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I received my Volt April 19th and it has been in for service twice, both times I've been without my brand new car for 4 days or longer. First time the dealer said the originating dealer had over filled the gas tank resulting in the venting system being filled with gas. How a "venting tube" gets filled is beyond me as most venting mechanics has to do with allowing liquid or air through and shouldn't "store" or collect anything.

Took five days and the part had to be ordered from Lansing Michigan which meant a longer wait. Picked up the car and within a couple of days the engine light was back on again.

This time I took in the car on Tuesday and it is now Friday late afternoon and the dealer says they couldn't get it done and won't have it for the weekend. They are replacing the entire assembly and associated parts of the evaporation system.

I've talked to Volt Advisors and the basic response is "it is new technology" which is lame. I am a technologist and understand the issues, but I don't understand why the parts can't be installed dring an entire day. Or why Volt dealers can't have some parts in stock that might relate to a variety of engine light issues that are not exactly rare.

The primary thing is my Volt experience has gone to being really excited about a brand new car, the first American car I've bought in decades, to souring because I'm paying for a car that I can't use and that can't be fixed in a reasonable amount of time. I've gone from a buy recommendation to a don't buy recommendation. Cognitive dissonance is not working ;-).

I am reluctant to hold the dealership responsible, but they are the customer-facing humans associated with the bad experience.

$46k+ car and I don't have it... Prorated the cost of it being in the shop and my lost time around it is hundreds of dollars. How about sending out a full set of all Volt accessories to people who have service problems with a brand new car... This is the point where there is a disconnect between customer experience, and customer service. It shouldn't cost me this much on top of the actual price paid to drive a new car. Is this a lemon?
 

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Sorry that you're having these issues. Has to be very frustrating.

We've seen the overfilled gas tank before but not the replacement of the evaporation system. Are these related problems? Seems like the gas tank have been really overfilled.
 

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Sorry to hear about your problem, this is the first report of this problem that I have read.

They should have given you a loaner car, unfoturnatly most dealers are not giving Volts as loaners.

Not many dealers are stocking Volt parts yet and sense it is taking time for Volt repairs everyware as the techs do not have a lot of experience with them yet and it takes a couple of days to get parts. Mine has been in the dealership a few times, once for a intermittent instrument cluster, once after I was rear ended, and once for the updates, each took 3 to 5 days.

Im sure you will find it is worth the wait when you are driving it again.

Even though I had a loaner car each time, I still realy missed my Volt.
 

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I am sorry that you are getting poor service. Who is your dealer?
 

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Sorry to hear about your experience. It sounds like the problem you are having could happen on any (gasoline) car and is not a system unique to the Volt. Every car has an evaporative emissions system, required to meet regulations. When the tank is badly overfilled, there is not room for the gas to expand, so the liquid goes into the areas reserved for vapor; areas that have activated charcoal to trap the vapors, which are ruined if gasoline gets in there. The Volt gas tank is pressurized and sealed so the gas doesn't go stale if not used for a while, so it may be somewhat more sensitive to overfilling. If it's something your dealer did incorrectly (I know someone who ordered a new diesel track and it was filled with gasoline instead of diesel fuel at the dealer, causing many problems on a new vehicle), I would go after the dealer for damages, including your lost time and a loaner. Don't blame it on the Volt though; it could happen to any car.

As an aside, I often see people filling at the gas station, clicking and clicking until the fuel finally ends up on the ground and over the side of the car. This should be a warning for people not to do this with their Volts. The extra fuel one might put in is not needed, and will probably be carried around unnecessarily for weeks as they drive gas-free.
 

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I received my Volt April 19th and it has been in for service twice, both times I've been without my brand new car for 4 days or longer. First time the dealer said the originating dealer had over filled the gas tank resulting in the venting system being filled with gas. How a "venting tube" gets filled is beyond me as most venting mechanics has to do with allowing liquid or air through and shouldn't "store" or collect anything.

Took five days and the part had to be ordered from Lansing Michigan which meant a longer wait. Picked up the car and within a couple of days the engine light was back on again.

This time I took in the car on Tuesday and it is now Friday late afternoon and the dealer says they couldn't get it done and won't have it for the weekend. They are replacing the entire assembly and associated parts of the evaporation system.

I've talked to Volt Advisors and the basic response is "it is new technology" which is lame. I am a technologist and understand the issues, but I don't understand why the parts can't be installed dring an entire day. Or why Volt dealers can't have some parts in stock that might relate to a variety of engine light issues that are not exactly rare.

The primary thing is my Volt experience has gone to being really excited about a brand new car, the first American car I've bought in decades, to souring because I'm paying for a car that I can't use and that can't be fixed in a reasonable amount of time. I've gone from a buy recommendation to a don't buy recommendation. Cognitive dissonance is not working ;-).

I am reluctant to hold the dealership responsible, but they are the customer-facing humans associated with the bad experience.

$46k+ car and I don't have it... Prorated the cost of it being in the shop and my lost time around it is hundreds of dollars. How about sending out a full set of all Volt accessories to people who have service problems with a brand new car... This is the point where there is a disconnect between customer experience, and customer service. It shouldn't cost me this much on top of the actual price paid to drive a new car. Is this a lemon?
We all feel your pain, it could have happened to any one of us...sorry to hear about your difficulties, I hope it works out for you, keep us posted
 

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When I got my Volt and when the battery upgrade were done I had instructions to NOT add any gas to the car.
This was from seeing posts on this forum.

Does sound like a DO NOT OVER FILL sticker inside the gas flap might be a good idea.
 

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Don't you find it ironic that you seem to be dissatisfied with basically an electric vehicle because the gasoline fuel system is a problem? If you can get beyond someone over filling the gas tank you will probably find happiness. I almost never put more than $20 worth of fuel in my Volt and I don't care how many gallons that might represent.

VIN # B0985
 

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It's a pressurized tank, so an open evaporation tube seems not to be correct. Maybe it has a one-way valve into the evaporation system with a pressure-relief valve?

Also (dealer techs, soccer moms and others trying to top-off) - don't be a "mad clicker". The over-fillers who click away at the pump trying to add ounces to top-off their tank. It's an unreasonable and also non-rational thing to do. Unless you drive to the point of zero-ounces remaining in your tank, it makes no sense to fill past the first auto-shutoff point of the nozzle. And, actually, a Volt owner can indeed drive past zero-ounces and still travel on for a few miles on battery-reserve available. I use a "one and done" mode of filling-up. One click and put the nozzle away on the pump - never ran out of gas doing that.
 

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I received my Volt April 19th and it has been in for service twice, both times I've been without my brand new car for 4 days or longer. First time the dealer said the originating dealer had over filled the gas tank resulting in the venting system being filled with gas. How a "venting tube" gets filled is beyond me as most venting mechanics has to do with allowing liquid or air through and shouldn't "store" or collect anything.

Is this a lemon?
Nope yourcar is NOT A LEMON... the exsact thing hppened to be when i got my car it waited till three days out to pop the CEL but it did and i contacted the dealership and they told me i could drive it and they would order the parts. They ended up replacng the whole system and they warned me not to over fill the tank.. i told them " I would if i had the chance to put gas in it"" anyways mine is back and it's fine as ever it was a bump in the road but it's smooth sailing now...... mostly on electrons
 

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In 11K miles I have had the service engine light on at least a half dozen times. when checking online it would say no service needed so I just ignore it and if I were driving around town electric the light would go out. Then on the way home after engine start it would come on again. I am one of those guy's that overfills the tank trying to match what the gauge said was used, usually ending with a tenth of a gallon on my foot. We drive very dirty roads and I though that might be the problem, I was going to schedule a dealer service but when I had time but now I know overfilling could do it I will wait till I run a couple of tanks of gas.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I appreciate everyone's response and comments. Yes, frustrating. Worse I'm basically out several hundreds of dollars in the time I am paying for the car without its use, or the use of a comparable car. You should have seen the Impala the dealership rented for me the first time - hard to believe it is made by the same company as the Volt. Second time I had them give me a ride home and drove my son's car, with a $40+ gas fill up. I had only used 3 gallons in the Volt during the first two months and 2,500+ miles so going back to paying for gas is not easy.

It is now 1 week and one day ;-). This afternoon I got word that the car was allegedly ready, but there was too much traffic to send a courtesy car to where my work is, and by the time I could get back to my home their drivers would have left for the day. So I'm waiting to hear when they an pick me up tomorrow morning.

With the purchase and service on the Volt I'm struck by how weird car dealerships can be in terms of customer experience, and moving up the food chain customer experience of the manufacturer (Chevy/GM) which is also bizarre.

For me saying this could happen to any type of car is missing the point. I would also look to the manufacturer of any 45K+ car to address it being unusable for nearly two weeks of it's short life. The better the car the more frustrating its loss of functionality. I've paid or am paying easily $100 per week before gas savings for an expensive car and I don't have the use of that car its a customer experience problem for the company that makes it. Volt advisers to beat up the dealers who don't have parts is not the answer, nor is the Volt adviser calling the service managers. What I would like from a Volt Adviser is to be an advocate with teh car company, not the dealers. Front the dealers the right parts if they're too cheap to order them. Help improve the customer experience or user experience (UX) PROACTIVELY.

The comments about over-filling a gas tank are ironic on an electric car. Although I think a more fitting word is "absurd" or "idiotic" which are engineering terms for designing a gas tank and/or venting system that is capable of this level of damage through something that people do occasionally. I should point out that I've personally never put any gas in my Volt. Granted I've only had it for two months. Any over-filling was at the dealership where they must have put gas in it before handing it over to me. So the absurdity increases because the staff of the dealership allegedly caused the problem in the second production year of the car...?

The fact that Volt engineers may have poorly designed the gas tank and opening worries me quite a bit.

I want electric cars to succeed, I want my all of our experiences to be good, including the manufacturer/General Motors so they will make more and less expensive versions of the car.

Right now when people ask me about the Volt experience I simply tell them the truth: reliability is currently a problem. I can not say that the dealer, Chevy, or General Motors have done anything to make the experience any more palatable. Mostly the response continues to be "Hey Jake, it's Electricville..." or some version of cognitive dissonance about how great it will be when my new car is repaired. I get it... and I hope that is right but if you see more engine light posts and problems you know it is something that should be fixed in a proactive, preventative manner, not though letting us deal with it in an ad hoc manner.

Are there regional areas in these forums?
 

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The comments about over-filling a gas tank are ironic on an electric car. Although I think a more fitting word is "absurd" or "idiotic" which are engineering terms for designing a gas tank and/or venting system that is capable of this level of damage through something that people do occasionally.
Well people will have to get used to it. If you want to blame someone blame California (CARB) and the EPA. The Volt is one of the first GM cars to employ a new requirement in Onboard Refueling Vapor Recovery (OBVR) which has additional components in the filler neck designed to reguritate fuel vapors as you refuel, preventing hydro-carbons from escaping into the atmoshpere. A great many other cars (not just GM) will take issue to over-filing as well.

Back to your issue...
Has the dealership ever indicated which code was set? a DTC P0497 possibly?
If so, (and assuming the tank actually WAS over-filled) it sounds like they probably didnt blow out all of the excess fuel from some of the evaporative emissions control lines on the first repair.
Additionally, this evap system is a bit more difficult to verify a repair as it takes daily dirunal temperature swings (and appropriate coressponding tank pressure changes) to drive the diagnostic.

Hopefully they have it now.
WOT
 

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I think there is a good point in this story. If someone brings in a Volt for an extended stay for a WARRANTY repair, they should get a Volt loaner, period. One day I'm fine with another car, or maybe two, but the story above is a problem. Many of us bought Volts and figured in the premium price vs. gas savings.

And the dealer saying traffic is too bad for the courtesy car, give me a break. They've just decided they don't want to pay someone to go and pick you up. How much could they pay the drivers? $20-30 isn't worth this. Penny-wise, Pound-foolish. I bet it's not worth the ill will the Dealer is building up. It wouldn't be for me. And I would show it to them by not recommending their dealer, or buying other cars there and telling them why.

The most frustrating thing is when someone messes up the fix to the first mess up. That's the extra ill will builder I see here.

Hopefully they will get it worked out. But I would consider looking for another Dealer if one is available.
 

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Calling in with my new White Diamond Chevy Volt here in Parker CO. Car is in the repair shop tonight, 2nd trip for a repair (same repair) in 7 days. And yes, I too am feeling lonely without the car. What a fantastic feeling to drive a Volt. Hope it comes back soon. This car will go to my little blue eyed blonde angel when she starts college in a few years. I hope to own a Tesla and one more Volt over the next 5 years. Electric is the way to go. Charged magazine mentioned cars are getting a new standard allowing them to charge in 15 minutes. The future is coming and the Volt, Leaf, Ford, and Tesla models are leading the way. Dear Middle East nutjobs, stick your hand in that oil. No more young men and women for your death addiction.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Hang in there I can testify that Volts come back from the repair shops... but going in for the same repair is an issue!

I'll report on the code when I get it. No paperwork - it will be mailed, or your code is in the mail...? ;-)

The good news: I got the car back the next day, after the courtesy driver went to the wrong address (despite sending the correct one multiple times...) and they had to send another driver to get me (less than five miles from the dealership). The engine light has stayed off.

Disappointing news: Volt advisers communication. Bad customer experience. Without a car for two weeks during first two months of owning a $45k+ car and the issue is engineering and training of dealer mechanics. Engineering an electric car that has a gas tank that can be overfilled to the point of causing physical damage to a complete subsystem is a manufacturing defect -- either systemic or on an individual car. In either case the customer should be treated as if the manufacturer would like to keep that customer and get referrals in the future. To me this means a token of recognition like an offer of some complementary service, accessories, SOMETHING that says, "Hey, we get it we screwed up and we owe you a little acknowledgement for sticking with us while we figure out how we screwed this up." It costs less than the ill-will created online and via word-of-mouth. This doesn't have anything to do with Volt being a good, bad, or unknown value -- its just a cheap customer experience approach. If it turns one more person towards the purchase of a Volt, it's a win:win for everyone. Ignore a bad customer experience, even after it has been fixed, and it's really dumb. Sort of like slinking away from an accident.

Other good news: I discovered the premium parking and charging stations at the Whole Foods headquarters store in Austin. 240 that works with the $25 Austin Energy key ring tag. Sweet. Shop, sit and sip your coffee, use the wireless and charge the car. First time I went a "greedy" Leaf hogged the (single!) charging station ;-). This is a GOOD customer experience, but I associate it with Whole Foods, not General Motors or Chevrolet...
 

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StrategicVolt, which dealer did you use in Austin? I'm in the same area of Central Texas, so I was just wondering which dealer gave you poor service.
 

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The comments about over-filling a gas tank are ironic on an electric car. Although I think a more fitting word is "absurd" or "idiotic" which are engineering terms for designing a gas tank and/or venting system that is capable of this level of damage through something that people do occasionally. I should point out that I've personally never put any gas in my Volt. Granted I've only had it for two months. Any over-filling was at the dealership where they must have put gas in it before handing it over to me. So the absurdity increases because the staff of the dealership allegedly caused the problem in the second production year of the car...?
Sounds about right for a dealer that may have trouble selling such an amazing piece of technology, and apparently opts to transfer them to other dealers instead.
 
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