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You are barking up the wrong tree here. Gov Abbot is pointing the finger at everyone but himself for failing the citizens of Texas. The insurance cost will certainly exceed Hurricane Harvey. Imagine the rate increases.

Page 6 https://www.insurancecouncil.org/userfiles/uploads/2020TexasPandCMarketReport.pdf
I am not backing any horse here. What I am requesting is data to support the claim. So far I haven't seen it. The OP is implying the governor of Texas is being misleading about frozen windmills as if to demonstrate wind power isn't feasible. I'd find that surprising given Texas appears to have made a substantial investment in said technology.
 

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this is the time" it doesnt happen again "
wasnt it 2011 the first time
Versus what, let the people running the California grid take control? They've had a lot more problems more recently than 2011, and that was just on hot days, something Houston gets a quarter of the year. Can you imagine?
 

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this is the time" it doesnt happen again "
wasnt it 2011 the first time
And 1989 the time before that. This is what free enterprise, no laws, no taxes gets you.
 

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And 1989 the time before that. This is what free enterprise, no laws, no taxes gets you.
California also had a major outage that same year with 1.9 million without power, and 98, and 00, and 11, so its not like socialism, heavy regulations, and heavy taxation guarantees a more robust electrical grid, especially when just last year during completely normal weather California was having rolling blackouts due to mismanagement: Rolling Blackouts in California Have Power Experts Stumped
 

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so becouse california has power problems makes it all right for texas to have them
starting to sound like you work for the government
 

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so becouse california has power problems makes it all right for texas to have them
starting to sound like you work for the government
I said earlier heads should roll, but that doesn't mean Texas should lose the right to govern itself. I was responding to the comment that this is supposedly all caused by Texas deregulation and lack of federal control, when California is the polar opposite with heavy federal oversight, regulation, high electricity prices, and high taxes and has even more problems when it comes to their power grid. Texas farted in the elevator and deserves to feel embarrassed, but doesn't deserve finger pointing from the other guy in the elevator that actually pooped his pants! :D
 

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From what I have read, the bigger problem with natural gas wasn't freezing but the fact that the natural gas pumps used need electricity, which wasn't available.
 

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I said earlier heads should roll, but that doesn't mean Texas should lose the right to govern itself. I was responding to the comment that this is supposedly all caused by Texas deregulation and lack of federal control, when California is the polar opposite with heavy federal oversight, regulation, high electricity prices, and high taxes and has even more problems when it comes to their power grid. Texas farted in the elevator and deserves to feel embarrassed, but doesn't deserve finger pointing from the other guy in the elevator that actually pooped his pants! :D
"I said earlier heads should roll, but that doesn't mean Texas should lose the right to govern itself."

why not, if you cant do the job, move over and let someone that can

"I was responding to the comment that this is supposedly all caused by Texas deregulation and lack of federal control, when California is the polar opposite with heavy federal oversight, regulation, high electricity prices, and high taxes and has even more problems when it comes to their power grid."

please respond to them, then

" Texas farted in the elevator and deserves to feel embarrassed, but doesn't deserve finger pointing from the other guy in the elevator that actually pooped his pants!"

someone in the elevator farted, no , people died
and i did no finger pointing, only presented a simple solution, that you took exception to
 

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From what I have read, the bigger problem with natural gas wasn't freezing but the fact that the natural gas pumps used need electricity, which wasn't available.
and where were the standby generators for these pumps
 

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From what I have read, the bigger problem with natural gas wasn't freezing but the fact that the natural gas pumps used need electricity, which wasn't available.
EROCT said frozen instruments. or Instruments and other components iced over
"Texas plants can leave their pipes, valves and pressure gauges exposed"
"The power plants in the Northeast, we put exterior closures around it"


On Tuesday, Dan Woodfin, a senior director for Ercot, attributed the main factors to frozen instruments at natural gas, coal and nuclear plants. He and other Ercot officials said they believed generators had prepared better for such cold.

Ercot’s authority is somewhat limited. In 2011, the last time freezing weather caused rolling outages, it released best practices for power generators to follow, but it couldn’t require anything, said Adrian Shelley, Texas office director of Public Citizen, an advocacy group.
One nuclear reactor and several coal-fired plants went offline, but "Texas is a gas state," Michael Webber, an energy resources professor at the University of Texas, told The Texas Tribune. And "gas is failing in the most spectacular fashion right now." Instruments and other components at gas-fired power plants iced over, and "by some estimates, nearly half of the state's natural gas production has screeched to a halt due to the extremely low temperatures," as electric pumps lost power and uninsulated pipelines and gas wells froze, the Tribune reports.
Texas blackouts triggered by frozen power infrastructure have left many wondering why the state’s electricity generators weren’t prepared for the cold.

The short answer: They aren’t required to cold-proof their assets. While generators in chillier regions are typically compelled by federal or state rules to protect their plants from the elements, Texas plants can leave their pipes, valves and pressure gauges exposed. It’s cheaper that way.

“The power plants in the Northeast, we put exterior closures around it,” said Michael Webber, the chief science and technology officer at Engie, and an energy professor at the University of Texas at Austin. “They wrap a building around the plant.”
 

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According to ERCOT, the first plants to go off-line due to the freezing conditions were Natural Gas plants. So much for fossil fuels!

Seriously though, Texas needs to winterize both their power production and grid. This type of failure, especially since this isn't the first time it's happened is criminal.
 

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why not, if you cant do the job, move over and let someone that can
And who is that "someone"? Federal control and heavy regulations with an over ambitious push to green power produced the West coast grid, that is objectively experiencing issues at a far greater rate than Texas, in spite of the fact that Houston in particular is in a perfect hotspot for severe weather by virtue of its location while California has much milder weather.

I'm not sure why this needs to be said, but the goal isn't to make things in Texas even worse by modeling after a grid that has made an art of mismanagement.
 

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The Texas grid was mismanaged. To say otherwise is to say it all worked as expected and the loss of power and drinking water were totally normal and expected. Obviously no one is saying that. But rather than look at the underlying issues, the blame was aimed at wind turbines and renewable energy in general as the cause. A big, fat lie.
 

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And who is that "someone"? Federal control and heavy regulations with an over ambitious push to green power produced the West coast grid, that is objectively experiencing issues at a far greater rate than Texas, in spite of the fact that Houston in particular is in a perfect hotspot for severe weather by virtue of its location while California has much milder weather.

I'm not sure why this needs to be said, but the goal isn't to make things in Texas even worse by modeling after a grid that has made an art of mismanagement.
yes , much better to stick with whats not working
explain to me how it could be worse, when 1000 people die, 10,000 people die

how about , when 1 person dies
 

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yes , much better to stick with whats not working
explain to me how it could be worse, when 1000 people die, 10,000 people die

how about , when 1 person dies
I agree completely, we should not aim to copy what isn't working, which would include systems like the Western grid, which have more frequent power outages at much higher average costs in spite of having some of the most agreeable weather in the nation.

Inspiration should come from a superior, not inferior, managed system.
The Texas grid was mismanaged. To say otherwise is to say it all worked as expected and the loss of power and drinking water were totally normal and expected. Obviously no one is saying that. But rather than look at the underlying issues, the blame was aimed at wind turbines and renewable energy in general as the cause. A big, fat lie.
There is blame on an overreliance on unwinterized wind power in Texas that produces inconsistent power levels even outside of weather extremes, but absolutely that was not the only issue, nor was it even merely the fact that all power sources weren't sufficiently winter proofed to account for such an unusually long hard freeze, as other mistakes were made including simple things like ensuring that trees were sufficiently managed near power lines and even things under Texan control but not ERCOT's such as line workers unable to get to problem areas due to a road infrastructure that was unsafe due to buildup of black ice which itself caused several deaths with roadway pileups. A good play-by-play is seen in this post mortem:
 

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If there is blame to be placed I suspect that it can be spread far and wide throughout the state, particularly in relation to energy. I have built wind farms that operate perfectly fine down to -30 C, but they needed to have the cold weather option included in the design. Such requirements were handed down by the governing body allowing connection to the grid, which I believe is ERCOT in Texas. The same standards should be applied to other generation assets as a requirement for connection ( ie gas turbine plants). Perhaps they should look to connection requirements of northern jurisdictions for guidance. Retrofitting these generation assets is possible, but it’s much cheaper to do it right during construction.

This is not a politics issue, meaning green vs fossil fuel.

In short, it looks like they bought the cheapest solutions. They just just paid the price.
 
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In short, it looks like they bought the cheapest solutions. They just just paid the price.
They (the private companies) bought the cheapest solutions. They (the people of Texas) paid the price. Basic necessities of life like electricity, health care, etc. should never be left to "for profit" companies. It just doesn't work.
 

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In short, it looks like they bought the cheapest solutions. They just just paid the price.
Although true for some equipment like the turbines or the water supply to one of the nuclear plants, if you see the attached video, most of what went down didn't need to go down in the first place if ERCOT had properly handled things.

Apparently they didn't implement rolling outages until too late when power plants were already tripping. Then when they did implement outages, they may have been ignorant of what infrastructure was in what area and cut power to many substations that were providing the gas supply to the power stations, so natural gas supply was reduced by 75%. When some stations were offline for extended periods, some of their equipment that otherwise would not have frozen was frozen, similar to how a dripping pipe won't freeze over whereas a stagnant pipe will.

Then there's the issue of companies running profitable unreliable power sources without repercussions due to massive artificial market interference, so I liked the presenter's suggestion that all large-scale power sources that can't produce consistent power on the grid, be they intermittent in time of day or due to whether, be required to have a reliable backup solution available. As otherwise as mentioned they end up displacing reliable wattage during BAU operations, causing a misapplication of investment.

As China has learned, to more you mess with the free market, the more inorganic and screwed up it becomes, where they went from mass starvation under central planning from non-field experts to one of the world's largest economies when they finally let go.
 
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