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After reading a few posts about the lack of a temperature gauge and the potential for head gasket failure, I've started thinking about a way to install one. I see to schools of thought. First is to mount a sensor to the head and run a wire to the gauge or second, find a device that will read the obd2 data and display the value. I like the standalone gauge for its redundancy but I also like the obd2 method for simplicity of install.

So I ask you, my fellow volt owners, what do you think or am I just being paranoid over something not worth worrying about?

I figure I should add that my use of the car is primarily electric, maybe a trip once a year or 2. I have not put gas in since I've owned it.
 

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Drive it and don't worry about it.
 

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I like your ideas, particularly because I've been occasionally experiencing the electrically heated water also going to heat the dormant engine, wasting power and reducing the effectiveness of the electric heater.

A gauge would make it easier to spot this fault. I am reluctant to leave my odb2 bluetooth transponder connected. My dealer said it might be responsible for another fault, as I'd forgotten to remove it before service when I asked about the other fault.

The remaining questions, where do you mount it, how, what style, hmmm.
I'm also waiting for other readers ideas.
 

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It's happened to .001% of the cars. If you go down this over-reaction road your cabin will soon look like an 747's cockpit as there are many other very rare failures that have occurred over the years.
 

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It's happened to .001% of the cars. If you go down this over-reaction road your cabin will soon look like an 747's cockpit as there are many other very rare failures that have occurred over the years.
Cool, a 747 glass cockpit
Bring it!
 

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I'll agree with Steverino... this is a tiny fraction of a percent. Given that 1 in hundreds of thousands of a chance, I'd say that is equal to about any other potential problem. Therefore, monitoring all sensors would be just as warranted as the engine block water temp, thus the ODBII option is the clear choice in your scenario.

I'll point out that that the Volt already does that monitoring for you and will send an error code if things get out of range, but if you are one of those people who would rather be active in monitoring the vehicle, the ODBII appears to be the tool of choice from my perspective. For me personally, I'm much more worried about the more likely event that I get whacked by a distracted driver. Don't let the gauges distract from the greatest risk of catastrophic failure.
 

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I agree with Steverino that it is probably not worth it. Haven't those cases been mostly with Gen 2 anyway? If you do get something, considering you rarely use the engine, I think the OBD route makes most sense. You can set it up for those rare trips and use a smart phone as a display. You can take it down the rest of the time.

I would just note that you really need a warning light rather than an actual temperature display. You can't watch the temp number constantly, so you need something that will draw your attention to it quickly when it goes high.
 

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For the record, I'm one of those people who really likes to know what is going on so I set up Torque and an OBDII reader.

I really enjoyed seeing what was "normal" for the vehicle and watching the interactions over time.
Then I said "well that itch has been scratched" and pulled the tablet and the OBDII reader.

Of course I can hook it all back up anytime if I think something is wrong, it's all pre-set and ready to go (LOL).
 

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Same here Dutch. Although when I do take a trip I tend to keep torque running so I can monitor things. I realize some of the PIDs aren't updated more than once ever few seconds, it will still allow me to watch changes that warrant closer monitoring than otherwise with just a warning notice popping up on the drivers screen.
 

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Lol. It’s a computer-controlled engine. Nothing a human can monitor will be a faster reaction than the computers do.

Just drive and wait for the CEL that will never happen for engine temp. Monitoring temp will not prevent a catestrophic event like a blown head gasket.

This discussion is pushing me to a BEV solution for transportation. Much less moving parts.
 

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So far, I think we've seen now three head gasket failures and all of them seem to have failed BEFORE the car heated up unusually. At least one of those only got found just because the car was drinking coolant.
 
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