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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

Is there any Volt owner who is living at Apartment ?
I'm considering purchasing Volt because I love this vehicle powered by electric motor.
But I'm living at Apartment, and there is no outlet in parking lot.
So if I have a Volt, I have to drive it with just gasoline only.

I think this might be really silly situation.
Using electric car without electric.

At least if it is possible that charging Volt by gas in the night without driver, I think it would be fine.
Is this possible?

I need Volt owner's experience and advice.

Thanks
 

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The Volt isn't designed to charge the battery completely on gas. I think you'll be disappointed if that's what you expect to do. If you don't have an opportunity to plug in, a plug-in car is probably not a good choice.
 

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I'd look at the Malibu Hybrid it has a Voltec drivetrain without the Volt's big battery, it's bigger than a Volt, you can get power seats (not available in the Volt), and it gets better gas mileage. The whole point of driving a Volt is that it runs on electricity much of the time, on electricity it's silent and it's acceleration is good, on it's ICE it's noisier and not as peppy. If you can't charge the Volt then all you are doing is paying for a 400lb 18.4KVh battery that you will never use, better to have the tiny 1.5KWh battery in the Malibu.
 

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There are Volt owners who rarely if ever charge their Volt, run mostly on gas. You can't fully charge a Volt using the internal gas engine. You can build up a 20% battery reserve using mountain mode (Gen II Volt) or 40% (Gen I Volt) but mountain mode is specifically intended for building up a reserve in advance of ascending mountain roads.

The Volt was designed to charge at home using Level I or Level II charging. The Volt does not offer DC Fast Charging. Some Volt owners do not have a place to charge at home but they can charge at work so that is one possibility if you have a way of charging at your workplace. If you charge using a 110V outlet (Level I charging) it will take between 14 and 19 hours for a full charge depending on whether you charge at the default 8 amp setting (19 hours) or can charge at 12 amps (14 hours). Level II charging is quicker, 4.5 hours for 240V/16 amp charging. Commercial public charging stations are usually 208V/16 amp so charging will take a bit longer. If you can find a free Level II charging location that would be ideal but you would need 5.5 hours for a full charge using 208V/16 amps.


Until the DC Fast charging infrastructure is more fully implemented apartment dwellers will not be able to take part in the EV revolution. Car sharing ventures such as Maven are currently offering Volt and Bolt vehicles in CA. Depending on where you live you may be able to sign up with Maven.

You may want to look into the local DC Fast charging options close to where you live or work. While the Volt does not support DC Fast Charging the Chevy Bolt EV (a different vehicle) does offer combined charging system (CCS) fast charging port as an option in addition to Level I and Level II charging (Level II at up to 240V/32 amps for 25 miles of EV range per hour.) The Bolt has an estimated EV range of 238 miles and optionally supports DC Fast Charging/CCS at up to 80kw for 90 miles of range in about 30 minutes of charging however most DC Fast Charging stations are currently limited to 50kw so it would take longer than 30 minutes of charging for 90 additional miles of range. Depending on how many miles you drive daily/weekly you might only need to a top off charge of a Chevy Bolt via CCS for half an hour to an hour, once or twice a week.
 

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The car will work fine using only gas to power it, but if that is your intended use, you can probably get a comparable hybrid that will get better MPG, or an ICE car that will cost less. If you happen to work somewhere with charging, it can still be a good choice, but this car really needs regular charging to be your best option. Unless you are trying to get HOV access.
 

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From what you have said, a Volt will not be a good choice for you. I don't think you'd be happy with the mpgs. Get yoursef a non- plug in hybrid, you'll be much happier.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Oh... my... god..
I was underestimating about charging place.
Looks like I need to think again.

I appreciate all responses.
Thank you
 

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There are Volt owners who rarely if ever charge their Volt, run mostly on gas. You can't fully charge a Volt using the internal gas engine. You can build up a 20% battery reserve using mountain mode (Gen II Volt) or 40% (Gen I Volt) but mountain mode is specifically intended for building up a reserve in advance of ascending mountain roads.

The Volt was designed to charge at home using Level I or Level II charging. The Volt does not offer DC Fast Charging. Some Volt owners do not have a place to charge at home but they can charge at work so that is one possibility if you have a way of charging at your workplace. If you charge using a 110V outlet (Level I charging) it will take between 14 and 19 hours for a full charge depending on whether you charge at the default 8 amp setting (19 hours) or can charge at 12 amps (14 hours). Level II charging is quicker, 4.5 hours for 240V/16 amp charging. Commercial public charging stations are usually 208V/16 amp so charging will take a bit longer. If you can find a free Level II charging location that would be ideal but you would need 5.5 hours for a full charge using 208V/16 amps.


Until the DC Fast charging infrastructure is more fully implemented apartment dwellers will not be able to take part in the EV revolution. Car sharing ventures such as Maven are currently offering Volt and Bolt vehicles in CA. Depending on where you live you may be able to sign up with Maven.

You may want to look into the local DC Fast charging options close to where you live or work. While the Volt does not support DC Fast Charging the Chevy Bolt EV (a different vehicle) does offer combined charging system (CCS) fast charging port as an option in addition to Level I and Level II charging (Level II at up to 240V/32 amps for 25 miles of EV range per hour.) The Bolt has an estimated EV range of 238 miles and optionally supports DC Fast Charging/CCS at up to 80kw for 90 miles of range in about 30 minutes of charging however most DC Fast Charging stations are currently limited to 50kw so it would take longer than 30 minutes of charging for 90 additional miles of range. Depending on how many miles you drive daily/weekly you might only need to a top off charge of a Chevy Bolt via CCS for half an hour to an hour, once or twice a week.
A BEV, especially a Bolt, is a bad idea for anyone who doesn't have access to a home EVSE. Under the best of circumstances charging a Bolt at a DC Fast charger will take an hour, but that assumes that there is a CCS charger nearby, unlikely, that the CCS charger can charge at 50KW/h, some are only 25KW/h, and that it's always in order, we've all experienced Level 2 destination chargers that are out of order. A Volt is usable without charging although under those circumstances you will be paying about $10K more than a Malibu Hybrid for a car that is effectively just a smaller hybrid.
 

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A BEV, especially a Bolt, is a bad idea for anyone who doesn't have access to a home EVSE.
Not necessarily. Even if you did not have the ability to charge at home you might have access to Level II charging at work. While DC Fast Charging stations are not that common yet they are increasingly becoming available in many local shopping/dining destinations. Public Level II charging stations are available in many places now. Someone who drives 15 miles per day, ~100 miles per week could get by without the ability to charge at home.
 

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I live in an apartment and I own two Volts. My complex has garages I can rent and the garages have outlets that I can plug into and get all the free electricity I can use. Does your complex have garages or can you plug in at work? If not, then unfortunately, a plug-in hybrid or BEV is not a good option for you, you'll want to stick to a conventional hybrid.
 

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Not necessarily. Even if you did not have the ability to charge at home you might have access to Level II charging at work. While DC Fast Charging stations are not that common yet they are increasingly becoming available in many local shopping/dining destinations. Public Level II charging stations are available in many places now. Someone who drives 15 miles per day, ~100 miles per week could get by without the ability to charge at home.
Every one agrees that if you have charging available at work then that's good enough to buy a Volt, I still wouldn't buy a Bolt under those circumstances.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you for all advice.
I think I have to consider again.

I just have a quick search about hybrid cars.
Price and ACC are most important factor.

I found Hyundai Ioniq has ACC ( they called it as Smart Cruise Control , I believe it is ACC )
and its MSRP is just 25K. though I can't expect any rebate from state or federal.


May I ask about this vehicle?
Anyone have looked into this car?
 

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Thank you for all advice.
I think I have to consider again.

I just have a quick search about hybrid cars.
Price and ACC are most important factor.

I found Hyundai Ioniq has ACC ( they called it as Smart Cruise Control , I believe it is ACC )
and its MSRP is just 25K. though I can't expect any rebate from state or federal.


May I ask about this vehicle?
Anyone have looked into this car?
The IRS credit is for EVs only not hybrids, the Volt gets the full $7500 Federal credit, the Prius Prime only gets $4500 because it's battery is so small. However a Malibu Hybrid is $10K cheaper than a Volt so the cost is about the same as the Volt minus state and federal credits.

One more thing, make sure you get a car that supports Android Auto and Apple Car Play. Built in nav systems are just sad when compared to Google Maps, not only is the navigation much better but the voice recognition in Android Auto works, it doesn't in built in systems. GM, Honda, Audi all support AA and CP, I don't know about Hyundai but I think they do, Toyota, Ford don't they have their own stuff so I would avoid them, not sure about Mercedes, last year when I was shopping they had never heard of Android Auto.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
One more thing, make sure you get a car that supports Android Auto and Apple Car Play. Built in nav systems are just sad when compared to Google Maps, not only is the navigation much better but the voice recognition in Android Auto works, it doesn't in built in systems. GM, Honda, Audi all support AA and CP, I don't know about Hyundai but I think they do, Toyota, Ford don't they have their own stuff so I would avoid them, not sure about Mercedes, last year when I was shopping they had never heard of Android Auto.
yes, Apple Car Play is another important factor to me too. so I'm trying to avoid Toyota's Prius.
And according to their homepage ( hyundai ), Ioniq supports Car Play as well.
 

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However a Malibu Hybrid is $10K cheaper than a Volt so the cost is about the same as the Volt minus state and federal credits.
Volt MSRP is $33,220 and Malibu Hybrid MSRP is $28,750, for a difference of $4,470, how do you figure Malibu is $10k cheaper?
 

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Thank you for all advice.
I think I have to consider again.

I just have a quick search about hybrid cars.
Price and ACC are most important factor.

I found Hyundai Ioniq has ACC ( they called it as Smart Cruise Control , I believe it is ACC )
and its MSRP is just 25K. though I can't expect any rebate from state or federal.


May I ask about this vehicle?
Anyone have looked into this car?
The Hyundai Ioniq is fairly new hybrid, I have not read much about the vehicle. Other hybrid vehicles to consider are the Ford Fusion hybrid and Ford C-Max hybrid. Ford's Sync 3 Infotainment system now supports CarPlay an Android Auto. ACC is available on the standard Fusion, not sure about the Fusion hybrid and C-Max hybrid. These two models are also available as a plug-in hybrid as Fusion Energi and C-Max-Energi, each with 22 miles of estimated EV range.
 

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Volt MSRP is $33,220 and Malibu Hybrid MSRP is $28,750, for a difference of $4,470, how do you figure Malibu is $10k cheaper?
I was comparing the Volt Premier which is $39K, when I Googled Malibu Hybrid there it came up as 27,875, there doesn't seem to be a Malibu Hybrid Premier (at least Google doesn't know about it) but the regular Malibu Premier is $30K.
 

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Thank you for all advice.
I think I have to consider again.

I just have a quick search about hybrid cars.
Price and ACC are most important factor.

I found Hyundai Ioniq has ACC ( they called it as Smart Cruise Control , I believe it is ACC )
and its MSRP is just 25K. though I can't expect any rebate from state or federal.


May I ask about this vehicle?
Anyone have looked into this car?
You don't necessarily have to charge all the time. The car works fine with gas only. Then. Opportunistically charge at any public charging station. Get a preview of where they might be by looking at PlugShare.com or downloading the PlugShare app. California is probably the best place to find plugs everywhere.

If the plan is to drive all electric and always rent an apartment, then move.

I'd never buy a Hyundai or a first year model of anything.
 

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I was comparing the Volt Premier which is $39K, when I Googled Malibu Hybrid there it came up as 27,875, there doesn't seem to be a Malibu Hybrid Premier (at least Google doesn't know about it) but the regular Malibu Premier is $30K.
The volt gets a $7500 fed tax credit and a $1500 Cali rebate. The Malibu gets nothing. So the prices of the two cars are pretty much the same. The Malibu is definitely bigger but its trunk space leaves a lot to be desired, since it has a battery back there.
 
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