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Outside of warranty, what is the cost to replace the BECM? Are failures limited to certain year Volts?
Someone else here is more of an authority to me, but the problems seem to center on 2017s. I'm pretty sure I've seen some 2016 and 2018, and a smattering of first gens.

As for cost, the part itself appears to be just a few hundred bucks but the labor, particularly the software part, probably means most of us would have to rely on the dealership and their rates. There's also the issue of having to drop the battery to access the BECM, which isn't trivial.
 

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This is not legal advice but I believe that the federal Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act (specifically, 15 U.S. Code § 2304) requires warranty repairs to be made within a "reasonable time."

My concern about this is what happens when the Gen 2 Volts are out of warranty? GM is only required to keep spare parts around to comply with its warranty obligations. BECMs may be unobtainable in a few years.
I haven't been able to find what constitutes 'reasonable time' in terms of Magnuson-Moss, and not for lack of trying.

The concern above is exactly my worry. GM does have two clear incentives to produce parts - 1) they can sell both the parts and the repair work involved, and 2) keep existing customers happy, leading to future & word of mouth sales. Of course, their calculus might involve the hubristic thought that early obsolescence of an existing means a new sale opportunity, as if we wouldn't just go immediately to another manufacturer when abandoned.

The BECM shortage does lead me to thinking incentive #2 isn't exactly GM's highest priority. Yes, supply chain shortage, etc. etc., but I'd bet the farm that following discussion happens daily at GM: "we could take our supply-chain-limited resources and focus on supporting our existing fleet, or we could those limited resources to produce new units for a sellers market with historic markups, thus guaranteeing immediate sales and future parts and service revenue, and use Covid as an excuse to maintain PR with our neglected existing customer". It's the decision I'd make if I was them, but the cost is that not all customers are going to accept months without their cars, Covid or not. My company, which produces industrial machinery that requires long term support (much like a car) chose to prioritize #2. We know good rapport with existing customers is much better for long term revenue than selling as many new units as possible regardless of our ability to support it. We're also not publicly traded and don't have shareholders clamoring for quarterly profits and sales numbers, which, in the end, is probably what GM is up against.

I've made this point in other threads, so apologies for the redundancy.
 
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