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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I ran across this article earlier this week, and it got me to thinking. Are we, as Volt owners possibly susceptible to antics like this? I know this is in the UK, but radio is radio.

It appears one guy walks around the house with his iPad searching for the key fob signal. Once he locks onto it, it sends the codes to the second person standing next to the Model S, and unlocks the doors, and allows him to start the car. I guess the only redeeming value, is that it takes them a while to figure out how to remove the charging cord. That accomplished, they are gone, and were able to turn off remote tracking, so the vehicle had become a ghost. Neither the owner, nor Tesla could locate the vehicle.

I can only assume that OnStar is much more complicated to defeat than simple commands entered on the tablet or phone, but this sure has got me wondering, and trying to find a decent Faraday bag to put the remotes in at night.


https://www.theverge.com/2018/10/22/18008514/tesla-model-s-stolen-key-fob-hack-watch-video

Any suggestions or comments are appreciated.
 

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I've read that this is a common problem with key fobs. The encryption is really poor.
 

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I can only assume that OnStar is much more complicated to defeat than simple commands entered on the tablet or phone, but this sure has got me wondering, and trying to find a decent Faraday bag to put the remotes in at night.
All you need is a small metal box, like an Altoids tin, which will provide all the shielding you need.
 

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Now that onstar wants your REAL email address all (they) need now is a password to unlock so make it a long password.
They still have to find your car.

Is your FOB doing strange things at NIGHT ? (If in range all night near the car - possible )

Making the radio signal weaker with some shielding ( You having to be closer to car to make it work ) could be helpfull.

Spray paint all key black to make taking pictures of the key pattern harder :)
 

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The vendor of those keyfobs was using weak 40 bit encryption long after the rest of the world had gone to 128 and longer bit encryption. This is yet another failure of IoT (Internet of Things).
 

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My understanding is that all cars are susceptible, to the same hack.
I ran across this article earlier this week, and it got me to thinking. Are we, as Volt owners possibly susceptible to antics like this? I know this is in the UK, but radio is radio.

It appears one guy walks around the house with his iPad searching for the key fob signal. Once he locks onto it, it sends the codes to the second person standing next to the Model S, and unlocks the doors, and allows him to start the car. I guess the only redeeming value, is that it takes them a while to figure out how to remove the charging cord. That accomplished, they are gone, and were able to turn off remote tracking, so the vehicle had become a ghost. Neither the owner, nor Tesla could locate the vehicle.

I can only assume that OnStar is much more complicated to defeat than simple commands entered on the tablet or phone, but this sure has got me wondering, and trying to find a decent Faraday bag to put the remotes in at night.


https://www.theverge.com/2018/10/22/18008514/tesla-model-s-stolen-key-fob-hack-watch-video

Any suggestions or comments are appreciated.
 

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So, in a word............YES.
 
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