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So I live in Southern California and don't get my Volt exposed too much to any extreme cold weather, with the exception of driving regularly to Mammoth Mountain for snowboarding.

I am new to the Volt--not even had it a month, so referring to Chapter 5, Page 44 of my Owner's Manual (see except below), what happens when I'm up there and the temps are in the single digits and I need to drive it? What are my options?

I will probably be at a place with no way to charge my car and parked outside in the elements during the weekends that I'm there. I plan on being on gasoline during those trips.

BATTERY TOO COLD, PLUG IN
TO WARM


This message displays during
extremely cold temperatures, when
the vehicle will not start until the
high voltage battery is warm
enough.

Plug the vehicle in and make sure
the power button is off to allow the
charging system to warm the high
voltage battery, then the vehicle can
be started.
 

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Oops. It turns out the HV battery starts the ICE. If the electrolye of the HV battery freezes, the ICE can not start. Thus, If its too cold for the battery, and you can't plug in, I refer you to the experience of the Donner Party.

Another thread referenced a GM tech type who gave -15F for frozen electrlyte...no current.
 

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You'll be fine. They are referring to leaving your car for an extended cold soak. While driving in cold temps, the ICE will come on to keep the cabin warm. The battery thermal management system will also help keep the battery warm. The battery pack is also insulated.

But lets say you let your car sit outside in frigid weather for long enought for this message to popup. Simply plug in the car and it will warm the battery up.
 

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Call ahead about charging. Many places are very very accommodating about it since you are spending your money to be there. Since your car will be sitting most of the day and night, a 120 V plug should give you a full charge and help keep the batteries conditioned with even less gas used. And if not, the Volt is designed to protect the batteries and keep you going without any charging at all.
 

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I think that by "extremely cold temperatures", they mean -15°F (-26°C) or lower.
 

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I live in Central NY and have never seen that message, owning my Volt for 2 years now. I don't know of anyone that has ever seen that message, never noticed it on these forums anyway.

I think that's some very extreme case, possibly much colder than the -15 mentioned above. Maybe someone else knows the criteria.
 

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Don't most places like that have plugs for diesel pickup block heaters? Just remember to bring your evse for 110/120 volt service.
 

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With all the members on this thread (some even in Alaska) a quick search does not turn up that anyone has ever seen this message in real life yet. Anybody know a thread? We had a warm winter...
 

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One also has to remember where Detroit is. Having "lived" there for the past 100+ years, GM probably knows a thing or two about cold and how to test/certify motor vehicles in harsh conditions! LOL

The OP should be more worried if he was taking a regular ICE vehicle with an older 12V battery that's needed to crank a frozen engine.
 

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One also has to remember where Detroit is. Having "lived" there for the past 100+ years, GM probably knows a thing or two about cold and how to test/certify motor vehicles in harsh conditions! LOL

The OP should be more worried if he was taking a regular ICE vehicle with an older 12V battery that's needed to crank a frozen engine.
Was wondering when this would be said! Laughed until tears were in my eyes :) Folks will actually question the cold weather capabilities of a 100 year old company whose very first inklings of even a daydream of any vehicle, will occur in the winters of northern Michigan. Wow, and I thought I was a tough critic.
 
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