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Does anyone know if there is any difference between adaptive cruise control on a 2018 Volt, and advanced adaptive cruise control on a 2019?
 

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There is no mention of "Advanced" in the 2019 Volt Literature or Owners Manual. "Adaptive Cruise Control" in the only Title being
used.
 

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Does anyone know if there is any difference between adaptive cruise control on a 2018 Volt, and advanced adaptive cruise control on a 2019?
Yes. The 2019 Volt when equipped with adaptive cruise control can also be driven using conventional (non-radar sensing) cruise control. Reasons for using conventional cruise control when the vehicle is equipped with ACC include inclement weather. Rain and mist conditions can interfere with the radar unit sending and receiving functions. Being able to revert to conventional cruise control in these driving situations conditions may be helpful.
 

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Yes. The 2019 Volt when equipped with adaptive cruise control can also be driven using conventional (non-radar sensing) cruise control. Reasons for using conventional cruise control when the vehicle is equipped with ACC include inclement weather. Rain and mist conditions can interfere with the radar unit sending and receiving functions. Being able to revert to conventional cruise control in these driving situations conditions may be helpful.
Honestly, I get worried when manufacturers give both options on the same car, especially if it's easy to switch between them. There are some Infintis where they have two buttons side by side, one for adaptive cruise and one for blind cruise. The odds of an accident caused by mode confusion (thinking the car was in adaptive cruise when it's not,) seem dangerously high.
 

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Yes. The 2019 Volt when equipped with adaptive cruise control can also be driven using conventional (non-radar sensing) cruise control. Reasons for using conventional cruise control when the vehicle is equipped with ACC include inclement weather. Rain and mist conditions can interfere with the radar unit sending and receiving functions. Being able to revert to conventional cruise control in these driving situations conditions may be helpful.
Frankly this is something the adaptive cruise control in my 2017 handles very well. I've driven in all types of conditions (except snow), and ACC has handled it very well given this tropical climate. I've never wished for just an old cruise control option.
 

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The very driving conditions where you might want to use conventional cruise control instead of ACC are noted in the owner's manual as when to not use ACC. The risks of using ACC in bad weather driving may include reduced sensor range and slowing, stopping too abruptly causing loss of control on slick roads. In rare instances where you are on a long road trip in bad weather with hours of driving ahead of you then using conventional cruise control, where traffic is not an issue, would be helpful.
 

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Sounds like a useful idea, but if I were experiencing bad weather, I kind of want full car control, and probably wouldn't be fooling with cruise, adaptive or not.
 

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This was my point, ACC performed extremely well in poor conditions to my surprise. We get torrential rain here, and the system works exceptionally well. I have the following distance set to the max which provides a safety buffer 'just in case' however the system just works very well for me. For those conditions which I wouldn't want to use ACC, I wouldn't want to use standard cruise control either.
 

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There is no mention of "Advanced" in the 2019 Volt Literature or Owners Manual. "Adaptive Cruise Control" in the only Title being
used.
Not so regarding the literature (although the manual indeed does not differentiate the two). When you build a 2019 Volt on Chevrolet.com there is an interior option choice of "
Adaptive Cruise Control - Advanced." This is option KSG. It shows up as this description on the sticker of our new 2019 Volt as "Advanced Cruise Control - Advanced," whereas for the 2017 is showed up as "Adaptive Cruise Control with Full Speed Automatic Breaking."

Comparing the performance of the two options, they are very different. The 2019 advanced version is much smoother overall. Deceleration when approaching a vehicle is more gradual and less jerky, and speed ups smoother.

So there is an actual real difference in the options.
 

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Sounds like a useful idea, but if I were experiencing bad weather, I kind of want full car control, and probably wouldn't be fooling with cruise, adaptive or not.
Using Adaptive Cruise Control (Advanced or not) in no way takes away the ability of the driver to fully control the car. It is a safety feature in bad weather as it can respond more quickly than a driver, especially if the driver is even momentarily distracted.

I look at the adaptive cruise control as another safety feature (which also offers convenience) and continue to drive the same as if it were not there relative to controlling the vehicle and monitoring traffic. It's a tool, just like lane change indicators, to make driving safer.
 

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Using Adaptive Cruise Control (Advanced or not) in no way takes away the ability of the driver to fully control the car. It is a safety feature in bad weather as it can respond more quickly than a driver, especially if the driver is even momentarily distracted.

I look at the adaptive cruise control as another safety feature (which also offers convenience) and continue to drive the same as if it were not there relative to controlling the vehicle and monitoring traffic. It's a tool, just like lane change indicators, to make driving safer.
The 2017 Volt Owner's Manual, page 197, states:

Do not use ACC when:

1) On winding and hilly roads or when sensors are blocked by snow, ice or dirt. The system may not detect a vehicle ahead. Keep the entire front of the vehicle clean.

2) Visibility is low, such as in fog, rain or snow conditions. ACC performance is limited under these conditions.

3) On slippery roads where fast changes in tire traction can cause excessive wheel slip.

Also, on page 196 the 2017 Volt Owner's Manual states:

If ACC is controlling your vehicle when the Traction Control System (TCS) or the Stabilitrak system activates, the ACC may automatically disengage. When road conditions allow ACC to be safely used, the ACC can be turned back on. ACC will not engage if the TCS or Stabilitrak system is disabled.
 

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This was my point, ACC performed extremely well in poor conditions to my surprise. We get torrential rain here, and the system works exceptionally well.
torrential rain perhaps, but in the PNW drizzle it'll often "give up" for me. Sensors are clean, verified in service no problems, etc, it's the delight of our style of rain.
 

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torrential rain perhaps, but in the PNW drizzle it'll often "give up" for me. Sensors are clean, verified in service no problems, etc, it's the delight of our style of rain.
That PNW drizzle is precisely the type of bad weather driving condition that interferes with the ACC radar. It is probably the size of the droplets that effectively reflects or absorbs the radar signal. So the 2019 Volt when equipped with advanced ACC can soldier on if you choose to use conventional cruise control.
 

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That's the problem with "safety" features, when they are turned off, not working, disabled, etc. one expects them to work either because of habit, you forgot you turned them off or didn't realize they weren't working and presto change-o, you're in an accident.
 

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All good info. BTW, ACC is neat as heck! I played with it today on our less than a week old '19 in busy traffic and it's amazing how it follows and slows, even to a stop, and then resumes after stopping with a tap on the accelerator. Well worth the price

Sent from my XT1635-01 using Tapatalk
 

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It will also resume on its own, if you don’t come to a complete stop or a with push on the Resume/+ steering wheel button .... I find this easier than tapping the accelerator
 

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I don't know if ACC on the 2019 Volt is better than the 2018, but it's very good. I've had an Infiniti FX50, Cadillac ELR, Tesla Model X, and Cadillac CT6 PHEV with Adaptive Cruise, and the Volt is second on that list (only because Tesla's AutoPilot can't be beat). The CT6 was the absolute worst on the list, as its system barely functioned properly. The FX50 and ELR were good, but they were 2010/2014 tech respectively, and had some small flaws.

Driving the Volt with ACC, I am 100% confident in its ability to handle normal driving situations, and 90% sure it can handle unusual ones. I've tested it out extensively since getting the car, and at this point I probably drive with ACC on more than I do manually.

Still need to pay attention and be ready for surprises (and remember to stop at lights and signs if no one is in front of you), but the ACC dials down the annoyance of driving significantly. While not at the level of a Tesla, it still feels like a Disney ride in the Volt during my commute - safe, predictable, and reliable.
 

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Frankly this is something the adaptive cruise control in my 2017 handles very well. I've driven in all types of conditions (except snow), and ACC has handled it very well given this tropical climate. I've never wished for just an old cruise control option.
The ACC doesn't engage in very thick fog conditions. And I thought RADAR technology can see through the fog, but it is the Volt's camera that is the one preventing it from engaging in case of the thick fog.
 

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Yes. The 2019 Volt when equipped with adaptive cruise control can also be driven using conventional (non-radar sensing) cruise control. Reasons for using conventional cruise control when the vehicle is equipped with ACC include inclement weather. Rain and mist conditions can interfere with the radar unit sending and receiving functions. Being able to revert to conventional cruise control in these driving situations conditions may be helpful.
The very driving conditions where you might want to use conventional cruise control instead of ACC are noted in the owner's manual as when to not use ACC. The risks of using ACC in bad weather driving may include reduced sensor range and slowing, stopping too abruptly causing loss of control on slick roads. In rare instances where you are on a long road trip in bad weather with hours of driving ahead of you then using conventional cruise control, where traffic is not an issue, would be helpful.
I can think of no situation where standard cruise is necessary if you have Adaptive Cruise. Frankly I think it's dangerous to have both controls available. Either your mindset is that this function is going to intervene, or it's not. Switching your head back and forth is looking for trouble.

Older systems were notorious for disabling in rainy conditions, but not so much with the newer LIDAR systems. As for the Chevy implementation, I've found that it only disengages in the heaviest downpours, when you need to have your feet on the pedals, both hands on the wheel, and your eyes glued to whatever you might be able to see.
 
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