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Had to replace engine radiator.
Done and used 50/50 Dexcool with water. Not sure if it was de-ionized water.
And topped off the battery and trans cooling systems with the same.
So...I think I understand the problems and mistakes I made.
But now...
1. Exactly what coolant do I need for each system. (I thought one was different).
2. How much coolant is in each system?
3. Where are the drains for each system?
4. Is there anything I need to know about this flushing process?
My plan is to drain, install correct coolant, drive for an hour or so, then drain and refill.
5. Last question, please ignore if it is too offensive. Should I take this to a dealer to do and is there one in Detroit that you would recommend. (or a non-dealer, just a Volt fan).
Thank you for reading this.
Got 70,000 miles and LOVE the car. Cannot understand why GM ditched it????
Glenn
 

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1. User Manuals apparently differ but my 2013 says to use deionized Dexcool in all three systems.
2. Coolant amounts are listed in the User's Manual.
4. Coolants are sucked out with a suction device that attaches to the top of the expansion tanks (3). The device uses an air compressor to create the suction, you can pick them up at auto parts discounters for around $200. After a certain suction is reached (21 inches comes to mind) it sucks up the coolant from a container. This procedure leaves minimal air in the system. Through the servicing software the internal pumps are operated so they can hand back the car with no air left in the system so the customer doesn't have to do anything after picking up the car. The assumption is the customer is as dumb as a stump so don't leave anything up to him/her. Not having access to turn on the pumps you can monitor the systems so any air left in the system when it is purged you can top up with mixture.

The vacuum method is used because there are many small passage ways in the battery etc. that the coolant flows through.
Deionized Dexcool is used so it is compatible with the sensors in the system so they won't give erroneous readings and trigger codes.

There are Videos on YouTube on how to do it from Weber Automotive. I'd highly advise you watch these. This is not your father's Oldsmobile.
 

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A dealer can do all 3 systems for you correctly for around $450-500. If you do it yourself, it is important to use GM's pre-mixed DexCool with de-ionized water.
 

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A dealer can do all 3 systems for you correctly for around $450-500. If you do it yourself, it is important to use GM's pre-mixed DexCool with de-ionized water.
Hey Barry, ever seen/heard any issues relating to the subject relating to not changing these particular fluids ?

$500 is a lot to spend and if the risk associated with not doing it is insignificant, then why do it.

Thanks.
 

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Only one tank is hard to do - so what is the dealer willing to charge for only one or 2 ?

Other than trigging the float switch problem - I may do the suck out 1/2 fill - wait and repeat a few times on the main battery coolent tank.

( will let others do the math for number of 1/2 refills per $100 )

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use WOT plug or have 12 Volt battery off will keep low fluid sensor in check.
 

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Hey Barry, ever seen/heard any issues relating to the subject relating to not changing these particular fluids ?

$500 is a lot to spend and if the risk associated with not doing it is insignificant, then why do it.

Thanks.
The DexCool coolant will, over time, start to degrade. Initially non-conductive the degraded DexCool will release ions that can conduct an electrical current; what the DexCool coolant is formulated to avoid. Worst case, this will trigger a battery error code and brick the Volt. Will it happen at 5 years + 1 month? Probably not but why take the chance.
 

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Hey Barry, ever seen/heard any issues relating to the subject relating to not changing these particular fluids ?

$500 is a lot to spend and if the risk associated with not doing it is insignificant, then why do it.

Thanks.
Ignoring the service schedule (which is really preventive maintenance) seems penny-wise and dollar-foolish to me. Some argued that Gen 1 cars could use regular gas instead of premium. Some ended up with engine problems. Cause and effect? Maybe. I put in premium, I change the oil, I changed the fluids at 5 years, I rotate the tires, etc. Some I can do myself, but even so, they are not that expensive. And then there is the question of warranty support if you skip some of these.
 
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