GM Volt Forum banner
21 - 29 of 29 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,011 Posts
Oregon is a different animal, unto itself. Oregon does what Oregon does. What it isn't is, a "CARB state", with regard to electric vehicles, or at least not the Volt in 2012, or any other vehicles I've seen. Your #4 warranty excludes your car from that. Only non-"CARB state" vehicles show the Federal emission requirement/warranty, while your "Emisson" additional warranties are also very different (similar titles, different coverage periods), and you aren't showing a "PZEV Emission Limited Warranty", whether Oregon requires it or not. All of the late model vehicles I've purchased have been "California Emissions" vehicles, and none of them ever listed "Federal Emissions". This to include all my 1985 to 2014 GM Diesels, and a half dozen passenger cars along the way, including the 2017 Volt. The same should likely apply to all "CARB state" vehicles since M/Y 2011, although I can't confirm that, not having seen them all.
Let me clarify my posting. The warranty page of ANY Volt should list the original GM manufacturer’s warranties, even if they are now expired, and regardless of where that Volt is currently registered for use. Additional warranties provided by the manufacturer, such as CARB-mandated warranties, might also be listed there.

In my list of manufacturer’s warranties, #4 is listed in the Volt warranty manual as a Federal Emissions Components warranty. All vehicles are required to follow Federal emissions standards. Some are required to follow the more strict CARB standards. The warranty covers the components, not the standards to be followed. Thus the original manufacturer’s warranty refers to the coverage of components that provide the emissions control required of all vehicles.

Perhaps it would be clearer to present the list of 5 manufacturer’s warranties as described on my Volt warranty page, rather than as how they are listed in the GM warranty booklet:

1. Bumper to Bumper Limited Warranty (3 years/36,000 miles)
2. Powertrain Limited Warranty (5 years/100,000 miles)
3. Corrosion Limited Warranty (6 years/100,000 miles)
4. Emission Select Component Ltd Wty (8 years/80,000 miles)
5. Voltec Component Limited Warranty (8 years/100,000 miles)

Oregon is not a different animal unto itself.

Under Section 177 of the U.S. Clean Air Act, states that choose to require more stringent emission limits than the federal standards for new vehicles can only adopt California’s vehicle emission standards. As of 2018, Oregon was one of thirteen "Section 177" states that have opted-in to California’s low emission vehicle standards. That number may have changed since that date.

However, adopting the CARB standards on emissions does not also require adopting the CARB warranty requirements. Not all CARB-compliant states have laws that require the manufacturer to provide the CARB level warranties. Some do, with modification in that state’s laws.

Oregon DEQ Regulations posted in 2017 say that all Volts registered in Oregon must be provided by the manufacturer with a warranty that complies with CARB requirements, except that the 15 year/150,000 mile PZEV warranty is NOT required for PZEV Volts. However, the 10 year/150,000 coverage of the battery in a PZEV-class vehicle IS required.

It would seem that the "warranty that complies with CARB requirements" includes the two warranties listed on my 2012 Volt’s warranty page, but I would not expect to see PZEV-class-related warranties (the language of which includes the 10 year battery coverage) on my ULEV class warranty page:

What my Volt warranty page lists in addition to the 5 GM manufacturer’s warranties:
6. Emission Limited Warranty (expired in 2015 for this 2012 Volt/50,000 miles)
7. Emission Select State Component Ltd Wty (expired in 2019 for this 2012 Volt/70,000 miles)

What the warranty manual says regarding a 3 year/50,000 mile and a 7 year/70,000 mile warranty:

California Emission Defect and Emission Performance Warranty Coverage:
For cars and trucks with light duty or medium duty emissions:
-For 3 years or 50,000 miles: If any emission-related part on your vehicle is defective, GM will repair or replace it. This is your Short-term Emission Control Systems Defects Warranty.

California Emission Defect and Emission Performance Warranty Coverage:
For cars and trucks with light duty or medium duty emissions:
-For 7 years or 70,000 miles, whichever comes first: If an emission-related part listed in this booklet specially noted with coverage for 7 years or 70,000 miles is defective, GM will repair or replace it. This is your Long-term Emission Control Systems Defects Warranty.


My point is that the Volt warranty page should present a list of the 5 GM warranties that came with the purchase of the car, plus any warranties that GM is also obligated to provide.

If your Volt is registered in California or in a "Section 177" state where the state laws also require the CARB warranty coverage, those CARB warranties should be listed separately on the page. They are not mere "revisions" to the original manufacturer’s warranties.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
Let me clarify my posting. The warranty page of ANY Volt should list the original GM manufacturer’s warranties, even if they are now expired, and regardless of where that Volt is currently registered for use. Additional warranties provided by the manufacturer, such as CARB-mandated warranties, might also be listed there.
"CARB" is not an emission standard, it is merely California's commission that originates policy. The proper term for the emission requirement is "California Emissions". My warranty contracts with each vehicle listed this, and NOT the "Federal Emissions". "California Emissions" is different, and separate, from Federal Emissions, and most GM vehicles built and sold in CA are unique to CA. I have no "Federal Emissions", warranty or equipment to be covered, by definition, and no "Federal Emissions Warranty" in any of my documentation. As I said, the same is of my prior CA emissions vehicles. You may be correct about some of the other CARB-clone states and warranties, but not in this instance. I am in CA, and buy CA vehicles. I have for decades, since long before there was CARB. "California Emissions" has been the same. The Volt was also available w/o the "special" emissions class, and was specifically denoted by CARB in all the rebate applications. It clearly stated that any EV that falls into the special policy must have the unique designation. The Volt was available in CA, with CA Emissions, but without the special policy requirements. Simply, you cannot buy a passenger vehicle in CA without CA Emissions. You can import most used vehicles (at a price), but none can be sold new without it. Many products are unique to CA. The most populous state is the tail wagging the dog.

At any rate, the OP is in Canada, but he bought a car that originated in CA, and has questions related to CA warranties. His warranty declarations should appear like mine. Yours will differ. Your "Emission Select State" warranty is not the same. Its RPO code is not the same. Its language is not the same. Its coverage period (and perhaps covered equipment) is not the same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,011 Posts
You seem to be saying your Volt warranty page does not list the following GM warranty:

Emission Select Component Ltd Wty (8 years/80,000 miles)

You do raise a good point because of the confusing nature of the language in the Volt warranty booklet concerning eligibility for the "emission warranty that GM provides for your vehicle in accordance with the California Air Resources Board ." The booklet says:

This warranty applies if your vehicle meets both of the following requirements:
  • Your vehicle is registered in California or other states adopting California emission and warranty regulations.
  • Your vehicle is certified for sale in California as indicated on the vehicle's emission control information label.

If the Volt was available for sale in California as a new car both with and without the "special" emissions class identification, how could an owner determine if that Volt was eligible for the special policy?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
123 Posts
You seem to be saying your Volt warranty page does not list the following GM warranty:

Emission Select Component Ltd Wty (8 years/80,000 miles)

You do raise a good point because of the confusing nature of the language in the Volt warranty booklet concerning eligibility for the "emission warranty that GM provides for your vehicle in accordance with the California Air Resources Board ." The booklet says:

This warranty applies if your vehicle meets both of the following requirements:
  • Your vehicle is registered in California or other states adopting California emission and warranty regulations.
  • Your vehicle is certified for sale in California as indicated on the vehicle's emission control information label.

If the Volt was available for sale in California as a new car both with and without the "special" emissions class identification, how could an owner determine if that Volt was eligible for the special policy?
That's what I'm saying. Confusing nature, indeed. There are (at least) 2 GM factory warranty classes for most GM passenger vehicles. This is not unique to the Volt, but all GM passenger models. There is no "Federal Emissions" on CA Emission vehicles, either in print, or physically. Oregon's and the select other states' PZEV warranties are appends to the Federal Emissions warranties, while "California Emissions" replaces it. This is a contractual requirement between CA and GM (and all other motor vehicle manufacturers), which allows GM to ship vehicles into CA. The process is, likely, more cost effective for other states to simply clone the requirements of CA Emissions, without calling it "California Emissions". In CA, "California Emissions" is an equipment requirement, but the warranty language specifies "Select States", which only simplifies the language, universally. And the special policy CA Emissions class that makes the Volt eligible for CA rebates, as well as (green?) HOV stickers or other special perks, is the VIN. It also has a unique RPO code, and it's noted on the window sticker. I don't recall which digit, but without it, the vehicle doesn't qualify for the rebates or the special HOV sticker. I don't need/want the HOV sticker, so never looked too deep into it, but the language was clear at the time.

The attached pic is the entirety of my warranty page. My paper warranty documentation doesn't show what isn't listed here. Note that the "Emission Limited Warranty", or any other, doesn't state "California", but shows the effective periods. Previous GM model's warranty pages did indicate "California", but I don't know when they changed the language. I just looked up the warranty page for my 2001 GMC, and what previously said "California Emissions Ltd Wty", now says "Emission Select State Component Limited Warranty" (expired, of course). Also, it does not have any reference to a "Federal Emissions" equipment or warranty, and the same is of all of my previous vehicles since. Another thing to note is, any GM vehicle you've ever registered on the site is still accessible, even if you no longer own them, at least in my case. If you think all this PZEV warranty stuff is confusing, have a look at the warranty pages of a CA emissions Diesel. I've had/have a few. I'm now curious to see what BEV warranty pages show.

172793
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
And then to be extra confusing, key parts of one or both of those 15 year warranties are actually only honored for 10 years :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Let's see if I can lessen the warranty confusion. Of course, this information only applies to the U.S., and I'm going to be specific to the 2013 model year. The details of this story changed in subsequent years.

There are two different warranties at play: the manufacturer's warranty on the mechanics of the car, and an emissions warranty that's required by the government. The purpose of the emissions warranty is to ensure that the parts needed for pollution control remain in good repair. The long-term warranty on the Voltec system is the emissions warranty.

Under Federal Law, each state can elect one of two emissions warranty regimes: Federal standards, or the California standard. Note that this is different than the California emissions standard. While a few more states adopted the California emissions warranty standard subsequently, in 2013 Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington had California Emissions Warranty coverage.

There were two variants of the 2013 Volt. The "Enhanced AT-PZEV" version required the PCV Low Emissions Package, as indicated on the vehicle sticker. It was also coded in the VIN. In 2013, GM would sell this version into only two states: California and New York. (No special orders.) New York had adopted the California emissions standard, but the Federal emissions warranty standard. (They adopted the California warranty in a later year.) So, New Yorkers got a mixed bag: their Volts qualified for the carpool lane, but not the longer warranty.

The California emissions warranty requires longer coverage for certain components of a vehicle certified as being Enhanced AT-PZEV. However, in order to qualify for that coverage, you need three things: (1) The correct hardware, the installation of option PCV, (2) Certification on the sticker of California emissions, option YF5, and (3) Registration of the car in a state that has adopted the California emissions warranty regime. Even though GM sold cars with option PCV into New York, they did not use emissions certification code YF5. For New Yorkers it didn't matter—they had the Federal emissions warranty. However, it would do you no good to buy such a car in New York and then register it in neighboring states, such as New Jersey or Connecticut, for lack of the certification. (You could, however, factory order a Volt with PCV and YF5 for delivery in New York if you also specified the NB9 emissions override option. That's what I did.)

So, if you happen to have a 2013 Volt that was originally sold into California (with both the PCV and YF5 options), if you register it in a state that had adopted the California emissions warranty standard for the 2013 model year, you get the longer warranty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,011 Posts
Let's see if I can lessen the warranty confusion. Of course, this information only applies to the U.S., and I'm going to be specific to the 2013 model year. The details of this story changed in subsequent years.

There are two different warranties at play: the manufacturer's warranty on the mechanics of the car, and an emissions warranty that's required by the government. The purpose of the emissions warranty is to ensure that the parts needed for pollution control remain in good repair. The long-term warranty on the Voltec system is the emissions warranty.

Under Federal Law, each state can elect one of two emissions warranty regimes: Federal standards, or the California standard. Note that this is different than the California emissions standard. While a few more states adopted the California emissions warranty standard subsequently, in 2013 Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington had California Emissions Warranty coverage.
...
Your posting is helpful and informative. Let me add a few thoughts regarding emissions-related warranties.

My understanding is that an emissions-related warranty protects the owner against defects in material and workmanship of the emissions-related components. The warranty would NOT provide protection against failure of the parts to provide the level of control required by a specific set of emission regulations unless that failure was caused by a defect in the part itself.

In this sense, warranty coverage itself covers the parts, not the task the parts are being required to do by the laws of the state in which the vehicle is registered (i.e., meet Federal vs California Emissions standards). Your state’s choice of Federal vs California Emissions standards establishes a minimum level of emissions control the equipment must provide before the vehicle is allowed to be registered and operate in the state. Warranties then cover the parts needed to control the emissions at that level or better.

The regulations may then create a number of increasingly strict emission tiers, and vehicles are certified as a certain class of vehicle based on how well the equipment is able to limit the emissions. States desiring to encourage the preservation of the environment may offer incentive to buyers of vehicles certified to produce emissions at lower and lower levels (via rebates or discounts, or perks such as HOV stickers). California regulations are stricter than Federal regulations, and this has encouraged states to promote their own environmental goals by enacting state laws requiring adherence to the California standards (which then enables the state to offer similar perks to those who buy environment-friendly vehicles). Better control over emissions often requires the use of more expensive parts and/or more expensive part installation costs. The vehicles that qualify for the "perks" are often the vehicles with the higher sticker prices.

An agency that created the emission control standards also has an interest in promoting the longevity of the equipment used to provide the vehicle with lower and lower emission levels. The California regulations mandate that vehicle manufacturers provide certain emission warranty coverages for their vehicles. Emissions component warranties that apply to vehicles equipped with parts that maintain higher levels of control over emissions provide better warranty coverage.

I also would note that providing a car with electric propulsion capabilities contributes to the vehicle’s overall ability to limit emissions. The Volt’s "Voltec " components are therefore included in emission component warranty coverage.

The GM New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverage for my 2012 Volt included two "emissions" related warranties, the Emission Select Component Ltd Wty (8 years/80,000 miles) and the Voltec Component Limited Warranty (8 years/100,000 miles). Providing two warranties highlights this distinction: all of the components covered by both warranties are included in the Emission Warranty Parts List section of the warranty book, but the "emissions control components" are covered by warranty for 80,000 miles, whereas the parts associated with the "Voltec," or electric propulsion system portion of the emissions control parts, are covered for 100,000 miles.

I note that over the years, the use of "Voltec" has diminished in GM warranty coverage use to be replaced by references to the vehicle’s Hybrid system. My 2012 warranty booklet has 26 such references to Voltec, including a "What is Covered" reference to "Other Voltec Components." In the 2105 warranty manual, the number of references has dropped to 23 and text was modified to: "Other Voltec/Electric Propulsion Components." There are only 4 references to Voltec in the 2016 manual, all in the Warranty Parts List ("Voltec/EREV Specific Components"). The reference to Voltec has entirely disappeared from the 2019 GM warranty manual, with the Emissions Warranty Parts List now covering those parts under the "Hybrid" category.

Perhaps those whose Volts qualify for the PZEV Warranty coverage should note that the PZEV/TZEV warranty includes 15 year/150,000 mile warranty coverage for ALL of the Emission Warranty Parts List items, including the parts listed under the "Other Voltec/Electric Propulsion Components" or "Hybrid" category. The only limitation to items in that list is placed upon "Hybrid batteries and Hybrid A/C compressors, which are covered for 10 years/150,000 miles, whichever comes first." In a sense, this is the flip side of the two GM New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverages where the Voltec warranty extends the coverage from 80,000 to 100,000 miles for both battery and hybrid-related components ... any "10 year Voltec" warranty under CARB regulations would need to be limited to coverage of the battery and a/c compressor only. The remaining "Voltec" components are covered by a 15 year warranty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Your posting is helpful and informative. Let me add a few thoughts regarding emissions-related warranties.

My understanding is that an emissions-related warranty protects the owner against defects in material and workmanship of the emissions-related components. The warranty would NOT provide protection against failure of the parts to provide the level of control required by a specific set of emission regulations unless that failure was caused by a defect in the part itself.

In this sense, warranty coverage itself covers the parts, not the task the parts are being required to do by the laws of the state in which the vehicle is registered (i.e., meet Federal vs California Emissions standards). Your state’s choice of Federal vs California Emissions standards establishes a minimum level of emissions control the equipment must provide before the vehicle is allowed to be registered and operate in the state. Warranties then cover the parts needed to control the emissions at that level or better.

The regulations may then create a number of increasingly strict emission tiers, and vehicles are certified as a certain class of vehicle based on how well the equipment is able to limit the emissions. States desiring to encourage the preservation of the environment may offer incentive to buyers of vehicles certified to produce emissions at lower and lower levels (via rebates or discounts, or perks such as HOV stickers). California regulations are stricter than Federal regulations, and this has encouraged states to promote their own environmental goals by enacting state laws requiring adherence to the California standards (which then enables the state to offer similar perks to those who buy environment-friendly vehicles). Better control over emissions often requires the use of more expensive parts and/or more expensive part installation costs. The vehicles that qualify for the "perks" are often the vehicles with the higher sticker prices.

An agency that created the emission control standards also has an interest in promoting the longevity of the equipment used to provide the vehicle with lower and lower emission levels. The California regulations mandate that vehicle manufacturers provide certain emission warranty coverages for their vehicles. Emissions component warranties that apply to vehicles equipped with parts that maintain higher levels of control over emissions provide better warranty coverage.

I also would note that providing a car with electric propulsion capabilities contributes to the vehicle’s overall ability to limit emissions. The Volt’s "Voltec " components are therefore included in emission component warranty coverage.

The GM New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverage for my 2012 Volt included two "emissions" related warranties, the Emission Select Component Ltd Wty (8 years/80,000 miles) and the Voltec Component Limited Warranty (8 years/100,000 miles). Providing two warranties highlights this distinction: all of the components covered by both warranties are included in the Emission Warranty Parts List section of the warranty book, but the "emissions control components" are covered by warranty for 80,000 miles, whereas the parts associated with the "Voltec," or electric propulsion system portion of the emissions control parts, are covered for 100,000 miles.

I note that over the years, the use of "Voltec" has diminished in GM warranty coverage use to be replaced by references to the vehicle’s Hybrid system. My 2012 warranty booklet has 26 such references to Voltec, including a "What is Covered" reference to "Other Voltec Components." In the 2105 warranty manual, the number of references has dropped to 23 and text was modified to: "Other Voltec/Electric Propulsion Components." There are only 4 references to Voltec in the 2016 manual, all in the Warranty Parts List ("Voltec/EREV Specific Components"). The reference to Voltec has entirely disappeared from the 2019 GM warranty manual, with the Emissions Warranty Parts List now covering those parts under the "Hybrid" category.

Perhaps those whose Volts qualify for the PZEV Warranty coverage should note that the PZEV/TZEV warranty includes 15 year/150,000 mile warranty coverage for ALL of the Emission Warranty Parts List items, including the parts listed under the "Other Voltec/Electric Propulsion Components" or "Hybrid" category. The only limitation to items in that list is placed upon "Hybrid batteries and Hybrid A/C compressors, which are covered for 10 years/150,000 miles, whichever comes first." In a sense, this is the flip side of the two GM New Vehicle Limited Warranty coverages where the Voltec warranty extends the coverage from 80,000 to 100,000 miles for both battery and hybrid-related components ... any "10 year Voltec" warranty under CARB regulations would need to be limited to coverage of the battery and a/c compressor only. The remaining "Voltec" components are covered by a 15 year warranty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I'm am currently an owner of a 2013 volt (143k miles currently) purchased in the CARB state of CA. Recently my volt broke down on fwy with the "reduced propulsion" and "engine not available" error. I had it towed into my local dealership and upon diagnosis they said a drive power module outside of the transmission needed to be replaced before further diagnosis. The module was covered under warranty. Not sure which but I'm assuming the PZEV because that's the only warranty remains according to My Chevrolet. They replaced the module but still, the car does not turn on. They deemed that the transmission has had an internal failure which IS part of the Voltec system and would cost $6800 to repair out of pocket. I did tell them the car should have an extended Voltec warranty due to the fact that it was purchased in CA up to 150k. They dealership claims the only warranty remaining is the PZEV emissions warranty and the transmission is not covered. I have reached out to GM and I am am currently seeking a resolution. I understand that this may be a David vs Goliath situation but I am going to do everything I can to get this fully covered. I know their is a lot of speculation on whether this warranty exists or not. I have yet to hear of any stories of ppl actually filing a claim in a CARB state after the Voltec warranty expired or at least shows it expired on My Chevrolet. If anyone knows of a post where someone did please let me know. So as of tomorrow I will most likely going to war with GM and get to the bottom of this and find out if this 150k Voltec Carb Extended warranty really does exist. I would appreciate any information or help related to this matter and I will keep this discussion updated.
 
21 - 29 of 29 Posts
Top