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I did a bit of research at the dealership. Where the 3.6 KWh charger lists for $800 Canadian the 7.2 kWh charger was listed at $2600. The dealer was shocked at that price. The part will physically fit and they would just need to flash the software from what they could see. All could be done. Install would be pretty big job from what he knew on the location and the software upgrade might be tricky as the software updates based on the VIN. Hope that helps some out.
 

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I think you need the Premier model for 7.2KW charging
 

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I think you need the Premier model for 7.2KW charging
Correct, but I think this thread is about trying to retrofit this to a Volt that did not come with it.
 

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Personally I find this tread a little absurd. Nothing these days is absolutely impossible, but that doesn't make it reasonable. It's like saying I married the wrong individual. Maybe with enough plastic surgery and some CRISPR editing I can get to like them.
 

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JRRF - you have no sense of adventure in this specific area. :) There are a lot of questions on how complicated it would be, and a lot of the answers we have so far are guesses. For many people a large part of the enjoyment with a vehicle is doing some changes.

For some, those changes are tint and wheels. For some more technically inclined people, modification questions like this are a great mental exercise, even if they don't attempt it. Volts in general draw a subset of owners that are interested in the technical possibilities, much more so than the environmental interest. That leads to questions of understanding the system like this one. Much like the OpenPilot efforts, it doesn't have to be for everyone.
 

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JRRF - you have no sense of adventure in this specific area.
There are a lot of questions on how complicated it would be, and a lot of the answers we have so far are guesses. For many people a large part of the enjoyment with a vehicle is doing some changes.

For some, those changes are tint and wheels. For some more technically inclined people, modification questions like this are a great mental exercise, even if they don't attempt it. Volts in general draw a subset of owners that are interested in the technical possibilities, much more so than the environmental interest. That leads to questions of understanding the system like this one. Much like the OpenPilot efforts, it doesn't have to be for everyone.
Oh I grew up in the age of massive car modifications. But it was easy back then. I still have all my tools too. But modifying a high voltage component of the Volt along with the software still seems really out there to me. Maybe I'm just too old. Then again, CRISPR is a real adventure too 😀
 

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Doing an upgrade like that for experimentation sake is one thing (big down sides) but doesn't really make sense dollar wise to get higher charge rate even if successful at an L2 at your local shopping mall or cut the charge time from 4 hours to 2 hours overnight especially when you have the gas alternative (if you aren't too obsessed). If you want to tinker, fine, I can see that but better to tinker on a collector car making upgrades (like putting a twin turbo 700 hp LS6 in a TR7 like a friend did) than getting an obscure advantage that won't really make any difference anyway. But it's your money and you can spend it any way you want (assuming your wife says you can).:p
 

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Doing an upgrade like that for experimentation sake is one thing (big down sides) but doesn't really make sense dollar wise to get higher charge rate even if successful at an L2 at your local shopping mall or cut the charge time from 4 hours to 2 hours overnight especially when you have the gas alternative (if you aren't too obsessed). If you want to tinker, fine, I can see that but better to tinker on a collector car making upgrades (like putting a twin turbo 700 hp LS6 in a TR7 like a friend did) than getting an obscure advantage that won't really make any difference anyway. But it's your money and you can spend it any way you want (assuming your wife says you can).
You can only do so much damage trying to bolt a new engine in a car. Messing with high voltage that's computer controlled is an entirely different animal.

Even Chevy doesn't let just any mechanic touch a Volt without specialized training.
 

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I think you need the Premier model for 7.2KW charging
It is standard with the Premier, and optional on the LT. It would be interesting to see if the wiring, contactor, and so on have the same part numbers as the 3.6 kW charging cars.

Funny thing - for the first three years we had our Volt, 7.2 kW charging would have been very useful to us. Reason being that my wife only got a 2 hour time slot of free charging at her workplace. So it was only enough time to handle one-way of her commute. With 7.2 charging, she wouldn't have needed to charge at home at all - except on weekends. Recently her commute swelled to 60 miles and no workplace charging. Now she burns a couple tenths of a gallon of gas every day. Overnight charging at 3.6 vs 7.2 wouldn't make any difference at all.
 

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I think you need the Premier model for 7.2KW charging
It is standard with the Premier, and optional on the LT. It would be interesting to see if the wiring, contactor, and so on have the same part numbers as the 3.6 kW charging cars.



Funny thing - for the first three years we had our Volt, 7.2 kW charging would have been very useful to us. Reason being that my wife only got a 2 hour time slot of free charging at her workplace. So it was only enough time to handle one-way of her commute. With 7.2 charging, she wouldn't have needed to charge at home at all - except on weekends. Recently her commute swelled to 60 miles and no workplace charging. Now she burns a couple tenths of a gallon of gas every day. Overnight charging at 3.6 vs 7.2 wouldn't make any difference at all.
It makes a difference if you only have 2-3 hours to charge, before you need to leave again.
Thankfully, mine has the higher output charger.
 

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The charge rate makes difference on Chargepoint. My charger at work, although Gen2 volt rate is 3.6KWH, the charge point charger is only delivering 3.3KWH. Since they charge by time, ChargerPoint makes out. 7.2KWH would reduce my cost in half.
 

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The charge rate makes difference on Chargepoint. My charger at work, although Gen2 volt rate is 3.6KWH, the charge point charger is only delivering 3.3KWH. Since they charge by time, ChargerPoint makes out. 7.2KWH would reduce my cost in half.
Most commercial level 2 charging stations use 3-phase commercial power; the available voltage is usually rated at 208V. ~3.1kW effectively power available to charge is typical. Even vehicles with 7.2kW to 9.6kW charging capabilities are limited to just ~6.2kW at these locations.
 

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The charge rate makes difference on Chargepoint. My charger at work, although Gen2 volt rate is 3.6KWH, the charge point charger is only delivering 3.3KWH. Since they charge by time, ChargerPoint makes out. 7.2KWH would reduce my cost in half.
Most commercial level 2 charging stations use 3-phase commercial power; the available voltage is usually rated at 208V. ~3.1kW effectively power available to charge is typical. Even vehicles with 7.2kW to 9.6kW charging capabilities are limited to just ~6.2kW at these locations.
I’ve only ever used a commercial charging station once, & it was a Blink.
It did state on the screen, that it was 240 volt capable.
 

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I’ve only ever used a commercial charging station once, & it was a Blink.
It did state on the screen, that it was 240 volt capable.
Which screen, the Blink charging station's screen or the Volt's energy information screen? One way to know whether you are charging at ~3kW versus ~3.6kW (or 6kW versus 7.2kW) is how many miles of EV range you recover per hour of charging. At home (3.6kW) I see 12 miles of EV range per hour of charging. At a commercial charging station (3.1kW) I see just ~10.5 miles of EV range per hour of charging. The difference between 240V and 208V is 13.4%, that is also how much longer it will take to fully charge the Volt at 208V versus 240V.

Using the maximum of 7.2kW charging rate of the 2019 Volt Premier charging at this rate will add ~1kW to the battery in ~10 minutes. At the 3.6kW charging limit of all other Gen 2 Volt vehicles, except for the 2019 Volt Premier and 2019 Volt LT with the optional 7.2kW on-board charger (Gen 1 Volt is limited to 3.3kW) adding ~1kW takes ~20 minutes.

A full charge at 7.2kW rate takes ~2hrs, 20 minutes (140 minutes); Using a commercial 208V power source it would take ~2hrs, 40 minutes (160 minutes)

A full charge at the 3.6 kW rate takes ~4hrs, 40 minutes (280 minutes); Using a commercial 208V power source it would ~5hrs, 20 minutes (~320 minutes).

All times are approximate.
 

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I’ve only ever used a commercial charging station once, & it was a Blink.
It did state on the screen, that it was 240 volt capable.
Which screen, the Blink charging station's screen or the Volt's energy information screen? One way to know whether you are charging at ~3kW versus ~3.6kW (or 6kW versus 7.2kW) is how many miles of EV range you recover per hour of charging. At home (3.6kW) I see 12 miles of EV range per hour of charging. At a commercial charging station (3.1kW) I see just ~10.5 miles of EV range per hour of charging. The difference between 240V and 208V is 13.4%, that is also how much longer it will take to fully charge the Volt at 208V versus 240V.

Using the maximum of 7.2kW charging rate of the 2019 Volt Premier charging at this rate will add ~1kW to the battery in ~10 minutes. At the 3.6kW charging limit of all other Gen 2 Volt vehicles, except for the 2019 Volt Premier and 2019 Volt LT with the optional 7.2kW on-board charger (Gen 1 Volt is limited to 3.3kW) adding ~1kW takes ~20 minutes.

A full charge at 7.2kW rate takes ~2hrs, 20 minutes (140 minutes); Using a commercial 208V power source it would take ~2hrs, 40 minutes (160 minutes)

A full charge at the 3.6 kW rate takes ~4hrs, 40 minutes (280 minutes); Using a commercial 208V power source it would ~5hrs, 20 minutes (~320 minutes).

All times are approximate.
It was on the Blink charging station screen.
I can check it out for exact wording, the next time I go by there & have a few minutes.
I just know that I specifically read the words, looking for the details:
Is it 240 volts?
Is it 208 volts?
How many amps? -by the way, I think it said it was capable of giving 40 or 50 amps.

I don’t think my volt screen even uses the word “capable”.
 

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The chargepoint APP on my phone shows the KWH rate charge. It is this APP that only shows about 3.3KWh not the 3.6KWH. The J1772 negotiates the current level of charge capability through the pilot signal resistance frequency. I suspect the chargepoint charger only has 2 delivery modes, 6.6KW or 3.3KW, no 3.6KW. on my previous Gen1 Volt, chargepoint delivered 3.3KW so the 208v or 240v should not be factored in, just current delivery.
 

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It was on the Blink charging station screen.
I can check it out for exact wording, the next time I go by there & have a few minutes.
I just know that I specifically read the words, looking for the details:
Is it 240 volts?
Is it 208 volts?
How many amps? -by the way, I think it said it was capable of giving 40 or 50 amps.

I don’t think my volt screen even uses the word “capable”.
You would be able to charge at 240V from a home Level 2 charging setup. Most commercial installations in the US are provided with 3-phase power not the split-phase power used in the home; in a commercial application the voltage for Level 2 charging is 208V.
The maximum amperage is limited by the circuit breaker and the lower number of either the EVSE or by the vehicle that is being charged. The charging station may be capable of supplying 40 or more amps but the Volt is limited to no more than 16 amps (32 amps for the 2019 Volt with the optional 7.2kW charger.) Doing the math: 208V X 16 amps = 3328W (3.3kW)
 

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One way to know a sites capabilities is look at its plugshare listing. Often times people will leave a comment on the voltage and amperage they are able to pull. For example on Teslas, there is a direct display of both voltage and amperage on the charging screen. Whenever I charge at a public charging site, I always try to remember to do a plugshare check-in and provide the information.

While it doesn't matter for Volts, it is even nice to know if a 120v receptacle is a 5-15 or a 5-20 - as some cars can take advantage of the extra amperage capability of a 5-20.
 
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