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I was talking to one of my friend's the other day about the Volt, and here are some predictions he came up with. They aren't pretty either:

1) It won't go 40 miles on a charge, more like 30.
2) It won't have a plug, meaning the battery will be charged by the gasoline engine only (Thereby eliminating the VERY reason for buying one).
3) It will cost around 40K-50K (over-pricing it to the point that it will be un-affordable to most)

That's just his predictions. He saw 'Who killed the Electric Car' and is skeptical about GM delivering on their earlier statements of 'Plug in charging, 40 miles without gas, under 30K'

I surely hope he's wrong.
 

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1)certainly possible..we'll see.
2) Nah.
3) Maybe $40k upper limit, but not $50.
1) I'd be surprised if it didn't have a 40 mile range under "average" weather and driving conditions (e.g. an EPA cycle). Cold/hot weather and extreme driving (acceleration) may reduce it to 30.
2) no way.
3) I agree with a 40k upper limit. I'm betting on 35K in 2008 dollars (maybe be higher depending on inflation).
 

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#1 - I will be stunned if the Volt has less than 40 mile electric range. It will be more like 50 miles.

#2 - less than zero chance of this happening. Otherwise, it wouldn't be a Volt.

#3 - I agree with pdt, about $35K in 2008 dollars. I'm not sure though if this is before or after tax credits that will be available. Quite possibly BEFORE any tax credits. I think GM is playing a game with us right now on the price. The question really is if they will limit dealer markups or eliminate them completely and sell the car directly to the consumer.

For what its worth, I could care less about the "who killed the electric car" garbage. This is 2008; 2008 technology. If anything, the fact that GM developed the EV1 is making the Volt development less difficult.
 

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1. According to one of the interviews that Lyle has posted in his Blog(Not sure which one), I believe the executive was quoted as saying that the goal was 40 mi range at the end of the warranty period of 10 years. So based on the number of cycles that have been calculated, you're actually looking at 50+ under optimal conditions for a new vehicle.

2. see MeterologyFirst's post.

3. With the rate the dollar is falling and the lowering of costs of production, there is no way to accurately predict what a Volt will cost in 2010. It all depends on whether or not we can maintain or improve the strength of the dollar. If the dollar goes up, the price of the Volt goes down and vice-verse.
 

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1) I would buy if it was only 20 miles. You have to start somewhere. This is a paradigm shift. Plug-in vs. fill up. It will take some time. Just expressing to your friends the joy of driving around your neighborhood in full electric mode will spread the world. Adding capacity after that will be easy as the technology slides along the curve.

2) No plug, No sale.

3) They will sell out the first two years of production if the price was 50 grand. After you weed out the early adopters of course the price will have to come down. Folks, should this car even make it to the showroom floor and be available for purchase is an amazing feat. One that GM is betting it's future on. Imagine this: A real car from a major company with pure EV functionality and the ability to go as long as you want with a real warranty and real service with real resale value.
 

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1) I would buy if it was only 20 miles. You have to start somewhere. This is a paradigm shift. Plug-in vs. fill up. It will take some time. Just expressing to your friends the joy of driving around your neighborhood in full electric mode will spread the world. Adding capacity after that will be easy as the technology slides along the curve.

2) No plug, No sale.

3) They will sell out the first two years of production if the price was 50 grand. After you weed out the early adopters of course the price will have to come down. Folks, should this car even make it to the showroom floor and be available for purchase is an amazing feat. One that GM is betting it's future on. Imagine this: A real car from a major company with pure EV functionality and the ability to go as long as you want with a real warranty and real service with real resale value.[/QUOTE]

Amen to number 3
 

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1) Actually range will most liky vary quite a bit, depending upon things like temperature and accessories used. I'm guessing that the number given out by GM will most likely be something like a lowest common denominatory type of thing (i.e.- say 30 miles but that means with the heater on; normal driving would be much further).
2) It will have a plug.
3) Who knows, but at todays gas prices and given the limited number they plan on making the first year, i'd say that they would sell out pretty quickly even at 50K.
 

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1) I would buy if it was only 20 miles. You have to start somewhere. This is a paradigm shift. Plug-in vs. fill up. It will take some time. Just expressing to your friends the joy of driving around your neighborhood in full electric mode will spread the world. Adding capacity after that will be easy as the technology slides along the curve.

2) No plug, No sale.

3) They will sell out the first two years of production if the price was 50 grand. After you weed out the early adopters of course the price will have to come down. Folks, should this car even make it to the showroom floor and be available for purchase is an amazing feat. One that GM is betting it's future on. Imagine this: A real car from a major company with pure EV functionality and the ability to go as long as you want with a real warranty and real service with real resale value.
AMEN!

In fact I think they shoud offer that same technology in SUVs and crossovers even if they only get 20 miles on the overnight charge. Its the start of something great.

I take the info I get here and debate the merrits of this technology with stealth members of the media and members of government. The biggest concerns people have is the power grid couldn't handle the demand so we need to drill ANWR instead. The guy who says this the most is a DOE guy. Any math on how this technology will affect the national power grid if it becomes the primary way we power our cars?
 

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So, you have a friend that saw a lame movie about electric cars and now he's an authority on electric cars?? Take his opinion with a grain of salt and stay tuned here.

1) It will get it's 40 miles, maybe more. However, it will be conditional just as today's EPA mileages are.

2) It will have a plug. GM has repeatedly said so and the concept was shown with not one, but two. Also there is no technological reason not to do so. It's the easiest of their design challenges.

3) $35k to $40k is probably not far off. Particularly if GM knows in advance that we'll all be getting big tax rebates. The higher the rebate, the higher the MSRP. Then on top of that, with probably at least $5 per gallon gas or more, the demand will out strip supply and dealer mark ups will be between $5k and $10k. The only thing that might temper this a bit would be if other manufacturers were to debut similar E-Rev designs at the same time at a lower cost. Not likely to happen, or if they do it won't be for much less. Bottom line; early adopters will all be in the upper income brakets.

Oh yeah, your friend is most likely a GM hating, Toyota loving, conspiracy theory kind of guy. If you truely have interest in the Volt, ignore him and just come here for news and questions.
 

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So, you have a friend that saw a lame movie about electric cars and now he's an authority on electric cars?? Take his opinion with a grain of salt and stay tuned here.

1) It will get it's 40 miles, maybe more. However, it will be conditional just as today's EPA mileages are.

2) It will have a plug. GM has repeatedly said so and the concept was shown with not one, but two. Also there is no technological reason not to do so. It's the easiest of their design challenges.

3) $35k to $40k is probably not far off. Particularly if GM knows in advance that we'll all be getting big tax rebates. The higher the rebate, the higher the MSRP. Then on top of that, with probably at least $5 per gallon gas or more, the demand will out strip supply and dealer mark ups will be between $5k and $10k. The only thing that might temper this a bit would be if other manufacturers were to debut similar E-Rev designs at the same time at a lower cost. Not likely to happen, or if they do it won't be for much less. Bottom line; early adopters will all be in the upper income brakets.

Oh yeah, your friend is most likely a GM hating, Toyota loving, conspiracy theory kind of guy. If you truely have interest in the Volt, ignore him and just come here for news and questions.


Why do you have to berate and talk down to everyone on this board DaV8or? Do you know everything or do you have a time machine?

GM says a lot of things it doesn't make any of it true until its on the show room floor.
 

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While most car forums frown on resurrecting old posts, that doesn’t seem to be the case here.

Given that, I just found this thread from 2008, as a new (used) volt owner I found it interesting. A year ago, I never thought I would own an EV, now I can’t ever see going back to only ICE as a daily driver.
 

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Oh damnit... now I'm literally cleaning up hot chocolate. CURSE YOU Mister Dave and your sly wit!!!!
 

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Oh damnit... now I'm literally cleaning up hot chocolate. CURSE YOU Mister Dave and your sly wit!!!!
LOL - back at you. I'm smiling now. Not an evil grin....... much. Hope it didn't go up your nose! :D

I stick with coffee, or maybe I don't stick (get sticky nostrils)?
 
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