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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Average shopper paid $32,382 for a car in May, equal to effective Volt price of $32.5k. So despite contrary claims, the Volt is NOT "too expensive".

http://content.usatoday.com/communi...ling-vehicles-toyota-ram-score/1#.T8ppP784rcY

I know many reviewers love to drag out the "Volt price compared to an econocar price" to support a trumped up claim that the Volt will take years to pay the difference in price. However, when the average new car buyer is already paying what a Volt costs (after tax credit), the econocar comparison is shown to be inapplicable to the average car buyer.

The average car buyer could buy a Volt for what they are already paying and get $1500-$2000/year in gas savings the Volt delivers. The payback for the average car buyer is instant, not 10 years, not 5 years. I don't expect car reviewers to understand this of course. It doesn't fit their agenda and bias.

chevroletvoltsavings.jpg
 

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Very good point, Steverino.

The July 2012 issue of Car and Driver has a review of the Volkswagen Golf R hatchback. Price as tested: $36,260.00. EPA City MPG: 19. EPA Highway MPG: 27.

VW has limited availability in the U.S. to 5,000 units.
 

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Yeah, I wrote the same thing several months ago:
http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread...ensive-based-on-what-folks-are-buying-already
I ended up putting the boob who personally attacked me (as a result of me stating just what you did) on my ignore list. I'll be interested to see if he pops his head up here. Ultimate irony- he states that he and another fellow will sell lots more Volts than me because I don't relate to normal people...only that other guy later traded in his Volt ...for a Jag.

I still agree with the sentiment completely- if you are buying an average new car, than you can NEVER complain that the Volt is too expensive. Other than its seating capacity (for some, that is), there is nothing NOT to like about the Volt...and for a car that rarely needs gas, it is really MUCH CHEAPER than the average new car.
 

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I know many reviewers love to drag out the "Volt price compared to an econocar price" to support a trumped up claim that the Volt will take years to pay the difference in price. However, when the average new car buyer is already paying what a Volt costs (after tax credit), the econocar comparison is shown to be inapplicable to the average car buyer.
I've been saying this for years. Here's the conclusion that I've come to. People think that the only reason to buy a Volt, Leaf, Prius, or other hybrid is either to be green or because you want to save money. So, having never driven one of the vehicles themselves, they assume that these vehicles are essentially econobox cars that happen to be very expensive due to their technology. People often assume that everyone would much rather be driving a Hummer, Tahoe, Caddilac Escalade, or some giant dually pickup truck. They figure that people give up driving what they really want (the gas guzzler) and instead drive the hybrid or EV because they care about some greater cause (such as the environment) and are willing to sacrifice and drive a horrible car.

OK.. Nobody actually ever says this. But this is the reality of what people are thinking. In fact, it is such a major assumption in peoples' minds that is why it is never actually talked about. It is just assumed to be true.

Most people never actually stop to consider that people actually like these kinds of cars because they actually think they are cool. And there is the problem. People assume that you are spending extra money to be green, or spending extra money to "save money" and hence if you only cared about saving money you should have a Nissan Versa or a used Civic or something.

That is the source of their misunderstanding on the price.
 

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Completely agree. If you need more seats, then buy two, like we just did from Stingray Chevrolet, Charles Olsen in Florida. You cannot beat the deal he will give you!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I'd sure like an auto writer to put the proposition this way, "Your going to pay $32.5K for a car today. Do you want one with the $2k per year in gas savings or without?"

I think the stereotyping issue has some real merit. I suspect many don't understand the Volt is a lot more like a BMW 3 series than like a Cruze. I suspect many think it is an underpowered hybrid, rather than a car with 273 lb-ft or instant torque. I suspect many think it is bought by "greenies", when many are bought by people who want to address a national energy security issue. And of course there is the politics of party first, America second talking heads that dump on the Volt whenever possible.

Nonetheless, the average car buyer is paying the equivalent of a Volt for a new car. They just aren't able to enjoying the benefits of owning the actual car!
 

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Macroeconomics over microeconomics

We often talk about how expensive it is to shift away from foreign oil. But anyone who cares, do the math $400 billion annually in American dollars going to Middle East oil barons and another $430 billion per year spent protecting the oil lanes for our trading partners who turn around and kick the canola out of us on trade prices. We could literally buy every American in the market each year a Volt and still be ahead of the game.

Chevy Volt, American-made, American -F.U-E.L.E.D. Keeping the jobs here, one electric car at a time.
 

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Chevy Volt, American-made, American -F.U-E.L.E.D. Keeping the jobs here, one electric car at a time.
Since many of the detractors can't understand the real economics of Volt ownership, maybe they can comprehend jbfalaska's simple yet accurate statement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Speaking of Volt detractors: Audi USA president Johan De Nysschen gained infamy late last year for remarking that the plug-in electric hybrid 2011 Chevrolet Volt is a "car for idiots."
All is well that ends well. HA!
"Audi is launching its first electric car, the A3 e-tron, on a trial basis in four markets across the country." The etron will be a hatchback (like a Volt), have a top speed of 90 MPH (less than the 100 MPH Volt), 0-62 in 11.2 seconds (Volt, 0-60 in 8.5 seconds) and a range limited to just 90 miles (Volt, no range limit).

Hmm this fully electric Audi seems like something less compelling than a Volt and likely more expense. What idiot would buy one?
 

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Don't forget the lipstick....

Another point that I would like to add is that other cars seems to have a high markup on the MSRP price while the Volt does not. I believe GM tried to get it as low as possible, but when someone goes to a dealership and get a new car with "$3,000-10,000" off of MSRP, they think they are getting a great deal when they can barely get $500 off a Volt's MSRP. When in fact, it is just lipstick on a pig.

For me, the shopping aspect for my Volt was poor at my local dealership. It was dull, the price is bascially what it, the sales guy didn't want to play around (because it was not in their $$$ interest to do so). Luckily Stingray came through. However, after my purchase and had some time for ownership, I would dare to say that I would now probably be happily paid my local dealership price to Stingray. After all, wait 1 year, and I get save at least $1000.--quicker I start, quicker the savings come in.

-KyleH
 

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Price even lower when factoring 0% interest for 72 months

Many people overlook the total cost. 0% for 72 months saved me $6800 on my Volt. Somehting other cars don't always provide, or a credit union/bank.
 
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