K miles each. Headed to a funeral this weekend that'll put another ~650 gas-miles on her.
View attachment 137617
You only need alternative transportation to get to Hawaii. You can drive to Alaska from the lower 48 via the Trans-Alaska highway.
 

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You only need alternative transportation to get to Hawaii. You can drive to Alaska from the lower 48 via the Trans-Alaska highway.
Or, you could ship the Volt to Hawaii, just to polish off the 50 states in the Volt (probably need to backtrack and cover some of the state's you've been to with another vehicle.) Go Norm51 Go!!!
 

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You only need alternative transportation to get to Hawaii. You can drive to Alaska from the lower 48 via the Trans-Alaska highway.
Yeah, I thought of that about 5 seconds after hitting the Submit button. I then thought about meeting a moose outside of protected spaces - like a zoo, and decided not to edit the post.

I've seen pictures of Alaska that are just as beautiful as these two from Flaming Gorge National Recreation Area that straddles Wyoming and Utah.

Flaming Gorge.jpg

Flaming Gorge2.jpg
 

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If everyone just paid usage fee based on (mileage difference from previous year at registration) X (some weight factor), this would be fair. Not sure why it's not done this way.
Because "fair" has nothing to do with taxation. Diesel is taxed at a higher rate than gas because big trucking companies use it.It is a way to tax big business without hitting the poor. It is also why there is off road diesel that is not taxed so small farms don't pay the road tax portion for the fuel. As long as there is class war, there will be nothing even remotely fair about taxation.
 

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Because "fair" has nothing to do with taxation. Diesel is taxed at a higher rate than gas because big trucking companies use it.It is a way to tax big business without hitting the poor. It is also why there is off road diesel that is not taxed so small farms don't pay the road tax portion for the fuel. As long as there is class war, there will be nothing even remotely fair about taxation.
But taxation could be fairer (more fair? More fairerer?). Implement a single flat percentage income tax collected by your employer with no tax brackets, no deductions, no tax credits, no loopholes or tax shelters for people to hide behind. Instead of the IRS pestering citizens with audits, they focus on monitoring the collection from employers. By definition the poor pay less and the rich pay more - all a percentage of what they make.
 

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But taxation could be fairer (more fair? More fairerer?). Implement a single flat percentage income tax collected by your employer with no tax brackets, no deductions, no tax credits, no loopholes or tax shelters for people to hide behind. Instead of the IRS pestering citizens with audits, they focus on monitoring the collection from employers. By definition the poor pay less and the rich pay more - all a percentage of what they make.
I ran the numbers for a flat 15% tax with the Federal Minimum Wage being the sole deduction. For most people from 30K to 100K the difference is less than $1,000 per year vs. what the current tax code with all it's add here/subtract here crap contains. Oh, and I didn't include investment or interest income when doing this, effectively making all savings similar to a Roth IRA.
 
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