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This is my review, my experience installing the AmazingE Fast 32 EVSE. I recently upgraded my home charging setup, swapping out my trusty ClipperCreek LCS-20P EVSE for one of the new AmazingE Fast 32 EVSE. In theory this upgrade doubles my maximum charging amperage and charging power (from 3.8kW to 7.7kW); more on that later.

I drove a 2017 Chevrolet Volt Premier for 4 years. During most of that time I charged at home using the LCS-20 equipped with with the NEMA 14-50 plug. The 2017 Volt was capable of charging at a maximum of 240V and 16 amps (3.6kW) so the LCS-20 EVSE was perfectly sized for charging a 2017 Gen 2 Volt.

In June 2020 I replaced my 2017 Volt with a 2020 Tesla Model Y Long Range AWD. I immediately started charging the Tesla using the same LCS-20 that I used with the Volt. The only difference is that to charge a Tesla vehicle using a Level 1 or Level 2 EVSE equipped with a J1772 charging connector you must also use the Tesla J1772 charging adapter that comes with every new Tesla vehicle. Additional Tesla J1772 charging adapters are available from the Tesla Store for $95 US in case you want to keep one at home and one in the vehicle or just have a spare Tesla J1772 charging adapter.
When charging my 2017 Volt the LCS-20 was able to fully charge the 2017 Volt's battery pack (~14kWh usable) in 4 hours and 30 to 40 minutes. A 25% charge took ~1 hour and 10 minutes. For the Tesla Model Y Long Range (74kWh usable battery capacity) the same 1 hour and 10 minutes netted approx. a 5% charge. Now this was not normally a problem but you can see how a 25% charge would take almost 6 hours using the LCS-20.
While waiting for my Model Y to be delivered I noted, some months back, that ClipperCreek started selling a new 32 amp version of the AmazingE Level 2 EVSE known as the Fast 32. Those familiar with ClipperCreek and with AmazingE may be aware that the AmazingE 16 amp Level 2 EVSE uses a ClipperCreek circuit board inside the electronics package (brick) of the EVSE. The AmazingE 16 amp EVSE is assembled off shore (I'm not sure where exactly.) Likewise, the AmazingE Fast 32 (32 amp capable) Level 2 EVSE uses ClipperCreek circuitry. The AmazingE Fast32 is assembled in Mexico. The limited warranty, 3 years, is the same as for the ClipperCreek branded EVSE units.
Originally I considered using the Tesla Mobile Connector (Tesla's portable Level 1 / Level 2 EVSE) with a NEMA 14-50 plug adapter ($35 from the Tesla Store.) I ran into an issue with each of Tesla's current charging options; namely the Tesla charging cord is too short for my needs. The ClipperCreek LCS-20 has a 25 foot long charging cord and I need almost all of that length to reach the charging port on the Tesla (the charging port is located on the driver's side rear tail light.) To use the Tesla Mobile Connector (also the current Gen 3 Tesla Wall Connector) I would have to back my Model Y into my garage to be able to reach the charge port. Largely based on this limitation of Tesla's home and mobile charging solutions I decided to upgrade my home charging setup to the AmazingE Fast 32, replacing my current LCS-20 Level 2 EVSE.
ClipperCreek also offers the HCS series of Level 2 EVSE, the closest in capacity to the AmazingE Fast32 is the HCS-40P with NEMA 14-50 plug. I found the HCS series of EVSE to be too large to easily install in my home charging space. The NEMA 14-50 power plug on both the AmazingE Fast 32 and the ClipperCreek HCS-40P is less than 12 inches, probably because some of the power cord length is hidden inside the plug and inside EVSE housing. I have included a photo of my original LCS-20 and the new Fast32 EVSE to illustrate just how similarly sized the Fast32 is compared to the LCS-20. The power cord on the Fast32 enters the EVSE electronics housing from the top, as with the LCS-20. This simplifies the installation in my setup.
I ordered the AmazingE Fast 32 from the ClipperCreek web site, I received my order in less than a week with normal UPS ground shipping. In addition to the Fast32 I ordered the ClipperCreek cable cradle as unlike the charging cord on the LCS-20 the charging cord on the Fast 32 is as thick as a 5/8" garden hose and cannot be wrapped over the Fast32 housing as with the thinner LCS-20 charging cord.
Installing the AmazingE Fast 32 was straight forward as the NEMA 14-50 plug makes this a plug and play operation. Always disconnect the charging connector/adapter from the vehicle first, then turn off the power at the electric service panel or sub panel before unplugging or plugging in any EVSE.
I was able to reuse of the one of the wall anchors from the LCS-20 EVSE, had to drill one new hole for the lower wall attachment point (unlike the LCS-20 that had 4 wall anchor points the Fast 32 only has two anchor points.) The anchor holes are located to the left of the Fast 32 electronics housing. The Fast 32 housing is 13.5 inches long, about 2.5 inches longer than the LCS-20 housing. In my installation I had to drill the second anchor hole in solid brick so that the NEMA 14-50P (plug) had the proper distance, radius.
The installation of the Fast 32 had to account for the curvature of the 14-50 plug wire in a 90 degreee installation in relation to the NEMA 14-50R (receptacle.) Back in 2016 I had my electrician install the LCS-20 in this 90 degree left orientation. At that time I asked the electrician if the orientation of the NEMA 14-50R was specified in the electrical code. My electrician, a Master Electrician of perhaps 40 years experience, told me that the code did not specify the orientation. (I mention this because the AmazingE User Manual states that the NEMA 14-50R must be oriented with the ground pin at the top. Maybe this matters for outdoor installations. My NEMA 14-50R is indoors in my garage.)
I had to drill the second anchor hole in solid brick. I don't own an impact drill so this took some time, quite a bit of sweat. I dulled several masonry bits while drilling a 5/16", 1" deep hole in one really hard brick. If not for needing to drill into brick the installation would have taken almost no time at all. I have enclosed a photo of the installed AmazingE Fast 32 with the cable cradle underneath the EVSE housing.
After using a shop vacuum to clean up the area around the newly installed EVSE I set the charging limit on my Model Y to 90%. The Model Y was at 78% SOC so this would be a 1 hour and 40 minute charging session. I used the Tesla J1772 adapter with the AmazingE J1772 connector and plugged into the Model Y. The Model Y ramped up charging to 31 out of a possible 32 amps, showed 7kW charging level.
The garage temperature was right around 90F, the AmazingE was already at the ambient garage temperature when I started charging. I don't know exactly why charging was limited to 31 amps instead of 32 amps. It could the high ambient temperature but it could also be that the either the Tesla on-board charging circuitry or the AmazingE EVSE detected the additional resistance of the Tesla Charging Adapter and throttled back from 32 amps to 31 amps. I will have to observe several more charging sessions to learn if this setup will charge at the rated 32 amps. The voltage during the charging session was mostly around 230V as this was during the peak of the afternoon heat, my home AC was running. Normally I charge at home in the evening, after 7PM. For this first charging session I wanted charge when the garage was warmest as a sort of stress test.
Charging completed after almost 2 hours. The Tesla Charging Adapter and the J1772 connector remained cool to my touch. The charging cable became warm to my touch throughout its 25 foot length. The AmazingE Fast 32 housing was warm to the touch, warmest in the middle of the housing but never to warm to comfortably touch. The power cord was warm as was the NEMA 14-50 plug. The housing of the NEMA 14-50 receptacle did not feel warm to my hand.
I don't know if the AmazingE Fast 32 will ultimately be as reliable and dependable as the ClipperCreek LCS-20 has been for me for almost 4 years now. As a backup for home charging my Tesla Model Y I now have the Tesla Mobil Connector (with both the bundled NEMA 5-15 power plug and also the separately priced $35 NEMA 14-50 power plug.) When used with the interchangeable, modular NEMA 14-50 power plug the Tesla Mobile Connector can charge at up to 32 amps. (There is a separate Tesla Mobil Connector that is fitted with a fixed NEMA 14-50 plug that can charge at up to 40 amps.)
I am going to shortly list my ClipperCreek LCS-20P with NEMA 14-50 plug for sale on the GM-Volt forum. The LCS-20 is a great Level 2 EVSE for charging any Gen 1 or Gen 2 Volt. I hope that after reading this review that anyone who might be planning to upgrade or install a 32 amp Level 2 EVSE for their home charging needs considers the AmazingE Fast 32.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Here are the photos:

AmazingE Fast 32 Unboxing 1.jpeg


AmazingE Fast 32 Unboxing 2.jpeg


LCS-20.jpeg


AmazingE Fast 32 Installed.jpeg


Model Y Charging Screen.jpeg
 
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I want to note that the reason this charging session took longer than the estimated 1 hour; 35 minutes is I was sitting in my Model Y, listening to music for the last 40 minutes of the charging session. I had the HVAC running, set to 69F. After charging completed the Model Y continued to draw 5 kW (mostly for the HVAC) so only 2kW was available during that time for charging.
 
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