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Has anyone already assembled a list of useful PIDs and such for Torque and the Volt?

Browsing the Torque-bhp forums it looks like someone might have been working on a Volt specific plug-in.
Do you know if Torque uses the "Monitor All" mode yet (where it can passively monitor what is being sent on the CAN bus, rather than just requesting certain IDs)? If so, there is a wealth of information that you can obtain (lat/lon, speed, brake/accelerator position, doors open, seatbelts, etc.). Otherwise, I believe you're limited to the generic OBD2 codes (most of which are emissions-related, and therefore gas engine related).
 

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That's a counterfeit one ["Some clone makers have introduced what they call a 'v1.4a', or
a 'v1.5', or a 'v1.5a' but Elm Electronics has never made one."], don't buy it. The counterfeit ones use a fake ELM chip, that probably works, but cheats the makers of the real ELM chip.

I bought the ScanTool one, for about $30. If you use the Monitor All mode, it's not perfect (the ELM 327 chip is a bit too slow to keep up with all the data for the Volt), but I am not aware of any issues with requesting PIDs the way I believe Torque does it.
 

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I'm assuming NOT on the "Monitor All" mode. I think the data flow would overwhelm the bluetooth interface as other threads have noted.
Correct. It is much better to use a USB (or wireless) interface if using "Monitor All".

The Volt specific PIDs should allow us to peek into all those things beyond the generic OBD2 codes. Torque has support for adding vehicle individual specific PIDs, like the Prius' hybrid components. Torque also has support for the development of add-ins that can bundle a bunch of vehicle specific PIDs.
The catch here is that GM requires megabucks in licensing fees for that data (rumors of $50K to sign, and perhaps a per-user fee as well). The Torque developers would have to buy a license, and almost certainly charge you (which, as you can imagine, would be very unlikely!). I believe the DashDaq people charge $100 (in addition to the fee for standard GM PIDs, that are beyond the generic PIDs but apply to most/all GM cars).

some of the most requested gauges I see for the Volt are things like a instantaneous Miles per kWh meter and a trip average Miles per kWh display. Taking from my Prius display I would like to have a "kWh regenerated" bar graph.

A pie chart display of where energy is allocated (climate, propulsion, lights, accessories), both instantaneous as well as for the trip would be interesting. I liked wizkid's approach to describing loads like climate in terms of EV range.
And that's why few people are using Torque. It's great -- but severely limited for the Volt, since it doesn't do "Monitor All".

Right now, the two main options are either using DashDaq (which is easy to use, but expensive) or custom software using an OBD2 interface (such as my program for Windows, which is free but not as easy to use). The custom software route is going slowly, as there is very little interest in it for the Volt (unlike the Tesla and Leaf, where they already have hardware devices that can connect to the OBD2 port). But, that is good for GM -- it means (from purely unscientific data) that the Volt is being bought by "average" people rather than geeks.
 

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This should be a matter of getting a list of the custom PIDS, just like the list that is available for the Prius.
Yes, exactly the same -- feel free to give GM a call and get a license. :)
 

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What is your custom software doing? processing the output from a "Monitor All" or using discovered PIDs and processing the output?

The DashDaq seems like a great tool but expensive for the curious Volt. Torque and a Bluetooth OBD2 interface are inexpensive and have some support for the Volt if we can find and share the specific PIDs.

As individuals using the PIDs, I think we are covered under "fair use". I can see someone like Torque and DashDaq having to license the information from GM since they are selling a tool. Torque seems to skate around the issue by just letting end users input the PIDs themselves, like putting phone numbers in your mobile phone without paying 411 fees.
The software I wrote simply does "Monitor All", and I've reverse engineered most of the important (to me, at least) information. So I know, for example, the CAN ID 206 give you the battery SOC. When I bought the OBD2 adapter, nobody knew (well, outside of GM, from what I can tell) that there was information freely floating about the CAN bus. I figured I would just get the generic PIDs and hopefully discover other ones. But after seeing all that was available on the bus without any effort, I just focused on that.

As for fair use, that gets a bit tricky, if GM copyrighted the data (which they almost certainly did). But regardless of the legality, I'm sure that GM isn't going to sue someone paying in the order of $40K for a car for using the data.

It should be possible for someone with a DashDaq to get an OBD2 port splitter (Y-adapter or the like), and have one program doing a "Monitor All" while the DashDaq sends out commands. It would be a somewhat large undertaking (the DashDaq has a lot of Volt-specific data), but probably could be done.

I had posted quite a time back about the desire to have the PIDs, and got a response from someone from GM that they would look into it and let me know if it might be possible (with no further communication). My first goal was to collect data on trips so that you can find the most energy-efficient routes to take (which could benefit GM a lot in the long run).
 

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That's a counterfeit one ["Some clone makers have introduced what they call a 'v1.4a', or
a 'v1.5', or a 'v1.5a' but Elm Electronics has never made one."], don't buy it. The counterfeit ones use a fake ELM chip, that probably works, but cheats the makers of the real ELM chip.

I bought the ScanTool one, for about $30. If you use the Monitor All mode, it's not perfect (the ELM 327 chip is a bit too slow to keep up with all the data for the Volt), but I am not aware of any issues with requesting PIDs the way I believe Torque does it.
I don't know anything about counterfeit. I just know that it's bluetooth and plugs into the OBD II port. Yours isn't wireless and I don't want to mess with wires. Is their another one you would recommend for $20-30?

Also, Leaf'ers are able to plug into their RS232 as well. It'd be nice to know as much as they know about their cars.
 

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I don't know anything about counterfeit. I just know that it's bluetooth and plugs into the OBD II port. Yours isn't wireless and I don't want to mess with wires. Is their another one you would recommend for $20-30?

Also, Leaf'ers are able to plug into their RS232 as well. It'd be nice to know as much as they know about their cars.
A company called Elm Electronics makes a chip called the ELM 327 that is commonly used in OBD2 interfaces. Not surprisingly, there are a lot of cheap Chinese OBD2 interfaces. The problem, though, is that they claim to use a real ELM 327 chip (as opposed to being compatible with it, which is probably OK). The real ELM 327 chip doesn't have a v1.5, which means that if they are advertising that theirs uses v1.5, it is a counterfeit chip.

I'm not familiar with the Bluetooth OBD2 interfaces, perhaps someone else can chime in (or, you could always try the one you found, and see how it goes). If people can find a way to get the Volt PIDs, a Bluetooth connector would be great (I need the USB to handle all the data that the Volt sends, but that isn't necessary if you have the Volt PIDs and can request whatever you need, as Torque does).
 

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Any PIDs you have collected would be welcome :)
I've got a lot of the passive ones (Monitor All) at http://www.evtools.info/ChevyVoltOBD2CAN.html . Unfortunately, I don't think those can be converted to be used with Torque (as a different format is used for making the requests). If they can be converted, though, we wouldn't need anything from GM to get Torque to do some pretty cool stuff.
 

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A company called Elm Electronics makes a chip called the ELM 327 that is commonly used in OBD2 interfaces. Not surprisingly, there are a lot of cheap Chinese OBD2 interfaces. The problem, though, is that they claim to use a real ELM 327 chip (as opposed to being compatible with it, which is probably OK). The real ELM 327 chip doesn't have a v1.5, which means that if they are advertising that theirs uses v1.5, it is a counterfeit chip.

I'm not familiar with the Bluetooth OBD2 interfaces, perhaps someone else can chime in (or, you could always try the one you found, and see how it goes). If people can find a way to get the Volt PIDs, a Bluetooth connector would be great (I need the USB to handle all the data that the Volt sends, but that isn't necessary if you have the Volt PIDs and can request whatever you need, as Torque does).
I'll probably wait to buy one since it doesn't seem very useful yet. Good luck, I hope you get it figured out.
 

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Anybody try Laplogger? I would really like to be able to do this from my BlackBerry. The only thing I am interested in is a real time readout on SOC. This should really have been provided on one of the info screens.

LAPLOGGER scanner and Software Bundle Simple interface and software for your diagnostics, Readiness flags to check if your vehicle is ready for an emission test and log capabilities to dissect paramater behaviour. Mode 6 for CAN and before,MPG option available. Logs can be plotted, exported to Excel and more. Support for ELM32x command set and 3rd party software. Full versions for Android BlackBerry Windows Mobile included in the bundle.
 

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I'm looking to buy torque for android. It's been a few months since the last posting on this thread.
Is the new $20 ELM327 chip good enough to stream data off of the volt yet, or is DashDaq the way to go?

For those who don't know what we're talking about, here is background info:

Bluetooth 'ELM 327' chip OBD2 adapters that work with your android phone:
http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=sr_st?keywords=elm+327&qid=1368461343&rh=n:15684181,k:elm+327&sort=pmrank

Torque Software:
http://torque-bhp.com/software/torque-android-obd2-adapters/

And screenshots of the Torque app (click 'app screenshots'):
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=org.prowl.torque&hl=en
 

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That's a counterfeit one ["Some clone makers have introduced what they call a 'v1.4a', or
a 'v1.5', or a 'v1.5a' but Elm Electronics has never made one."], don't buy it. The counterfeit ones use a fake ELM chip, that probably works, but cheats the makers of the real ELM chip.

I bought the ScanTool one, for about $30. If you use the Monitor All mode, it's not perfect (the ELM 327 chip is a bit too slow to keep up with all the data for the Volt), but I am not aware of any issues with requesting PIDs the way I believe Torque does it.
i am seeing scantool is out of order. Anywhere else to look other than Amazon? Or other legit alternative devices?
 
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