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Hello, I drive 40K miles/year. Mainly on highway. I have a BMW 328d xdrive which I plan to preserve and keep it since I like it very much.

I need to select a good commuter. I had a Leaf in the past and the battery degradation and poor range drove me crazy. I simply cannot stand chasing public chargers anymore. I am surprised Leaf and BMW i3 are still selling.
Anyway here is what I think it would cost (new):

Volt about US$29K (after negotiating discounts with dealer).
Chevy Cruze diesel hatch about US$19K.

So I think the Cruze will be about $10,000 cheaper. Personally I think the Cruze is more fun to drive and it has better visibility than the Volt. More interior space and cargo too.

So in 5 years maybe the gas savings using the Volt would break even with the Cruze diesel. Problem is that in 5 years driving at 40K/miles year either car would reach maximum life and it woul die anyway.

So my conclusion is that in my case the Cruze diesel hatch would be more feasible.

please let me know if otherwise.
 

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I tried commuting over 40,000 miles a year in a Volt. I ended up burning too much gasoline and asking myself why I had a PHEV if I was still going to the gas station once a week.

So I transitioned to the Bolt EV, and I haven't looked back since. 60,000 miles and still going strong. And I'm pretty sure it's more fun to drive than either the Volt or the Cruze Diesel. In my opinion, the Bolt EV is a better option than either car you listed, but it sounds like you have already made your mind up about the Cruze.
 

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I commute 30k miles a year in my Volt....mostly highway. August will be 2 years of ownership and I'll hit 55k miles by the end of the week. I'm sitting at 71.5% on electric. Here is my Volt stats link if you want to see https://www.voltstats.net/Stats/Details/8243

In that time, I have rotated tires and done one oil change. The oil is currently at about 50%, so quite a ways to go before I change it again. When shopping, I looked at every diesel option out there, plus Corolla's, Prius, and also compared it to a BMW 3-series because I have always been a BMW guy.....cars and bikes. I have the ability to charge at work, so that figured in as well. I looked at total cost of ownership excluding depreciation because I drive everything I own into the ground. I figured in purchase price minus incentives (-$9500 in my case) and fuel/electric usage for a period of 10 years and/or 300k miles. In the end, the Volt came out ahead of a Prius by about $1000 and $8000 ahead of a VW TDI......the BMW Diesel was over $28000 behind. The Volt is fun to drive, quiet, and the lack of routine maintenance completely sealed the deal.
 

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I tried commuting over 40,000 miles a year in a Volt. I ended up burning too much gasoline and asking myself why I had a PHEV if I was still going to the gas station once a week.

So I transitioned to the Bolt EV, and I haven't looked back since. 60,000 miles and still going strong. And I'm pretty sure it's more fun to drive than either the Volt or the Cruze Diesel. In my opinion, the Bolt EV is a better option than either car you listed, but it sounds like you have already made your mind up about the Cruze.
Compared to the Leaf, don't forget that the Bolt EV actually has a proper battery thermal management system. Battery degradation is unheard of on Volts, which have been around a lot longer, and the Bolt EV uses a similar system (refined at this point). It supports CCS fast charging, and with the range being double what a first-gen leaf is, I think it'd work well for you. Public chargers wouldn't be as critical with such a huge battery. By keeping the BMW, you can use a pure EV for your typical commute. In a situation where you need to go extreme distances, or if for some reason your trip may put you outside of the Bolt's range, just take the other car.

Like others are saying, you really seem to like the Cruze, and if you really like it, by all means go for it. Personally, I can't stand diesels; the fumes trigger migraines for me.
 

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Well, first, you'd also get $7500 back from the feds on the Volt (unless you're not eligible for some reason), so that'd substantially lower the price difference between the Volt and the Cruze. You'd also have to get a fairly optioned mid-upper trim Cruze to get the basic equipment you'll get in the Volt, so I don't know that you'll realistically be able to stay around $19,000, but I don't know your market. I've got a diesel hatch auto with an MSRP of $27,000. I know they're discounted often, but I don't know you'll be able to knock it that low.

I don't know what your parking/car storage situation is either, but doing that much driving, the larger and more spacious Honda Clarity PHEV might also be worth a look. I love my Volt, but my everyday commute is 20-25 minutes each way, and I'm not sure I'd love the seats/seating position for a very long every day commute. While people complain (probably too much) that the Clarity won't stay in full EV mode under hard acceleration, that's not that big a deal for you since you'll be using the engine a good bit on long highway stretches anyway.

At 40,000 miles annually, I have you driving about 160 miles per day, so your EV usage would be about 30% with the Volt or Clarity if only charging at home. While not a terrific ratio, both are also excellent on gas (comparable or better than the Cruze diesel) on the highway, and gas has been cheaper than diesel of late.

If you can't charge at work, I say it's a toss-up and go with the car you like to be in and enjoy driving the most. If you can charge at work, I'd still say get the car you want, but I'd note that the base model Volt or Clarity will make up some of the cost difference pretty quickly.

If you're keeping the BMW for occasional very long trips, the Bolt EV could be a great choice for commuting if you can charge at home each night on a Level 2 charger. You'd recover 25 miles of EV range per hour of charge time, with a full range of 238 miles. So you'd return home with 40-100 miles of range left (wide range depending on temperature, traffic, and weather conditions). Level 2 would add 25 miles per hour charging, so if you have 8 hours at home, you'd easily replenish the full charge each night and have a nice range buffer for traffic/weather/detours. I don't know the nature of your work, though, and if it involves sporadic long trips to meet clients and the like, I could see that becoming a chore. With the far greater (3x) range, you'll find yourself chasing chargers a lot less with a much longer range and better built battery than the sub-100 mile Leaf.
 

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You need to take state (if any) and federal (if eligible) tax credits into account for a fair cost comparison. I doubt a base Cruze is as nice as a base Volt, but I don't know specifics.

Have you driven the Volt? Mine cruises very well on the highway, but I haven't driven a Cruze for comparison so I can't comment. I just know there are many previous Prius drivers here who say the Volt is a much better road trip car, so even if you might burn a little more gas in the long run, the comfort and performance makes up for it. I don't know how comfortable the Cruze is, but that is something to consider.

Really, once you take tax credits and such into TCO, the two might be similar at 5 years (depends on your local electric/gas prices and charging opportunities). So just test drive both, especially on the highway, and go with what you like the best.
 

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The Volt has no transmission a Cruze has a horrible high gear count transmission that's hunting all the time at low speeds. I drove Cruze as a loaner when my Volt was in for some service, hated it, it was so incredibly unrefined compared to the Volt. If you are buying this year you will still get the Federal tax credit plus any state rebate that your state might offer, in my case that's an additional $2.5K, so the price of the Volt and the Cruze would be exactly the same.

Others have mentioned the Bolt, if I were you that's what I would do because your whole commute will be electric. GM knows how to build battery packs, Nissan doesn't, so your past experience with the Leaf isn't relevant. Chevy battery packs are water cooled, the Leafs aren't (although rumor is that the upcoming Leaf 60KWh battery will be water cooled and will also use LG batteries like the Bolt, so that problem might be going away in the 2019 Leafs).
 

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Your life, your money, your choice. As another poster commented, you seem pretty attached to the diesel option already.

Did you actually test drive both cars first? There should be no comparison - the Volt is both faster and zippier, with instant torque, no shifting, and a lower cg for better handling.

This year, I wouldn't buy a new car for a 150+ mile per day freeway commute without adaptive cruise - an option on Premier Volts, but not available on the Cruze as far as I can tell.

I'm also surprised you feel there's such a difference in visibility - the two are built on the same platform, so they should have very similar sight lines.

When you're doing all this complex math about pay back periods, keep in mind that gas prices might go up radically - and that resale value of the diesel is more likely to tank over time, though at the rate you're driving neither one may have much left when you're done.
 

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Diesel fuel is usually more expensive than regular 87 octane, and also the diesel urea tank must be filled as well.
Our 2016 Volt Premier has nearly 14,000 miles just on gas. Per voltstats.net cs (gas only mpg is 48.16) since new.

I'm pretty sure a cruze diesel auto would probably not have achieved much more mpg's than a volt. There is probably more to maintain with the diesel.

As far as price a new Volt LT if one does their homework with a $7,500 Fed tax credit you could bring the price of a new Volt down to $20,000 or so or maybe lower in states that allow an additional rebate.

The Volt also has the ability to run just on electric as well, and the 2019 Volt you will have the option of a full charge in a little over 2 hours.

It may be more fun driving a 5 speed manual Cruze Diesel, but not fun in bumper to bumper traffic for miles....
 

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If it matters to you and you need a tie breaker, the Cruze hatch is built in Mexico while the Volt is built in Michigan with 66% US/Canadian content.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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As noted by others, Adaptive Cruise would be nice for your commute. It's another reason I'd look at a Clarity, as I believe it and the Honda Sensing Suite are standard on all models.
 

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I had a 20k a year commute.

Advantages I expected with the Volt.
  • Minimal gas use (since I had free charging at work)
  • Quiet and SMOOOOTH operation

Advantages I didn't expect with the Volt, but turned out to be true,
  • Vastly reduced number of oil changes
  • Vastly reduced break wear
  • Vastly reduced (as in almost none) maintenance costs
  • Car is a "mountain goat*", climbs powerfully and is super controlled (driving in "L") on the way back down

*Note on "Mountain Goat" comment, I drive through and over the Blue Ridge mountains and West Virginia all the time so I'm talking 3,000 ft elevation changes in a very short distance aka 13% or more grades

Disadvantages with the Volt
  • Heavy car, so it's kinda hard on the tires (especially with all the twisty mountain roads I've been driving lately)
  • Gen 1 stock headlights ABSOLUTELY SUCK (no idea about Gen 2).
  • Super easy to speed (I'm being serious here... the car drives so smoothly it's stupidly easy to go too fast without realizing it.)
 

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I drive at least 30k a year on several of my cars each a year, plus an rv.

Have you considered a used ELR? I came to the volt from a vw jsw tdi at 210,000 miles in 4 years. The ELR is above and beyond them the only thing i miss is the extra room and the hatch.

Still gets very good fuel economy and lots are coming off lease with lots of warranty left for ~$25k

Can't beat a phev at ~100 miles a day. You'll always get way better mileage. It takes a LOT of highway miles before a diesel starts being better, and most car diesels have a lot of very very expensive maintenance creep in, DMF fuel pumps, timing. Not nearly as bad on a PHEV.
 

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The fuel consumption of the Volt and the Cruze Diesel (Manual Hatchback is rated 48 MPG highway) will be about break even on your commute. Electricity is cheaper than either 87 octane or diesel fuel and currently 87 octane is cheaper than diesel. Pop over to CruzeTalk.com and look in the Gen 2 Diesel section to get a feel for the types of issues and how members there like their Cruze Diesels (hint - very few issues and a lot of happiness).

The one area the Cruze Hatchback will outperform the Volt is cargo space - it was actually on my shortlist when my Cruze ECO MT was totaled by hail simply because of the cargo space.

Finally, go test drive both and price them based on the features you want. Don't forget to subtract your estimated tax bill or $7,500, whichever is lower, from the Volt's sticker price.
 

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You know, to be perfectly honest, I think it's comes down to personal preference.

I've always considered that if my wife suddenly needed a new vehicle to replace her 2014 Cruze Diesel, she'd be getting a Cruze Hatch Diesel. But the 2019 MCA deletes leather entirely (only offering leatherette, which I detest as a full seating surface, no matter how "close" it may be - it is not genuine), and the current Cruze Diesel hatch doesn't even offer Express-up on the window switch - something I've grown used to in the 2014, as well as my Volt. At this point, I might heavily consider a second Volt - though having to charge two cars might be too cumbersome.

The Cruze Diesel Hatch will probably see over 50mpg regularly on the freeway, and ours does great in the city too (the car averages mid-high-30s while driving about 95% city in the summer, with my wife's leadfoot - far from the EPA estimate of 27mpg city).

The Volt will return high-40s on the freeway if you behave yourself and watch your speed. My friend recently took a trip with his, with his girlfriend and her two kids, with the hatch packed, and the AC blowing cold, and averaged right around 48mpg on the freeway - because he kept the cruise set at 70mph.

That said - city MPG means nothing when you compare it with something that doesn't even have to use fuel. I drive around 35 miles a day, and have not filled up since January.

The Volt, having such a low CG, really makes for a fun car to drive - and yet it rides so well because it is softly sprung due to said low-CG. Really the best of both worlds there.
 

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That's a lot of miles. highway miles are where a traditional ICE car shines. I'd go with the cruise disel if I were you.

That said, why not get two cars? Small commuter during the week to put a ton of miles on and a full car for the weekend? You can get a base Ford fiesta for 11k. Fun to drive car, 40mpg highway on regular gas. 15k for a well equipped one with carplay/Android for nav. Put the savings toward a fun unpractical car like a used Miata or something with cargo capacity when you need something larger.
 

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Putting aside money, there's the "how many EV miles do I get today?" game I play on every commute with my Volt since I usually go beyond EV range. You can't play this game on any other car, except some other PHEVs--but with their measly EV ranges it's really no fun.

Yeah, I know, it's not everyone's thing. But driving a lot can be grueling and, for me, it makes the experience more interesting and challenging. I like to try to maximize my range, improve my skills at using as little friction brakes as possible, find the most efficient routes and driving styles. Heck, I still enjoy it, and have been playing the game for quite a few years now. Can't really do it in any other car.
 

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That said, why not get two cars? Small commuter during the week to put a ton of miles on and a full car for the weekend? You can get a base Ford fiesta for 11k. Fun to drive car, 40mpg highway on regular gas. 15k for a well equipped one with carplay/Android for nav. Put the savings toward a fun unpractical car like a used Miata or something with cargo capacity when you need something larger.
No!!!
If you're driving that much, if anything you'd want to spend more.
You are putting a large chunk of your life into that commute (unfortunately). You want to make it as comfortable and easy as it can be.
You might save a bit on the car but you lose out on all the comforts and things that make your life easier (e.g. ACC as mentioned above)

Pick the car you want, that's the most comfortable for long drives, and will make your commute as easy as possible. You're going to be in it a long time.
If your commute involves any stop-and-go sections, the volt wins hands-down. L and regen make that kind of traffic a breeze.
And if ACC can handle it, even better.
 

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I commute 15,680 miles a year and burn 60 gallons of gas for my commute, not including an occasional “fun” 3700 mile trip.
 
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