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Discussion Starter #1
Where can I find more "official" battery specs with regarding to how much power it can draw at once e.g. 3.3 kw? I see people talking about it in various threads but I don't see it in the manual or on any websites. Can someone drop a link? thanks!
 

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just to be clear you want charging numbers and not power/energy the car will take from the battery ?
 

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At WOT, It seems to max out at 120kw. It is pretty easy to see over 100kw when merging into fast highway traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
just to be clear you want charging numbers and not power/energy the car will take from the battery ?
yes; my electrician believed that the volt battery could take 30 amps while charging but I thought it was only 15. Thus, the search for an official answer but all I can find are posts from other people, no "official" GM documentation.
 

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Page 9-56 of my 2013 Owner's Manual has this:


The following are the minimum
requirements for circuits used to
charge this vehicle:
. 120V/15Amp
. 240V/20Amp
Charging equipment with a rating of
at least 240V/20Amp will provide
the fastest charging time to
recharge the high voltage battery.
240V/40Amp circuits provide
flexibility for future vehicle charging
needs. Always follow your charging
equipment installation instructions.
Contact your dealer for more
information.
------
I assume a similar section exists in the 2016 manual. IIRC, gen2 has a 3.6kW onboard charger (vs 3.3 for gen1). 3600W / 240V = 15 A, with 80% de-rating for sustained load you'd want at least 20A capability (depending on which L2 EVSE you choose, of course).
 

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The manual for the EVSE you select will specify the required breaker size.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Page 9-56 of my 2013 Owner's Manual has this:


The following are the minimum
requirements for circuits used to
charge this vehicle:
. 120V/15Amp
. 240V/20Amp
Charging equipment with a rating of
at least 240V/20Amp will provide
the fastest charging time to
recharge the high voltage battery.
240V/40Amp circuits provide
flexibility for future vehicle charging
needs. Always follow your charging
equipment installation instructions.
Contact your dealer for more
information.
------
I assume a similar section exists in the 2016 manual. IIRC, gen2 has a 3.6kW onboard charger (vs 3.3 for gen1). 3600W / 240V = 15 A, with 80% de-rating for sustained load you'd want at least 20A capability (depending on which L2 EVSE you choose, of course).
yes, this is exactly what I'm looking for, except I don't see it in the 2016 manual. I'm particularly interested in the 3.6kw onboard charger spec...more so I can show my electrician "look, this is the official spec"
 

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Your electrician is probably just being conservative. Heavy wiring and breaker than absolutely necessary. Gives you some room for higher draw if next car can charge faster. The Volt simply can't draw 30 amps. Can't even draw 20.
 

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yes, this is exactly what I'm looking for, except I don't see it in the 2016 manual. I'm particularly interested in the 3.6kw onboard charger spec...more so I can show my electrician "look, this is the official spec"
Are you speccing for only this car or do you want to leave room for the potential that Gen 3 might have a 6.6kW onboard charger? The cost difference between wires to carry 20 amps vs 30 amps isn't NEARLY as pricey as the cost of pulling out the 20 amp wire and putting in 30 later.
 

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yes, this is exactly what I'm looking for, except I don't see it in the 2016 manual. I'm particularly interested in the 3.6kw onboard charger spec...more so I can show my electrician "look, this is the official spec"
As mentioned upthread, it can draw 15 amps at 240v. (3600/240=15) Per the NEC, a continuous load must not be more than 80% of a circuits rating. So a minimum of a 20 amp circuit (80% of 20 is 16) would be appropriate for charging at full speed.

Your electrician is probably used to installing 30 amp circuits for clothes dryers. The difference in materials cost between a 20 amp circuit and a 30 amp circuit is pennies per foot. So it is good future proofing to go with a higher power circuit.
 

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If you plan on future EVs you might want to go 8 or 6 gauge wire (32 amp continuous or 44 amp continuous, I believe), most of the expense will probably be labor unless you have a long run. I went with 8 gauge, which will allow up to around 20 or 25 miles per hour charge rate on a possible future EV (Volt is still limited to about 10 miles per hour charge rate). When I say miles per hour charge, that is approximate and for good weather. Regardless of EV, I won't personally need more than 20 or 25 miles per hour charging at my house.
 

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yes, this is exactly what I'm looking for, except I don't see it in the 2016 manual. I'm particularly interested in the 3.6kw onboard charger spec...more so I can show my electrician "look, this is the official spec"
From page 14 of the 2016 Volt "Get to know your vehicle" document at http://www.chevrolet.com/owners/chevy-manuals.html

"Home Charging Station
Charging equipment with a rating of at least 240Volt/20Amp will provide the fastest charging time to recharge the propulsion battery."

And, as others have said, consider making it a 30-40 amp circuit to have enough capacity for your next EV.
 
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