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Discussion Starter #1
I'm thinking about switching to a new Volt from a 2016 Civic and am wondering how these two technologies compare between the two cars. I don't think test driving a Volt will tell me much, because you don't really get a feel for the strengths and weaknesses of the underlying algorithms until you've driven in a variety of different situations.

So, I'm hoping to find someone who's actually daily-driven both a Gen2 Volt with ACC and any newer Honda model with ACC and LKAS who can tell me how they compare in real-world use.

I'm pretty happy with Honda's implementation of both in my Civic, but please don't suggest I just get a Clarity instead - I can't get past how odd they look :D
 

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I'm thinking about switching to a new Volt from a 2016 Civic and am wondering how these two technologies compare between the two cars. I don't think test driving a Volt will tell me much, because you don't really get a feel for the strengths and weaknesses of the underlying algorithms until you've driven in a variety of different situations.

So, I'm hoping to find someone who's actually daily-driven both a Gen2 Volt with ACC and any newer Honda model with ACC and LKAS who can tell me how they compare in real-world use.

I'm pretty happy with Honda's implementation of both in my Civic, but please don't suggest I just get a Clarity instead - I can't get past how odd they look :D
Why don't you test drive a 2018 or 2019 Volt that specifically has ACC (it will have LKA because it must have Driver Confidence Package and Driver Confidence Package #2) ACC in the Volt Premier can be engaged at any speed above 15 MPH. LKA in the Volt only operates at speeds 35MPH and faster. LKA is best used on the highway where there are well defined lanes and shoulder lines. LKA can help you to stay centered in your lane, guide you back if you start to drift out of lane. LKA is not autopilot and you must keep at least one hand on the steering wheel at all times. Of the two, I give the Volt's LKA a score of 2 or 3 out of 10. I give the Volt's ACC an 8 or 9 out of 10. What would make it better? To see two cars ahead of the Volt to changes in traffic conditions. Also, to be able to start automatically after coming to a full stop (currently you must tap the accelerator pedal or the resume button on the steering wheel.) Also, when using ACC in local driving and slower highway traffic frequently the vehicle that ACC has locked onto using radar will change lanes such as when getting ready to turn. This opens up a gap in front of the Volt. Instead of passively maintaining current speed and scanning for a new lead vehicle the Volt will start to accelerate to the current ACC speed setting. This could be 20 or more MPH faster than the current traffic speed. It is easy enough to disengage the ACC at this poing by pressing the cancel button, pulling the regen paddle or touching the brake but the ACC should not behave so aggressively.
 

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LKA in GMs is just a safety system.
The Volt's is not that good. The ones with seat vibrators are much better, like the Cadillacs.

The ACC/AEB rocks. It's very good. Better than normal hybrids or conventional cars. It has 3 settings, about 1.5 sec, 2.0 sec, 3.0 sec of following distance. It will hit the brakes HARD when necessary, and has an array of 6 bright red HUD LEDs to warning you of impending collision, but it will hit the brakes hard if you don't.
It's smooth when set to 2 or 3, but when set to the shortest following distance can be a little too jumpy, but that's because you are too close for the smoothest ride possible, and you will drive just a poorly as the car in front you. ie- If you are following a good driver, setting 1 is smooth. If you are following a spaz, setting 1 will make you a spaz just like them. If you are following a spaz, setting 2 or 3 is smooth.
 

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I have both a Gen2 Volt and a Honda CR-V with Honda Sensing. ACC is great in both cars. I have to agree that sometimes the Volt wants to accelerate too hard to try to keep up with the car in front. I'll have to experiment to see if changing it to the middle or far setting affects this, but I still like it very much. The Honda will usually come to a complete stop and then start up again whereas on the Volt you have to tap the accelerator or hit resume after coming to a complete stop with ACC. For me ACC is a tie for both cars.

LKA is not very sensitive in the Volt. It does nothing until you get near the edge of the lane and then it nudges you back in. The Honda however tries to keep you exactly centered in the lane. The problem with that is that you still have to have your hand on the wheel and I don't like the car constantly moving the steering wheel while I'm driving. So I usually turn this off in the Honda whereas I leave it on all of the time in the Volt. So for me the Volt wins for LKA.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I have both a Gen2 Volt and a Honda CR-V with Honda Sensing. ACC is great in both cars. I have to agree that sometimes the Volt wants to accelerate too hard to try to keep up with the car in front. I'll have to experiment to see if changing it to the middle or far setting affects this, but I still like it very much. The Honda will usually come to a complete stop and then start up again whereas on the Volt you have to tap the accelerator or hit resume after coming to a complete stop with ACC. For me ACC is a tie for both cars.

LKA is not very sensitive in the Volt. It does nothing until you get near the edge of the lane and then it nudges you back in. The Honda however tries to keep you exactly centered in the lane. The problem with that is that you still have to have your hand on the wheel and I don't like the car constantly moving the steering wheel while I'm driving. So I usually turn this off in the Honda whereas I leave it on all of the time in the Volt. So for me the Volt wins for LKA.
Thanks! I appreciate the other replies too, but this type of comparison is really what I was looking for.

I've noticed that with my Honda also - it can come to a full stop for a second or two then resume moving itself if the car ahead moves. Longer than that and it will stop totally and require tapping the gas or hitting resume.

One problem I've noticed with this is that in full stop-and-go traffic, when you hit resume it pauses for a little bit before going, then seems to realize the car ahead is too far ahead so it surges forward, then realizes it's moving a lot faster than the car ahead and jams on the brakes. You kind of feel like you're riding a bucking bronco or something. I've heard newer Hondas are better about this.

It sounds like I won't like the LKA in the Volt as much. I use it to keep me in the center of the lane when I have like a Slurpee or milkshake that I'm frequently holding with one hand and stirring with the other. And often on long trips, I'll drive for a while with no hands on the wheel. Maybe the CR-V is different, but mine gives you 15 seconds hands-free before it beeps at you and you have to touch the wheel for a second. So I just drive along touching the wheel once every 15 seconds. If the Volt's LKA has you ping-ponging from side to side in the lane, I don't think I'll use it like this.
 
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