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Supercapacitors deliver quick bursts of energy during peak power demands and then quickly store energy and capture excess power that's otherwise lost. In the example of an electric car, a supercapacitor can provide needed power for acceleration, while a battery provides range and recharges the supercapacitor between surges.
Supercapacitors boast a high energy storage capacity compared to regular capacitors, but they still lag behind batteries in that area. Supercapacitors are also usually more expensive per unit than batteries. Technically, it is possible to replace the battery of a cell phone with a supercapacitor, and it will charge much faster. Alas, it will not stay charged for long. Supercapacitors are very effective, however, at accepting or delivering a sudden surge of energy, which makes them a fitting partner for batteries. Primary energy sources such as internal combustion engines, fuel cells and batteries work well as a continuous source of low power, but cannot efficiently handle peak power demands or recapture energy because they discharge and recharge slowly. Common supercapacitor applications
Supercapacitors are currently used to harvest power from regenerative braking systems and release power to help hybrid buses accelerate, provide cranking power and voltage stabilization in start/stop systems, backup and peak power for automotive applications, assist in train acceleration, open aircraft doors in the event of power failures, help increase reliability and stability of the energy grid of blade pitch systems, capture energy and provide burst power to assist in lifting operations, provide energy to data centers between power failures and initiation of backup power systems, such as diesel generators or fuel cells and provide energy storage for firming the output of renewable installations and increasing grid stability.

Graphene and batteries

Graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms bound together in a honeycomb lattice pattern, is hugely recognized as a “wonder material” due to the myriad of astonishing attributes it holds. It is a potent conductor of electrical and thermal energy, extremely lightweight chemically inert, and flexible with a large surface area. It is also considered eco-friendly and sustainable, with unlimited possibilities for numerous applications.

In the field of batteries, conventional battery electrode materials (and prospective ones) are significantly improved when enhanced with graphene. Graphene can make batteries that are light, durable and suitable for high capacity energy storage, as well as shorten charging times. It will extend the battery’s life-time, which is negatively linked to the amount of carbon that is coated on the material or added to electrodes to achieve conductivity, and graphene adds conductivity without requiring the amounts of carbon that are used in conventional batteries.

Graphene can improve such battery attributes as energy density and form in various ways. Li-ion batteries can be enhanced by introducing graphene to the battery’s anode and capitalizing on the material’s conductivity and large surface area traits to achieve morphological optimization and performance.

It has also been discovered that creating hybrid materials can also be useful for achieving battery enhancement. A hybrid of Vanadium Oxide (VO2) and graphene, for example, can be used on Li-ion cathodes and grant quick charge and discharge as well as large charge cycle durability. In this case, VO2 offers high energy capacity but poor electrical conductivity, which can be solved by using graphene as a sort of a structural “backbone” on which to attach VO2 - creating a hybrid material that has both heightened capacity and excellent conductivity.

Another example is LFP ( Lithium Iron Phosphate) batteries, that is a kind of rechargeable Li-ion battery. It has a lower energy density than other Li-ion batteries but a higher power density (an indicator of of the rate at which energy can be supplied by the battery). Enhancing LFP cathodes with graphene allowed the batteries to be lightweight, charge much faster than Li-ion batteries and have a greater capacity than conventional LFP batteries.

https://futurism.com/scientists-develop-better-battery-thanks-graphene/

https://www.graphene-info.com/graphene-batteries
 

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Supercapacitors deliver quick bursts of energy during peak power demands and then quickly store energy and capture excess power that's otherwise lost. In the example of an electric car, a supercapacitor can provide needed power for acceleration, while a battery provides range and recharges the supercapacitor between surges.
Supercapacitors boast a high energy storage capacity compared to regular capacitors, but they still lag behind batteries in that area. Supercapacitors are also usually more expensive per unit than batteries. Technically, it is possible to replace the battery of a cell phone with a supercapacitor, and it will charge much faster. Alas, it will not stay charged for long. Supercapacitors are very effective, however, at accepting or delivering a sudden surge of energy, which makes them a fitting partner for batteries. Primary energy sources such as internal combustion engines, fuel cells and batteries work well as a continuous source of low power, but cannot efficiently handle peak power demands or recapture energy because they discharge and recharge slowly. Common supercapacitor applications
Supercapacitors are currently used to harvest power from regenerative braking systems and release power to help hybrid buses accelerate, provide cranking power and voltage stabilization in start/stop systems, backup and peak power for automotive applications, assist in train acceleration, open aircraft doors in the event of power failures, help increase reliability and stability of the energy grid of blade pitch systems, capture energy and provide burst power to assist in lifting operations, provide energy to data centers between power failures and initiation of backup power systems, such as diesel generators or fuel cells and provide energy storage for firming the output of renewable installations and increasing grid stability.

Graphene and batteries

Graphene, a sheet of carbon atoms bound together in a honeycomb lattice pattern, is hugely recognized as a “wonder material” due to the myriad of astonishing attributes it holds. It is a potent conductor of electrical and thermal energy, extremely lightweight chemically inert, and flexible with a large surface area. It is also considered eco-friendly and sustainable, with unlimited possibilities for numerous applications.

In the field of batteries, conventional battery electrode materials (and prospective ones) are significantly improved when enhanced with graphene. Graphene can make batteries that are light, durable and suitable for high capacity energy storage, as well as shorten charging times. It will extend the battery’s life-time, which is negatively linked to the amount of carbon that is coated on the material or added to electrodes to achieve conductivity, and graphene adds conductivity without requiring the amounts of carbon that are used in conventional batteries.

Graphene can improve such battery attributes as energy density and form in various ways. Li-ion batteries can be enhanced by introducing graphene to the battery’s anode and capitalizing on the material’s conductivity and large surface area traits to achieve morphological optimization and performance.

It has also been discovered that creating hybrid materials can also be useful for achieving battery enhancement. A hybrid of Vanadium Oxide (VO2) and graphene, for example, can be used on Li-ion cathodes and grant quick charge and discharge as well as large charge cycle durability. In this case, VO2 offers high energy capacity but poor electrical conductivity, which can be solved by using graphene as a sort of a structural “backbone” on which to attach VO2 - creating a hybrid material that has both heightened capacity and excellent conductivity.

Another example is LFP ( Lithium Iron Phosphate) batteries, that is a kind of rechargeable Li-ion battery. It has a lower energy density than other Li-ion batteries but a higher power density (an indicator of of the rate at which energy can be supplied by the battery). Enhancing LFP cathodes with graphene allowed the batteries to be lightweight, charge much faster than Li-ion batteries and have a greater capacity than conventional LFP batteries.

https://futurism.com/scientists-develop-better-battery-thanks-graphene/

https://www.graphene-info.com/graphene-batteries
Now my head hurts :)
 

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Ok, bottom line: how far in the future are we talking here?
 

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Ok, bottom line: how far in the future are we talking here?
Well, if the Futurism article is credible, they'll be available at the end of 2016. So any day now, I'm sure. Check your Volt. Maybe it already happened.
 

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EEStor ultra-capacitors anyone? They revoluntionized EV's year ago, eliminating the need for batteries. oops, no they fizzled,

I think we are decades away other than some specialized supporting roles in existing cars. But who knows? Hope, and the need for IPO money spring eternal.
 

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Who needs batteries? Just add a Mr. Fusion and a Flux Capacitor.
 

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We see stuff like this all the time. Until any of it actually makes it to market, I'm not worried about how I'll retrofit my Volt or what tech is going to make it obsolete.
 

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Always 5 years out. ;)
 

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Sure, maybe. But "on the cusp" is not the same as available. And they are talking about solid state lithium ion batteries, not untra-capacitors. Solid state batteries are another development that seems still stuck in the lab. Scaling from lab to production is where many dreams die. But I expect we will see solid state before we see ultra-capacitors commercialized.
 

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I know I'm dreaming, but I'm soooo hopeful that the solid state batteries work out AND an upgrade becomes available for our Volts.
 

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But I expect we will see solid state before we see ultra-capacitors commercialized.
I can see a place for big caps, but mostly for supplemental power for not-road-car vehicles. You can size your motors much bigger than your battery can supply (since in batteries, capacity and safe rate of discharge seem to always be in an inverse relationship) having someplace ELSE to get 250-300 kw for a dozen seconds could be very happy. Like that critical 0-10 MPH range for very heavy truck loads, or passing boost for a performance car...
 

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I can see a place for big caps, but mostly for supplemental power for not-road-car vehicles. You can size your motors much bigger than your battery can supply (since in batteries, capacity and safe rate of discharge seem to always be in an inverse relationship) having someplace ELSE to get 250-300 kw for a dozen seconds could be very happy. Like that critical 0-10 MPH range for very heavy truck loads, or passing boost for a performance car...
Yes, thats what I was thinking when I said "some specialized supporting roles".
 

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Problems of possible update isn't for new (battery) tecnology, but for want by productors.

See what Renault made in Europe: kit upgrade original battery of his Zoe from 22kWh to 41kWh, in the same space and with the same tecnologies.

For example, GM never has made avaible upgrade, but from first 2010 gen1 batteries, also LI-ION has grow.
And first time I've open lugguage of my "volt2012" (marked as Opel Ampera, european cloned version) I've found a lot of waste avaibile space on it.

Also our charger is ridicolus, with MOUNTAIN mode current battery can charge at 11kW, so GM can made an upgrade for charger at 11kW.

my2(euro)cent
 
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