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Watched a YouTube video of a guy that something like 40,000 something miles on a Leaf . He pointed out that the instrument display had a " battery health " indicator with " bars " . Kind of like the display of signal strength on a cell phone .

His indicator was down 3 bars meaning the battery was down enough to noticeable reduce his range , in miles .

Now , to my question pertaining to the Spark EV . Does it have a display to indicate pretty much the same thing ? If so , what are you all seeing on your cars ? How much loss in range ?

Thanks , :)
Wyr
God bless
 

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Early leafs in really hot climates had issues where battery packs were replaced under warranty, but they apparently changed the design to help avoid this problem in current leafs. I've never seen a report in 3 years of reading this forum about battery range loss in a spark, but then again sparks were sold in so few states that there aren't very many Spark EVs out there.

A coworker of mine working in AZ got his car lemon lawed because Nissan was unwilling to replace his battery nor deal with the plastic out gassing from the seats made of recycled pop bottles.
 

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No other EV (or Plug-in) has a battery health meter, that I'm aware of. I've never understood why Nissan would want their customer to know this information. I'm sure it affects the resale of used Leaf's (Leaves). The Chevrolet products, Volt and Spark, both use a thermal management system for the battery, which the Nissan lacks. Almost every other plug-in uses some form of Thermal management which works to cool the battery when it gets too warm, or to warm the battery when it gets too cool.

There is more anecdotal evidence on the Volt than the Spark, but look at the case of Eric Belmer who has over 300,000 miles on his Chevy Volt with no signs of any battery loss. It appears that Thermal management plays a large part in this.

To me, The Nissan is a nice package, it may look a little quirky but I like the tall seating position, the interior room, the dash lay-out and the utility, but I would not buy one, because it lacks a thermal management system.
 

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Heat is the enemy of battery longevity. This is why Chevy EV's (Volt, Spark, ELR, Bolt) all have a liquid cooling system as mentioned above. Nissan tried to take a shortcut by not having a liquid cooling system and claimed the Volt's design was over-engineered. Nissan owners paid the price in "wilted" Leafs, while the Chevy EV's are still going strong.
 

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I wouldn't buy ANY EV that didn't have a liquid TMS like the Volt etc. The Volt is so well engineered and over protected (huge buffer and TMS) that I doubt we'll notice any real loss of range for at least a decade maybe more.

Good luck.
 

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No other EV (or Plug-in) has a battery health meter, that I'm aware of. I've never understood why Nissan would want their customer to know this information. I'm sure it affects the resale of used Leaf's (Leaves). The Chevrolet products, Volt and Spark, both use a thermal management system for the battery, which the Nissan lacks. Almost every other plug-in uses some form of Thermal management which works to cool the battery when it gets too warm, or to warm the battery when it gets too cool.

There is more anecdotal evidence on the Volt than the Spark, but look at the case of Eric Belmer who has over 300,000 miles on his Chevy Volt with no signs of any battery loss. It appears that Thermal management plays a large part in this.

To me, The Nissan is a nice package, it may look a little quirky but I like the tall seating position, the interior room, the dash lay-out and the utility, but I would not buy one, because it lacks a thermal management system.
I have a 2011 LEAF and it did not even display the SOC. After our meeting with the Chief Vehicle Engineer for the LEAF in 2011, Nissan moved in the direction of displaying the SOC. However, info on the battery capacity is another matter, they didn't show any data for the driver. That info is available with ELM3277 dongle connected to the OBDII. The initial battery capacity is about 66 Ahr. Currently my LEAF is showing about 51 Ahr and the loss of 2 out of 12 capacity bars [shown on the display]. If an early LEAF owner loses 4 of the bars in less than 5 yrs and 60K miles, the warranty gave a new battery. The lack of active cooling of the battery is a big problem, and wonder how much longer Nissan can built EVs without addressing the thermal issue. As batteries become larger and the DCFC operates at higher currents, it seems to me, active cooling is a necessity.
 

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Really hot climates? I lost 3 bars and the average high in July where I am is 72F.
Do you still have the LEAF? If so, how many bars have you lost now? There are several 2011 LEAF owners nearby who have lost 4 bars and received new batteries. I wonder if the LEAF had active thermal management, how well the batteries would hold up. Of course, the EV weight would be higher and so would the cost, I think.
 

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I have a 2012 Nissan leaf with 50,000km (31,000miles) on it. It has still not lost its first capacitance bar. But it is noticeable that the first (fuel) bar only gets about 8km, where the rest of the battery/fuel bars (on average) get about 12km. I expect to lose the first capacitance bar by the end of the year. (Which ain't bad, considering 4 years of solid use, charging to full almost every night...) I believe if you lose more than 3 of them before 160,000km or 6 years, Nissan will replace the batter. I do not expect that to happen with my vehicle.
 
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