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If Telsa plays this right I can see a huge boon in sales of their solar and powerwall systems.
 

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or the use their cars to run a home.
 

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Gas prices are on the rise too given the impact on production. Likewise if a gas station doesn't have power it can't pump gas.
 

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dumb clickbait anti EV article. Consumers don't pay spot prices on electricity. If they did, consumers would get paid to use electricity at some times in the Mid West when there is an oversupply of wind power.
 

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dumb clickbait anti EV article. Consumers don't pay spot prices on electricity. If they did, consumers would get paid to use electricity at some times in the Mid West when there is an oversupply of wind power.
Here in Finland we have consumer spot price deals. It's pretty normal although only 3-5% of households do that.

Main driver in using the spot prices is that the prices are highest when you're away and lowest when you're at home. Most homes already have previous "night time" electricity installations so you can for example use the energy storing floor heating & boiler on the low price time and turn it off automatically on the high price time. The signal comes from the grid so it's like "fire & forget" kind of deal. They're planning on EV-to-grid also so that on high price time your car (if connected) sells the juice and charges back up on low price time.

And yes, they pay you if the price is reversed.
 
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dumb clickbait anti EV article. Consumers don't pay spot prices on electricity. If they did, consumers would get paid to use electricity at some times in the Mid West when there is an oversupply of wind power.
Could be. Price of electricity in Texas has soared 11,000%. It has gone from $100 per megawatt to $11,000 a megawatt. In one news story, one woman that paid $33 a month last year got a bill with a charge of $450 for one day. Had nothing to do with EVs. They need the money to beef up the infrastructure that didn't meet federal levels. Not a good time to be building a factory in Texas.
 
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Remember, the Texas windmills caused the power outage and water supply issues. You see, windmills are unreliable and can't operate in freezing weather according to the Texas governor. Any facts to the contrary that Iowa, Connecticut, North Dakota, Illinois, Scandinavia, etc. all have windmills that work in freezing weather are fake news. And never mind that 2/3rds of Texas power comes from natural gas, etc. How did the windmills stop those oil & gas supplies from working? Er, ah, ....look! Over there! OAC and her green new deal are coming to confiscate your water supplies! lol
 

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Remember, the Texas windmills caused the power outage and water supply issues. You see, windmills are unreliable and can't operate in freezing weather according to the Texas governor. Any facts to the contrary that Iowa, Connecticut, North Dakota, Illinois, Scandinavia, etc. all have windmills that work in freezing weather are fake news. And never mind that 2/3rds of Texas power comes from natural gas, etc. How did the windmills stop those oil & gas supplies from working? Er, ah, ....look! Over there! OAC and her green new deal are coming to confiscate your water supplies! lol
Google translate:

“Finns when we are, we build our facilities so that they work and do not freeze. They are built to function even in the cold. In many other plants, the technology has been built out to be exposed to frost, because many winters do not have frost at all here, ”says Heikkinen.

Whole article below.

 

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Remember, the Texas windmills caused the power outage and water supply issues. You see, windmills are unreliable and can't operate in freezing weather according to the Texas governor. Any facts to the contrary that Iowa, Connecticut, North Dakota, Illinois, Scandinavia, etc. all have windmills that work in freezing weather are fake news. And never mind that 2/3rds of Texas power comes from natural gas, etc. How did the windmills stop those oil & gas supplies from working? Er, ah, ....look! Over there! OAC and her green new deal are coming to confiscate your water supplies! lol
As a moderator I would think you would refrain from political posts But since you have do you have any evidence to support your implication the governor of Texas is not being forthright?
 

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But since you have do you have any evidence to support your implication the governor of Texas is not being forthright?
The governor was being political. There is no reason for windmills to freeze except for poor planning, failure to invest and poor oversight of the utility. And the wind turbines are a minor part of the Texas power supply in winter. Blaming them and renewables in general when the bulk of the outages were fossil fuel related (again, due to lack of winterization) is at a minimum misleading, though I think it's just lying.

The governor tried shifting the blame to windmills when the bulk of the problems were fossil fuel pipelines. And the windmills were frozen due to the deregulated utility not investing in sensors and blade heating elements to handle freezing weather. Again, other states with wind turbines handle freezing weather just fine. So what this actually shows is NOT that renewables are unreliable, but that unregulated power utilities will cut corners wherever they can, weather is be winterizing turbines or gas pipelines. THAT should have been the governor's focus rather than trying to create a false narrative about wind power generation being unreliable.

Like many other Republicans, Rick Perry also falsely blamed frozen wind turbines for the mass outages, when a widespread failure to invest in winterizing power sources and frozen natural gas pipes played a far bigger role. As millions of Texans struggled to stay warm amid massive cold-weather power outages, Gov. Greg Abbott (R) also directed his ire at the frozen wind turbines.


“This shows how the Green New Deal would be a deadly deal for the United States of America,” Abbott said to host Sean Hannity on Tuesday. “Our wind and our solar got shut down, and they were collectively more than 10 percent of our power grid, and that thrust Texas into a situation where it was lacking power on a statewide basis. ... It just shows that fossil fuel is necessary.”

The governor’s arguments were contradicted by his own energy department, which outlined how most of Texas’s energy losses came from failures to winterize the power-generating systems, including fossil fuel pipelines, The Washington Post’s Will Englund reported. But Abbott’s debunked claims were echoed by other conservatives this week who have repeatedly blamed clean energy sources for the outages crippling the southern U.S.

Frozen wind turbines in Texas caused some conservative state politicians to declare Tuesday that the state was relying too much on renewable energy. But in reality, the wind power was expected to make up only a fraction of what the state had planned for during the winter.

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas projected that 80% of the grid's winter capacity, or 67 gigawatts, could be generated by natural gas, coal and some nuclear power.

An official with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas said Tuesday afternoon that 16 gigawatts of renewable energy generation, mostly wind generation, were offline. Nearly double that, 30 gigawatts, had been lost from thermal sources, which includes gas, coal and nuclear energy.
 
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Remember, the Texas windmills caused the power outage and water supply issues. You see, windmills are unreliable and can't operate in freezing weather according to the Texas governor. Any facts to the contrary that Iowa, Connecticut, North Dakota, Illinois, Scandinavia, etc. all have windmills that work in freezing weather are fake news. And never mind that 2/3rds of Texas power comes from natural gas, etc. How did the windmills stop those oil & gas supplies from working? Er, ah, ....look! Over there! OAC and her green new deal are coming to confiscate your water supplies! lol
Texas' Natural Gas power plants also shutdown because their lines froze. Their solar installations shut down, although those are back up and generating 11GW per day now. Oil refineries shut down. The issue is that Texas government and utility companies have refused to install infrastructure and equipment that can handle freezing conditions.
 

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Could be. Price of electricity in Texas has soared 11,000%. It has gone from $100 per megawatt to $11,000 a megawatt. In one news story, one woman that paid $33 a month last year got a bill with a charge of $450 for one day. Had nothing to do with EVs. They need the money to beef up the infrastructure that didn't meet federal levels. Not a good time to be building a factory in Texas.
I've watched some local TX news to get a better idea on things. Turns out the question if fixed rate or variable rates. They said most folks were on fixed rates but some outrages ones like you mentioned.

Power outrage: Some seeing electric bills as high as $17K in wake of Texas winter storm
Feb 18, 2021
WFAA
 

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The governor was being political. There is no reason for windmills to freeze except for poor planning, failure to invest and poor oversight of the utility. And the wind turbines are a minor part of the Texas power supply in winter. Blaming them and renewables in general when the bulk of the outages were fossil fuel related (again, due to lack of winterization) is at a minimum misleading, though I think it's just lying.

The governor tried shifting the blame to windmills when the bulk of the problems were fossil fuel pipelines. And the windmills were frozen due to the deregulated utility not investing in sensors and blade heating elements to handle freezing weather. Again, other states with wind turbines handle freezing weather just fine. So what this actually shows is NOT that renewables are unreliable, but that unregulated power utilities will cut corners wherever they can, weather is be winterizing turbines or gas pipelines. THAT should have been the governor's focus rather than trying to create a false narrative about wind power generation being unreliable.

Like many other Republicans, Rick Perry also falsely blamed frozen wind turbines for the mass outages, when a widespread failure to invest in winterizing power sources and frozen natural gas pipes played a far bigger role. As millions of Texans struggled to stay warm amid massive cold-weather power outages, Gov. Greg Abbott (R) also directed his ire at the frozen wind turbines.


“This shows how the Green New Deal would be a deadly deal for the United States of America,” Abbott said to host Sean Hannity on Tuesday. “Our wind and our solar got shut down, and they were collectively more than 10 percent of our power grid, and that thrust Texas into a situation where it was lacking power on a statewide basis. ... It just shows that fossil fuel is necessary.”

The governor’s arguments were contradicted by his own energy department, which outlined how most of Texas’s energy losses came from failures to winterize the power-generating systems, including fossil fuel pipelines, The Washington Post’s Will Englund reported. But Abbott’s debunked claims were echoed by other conservatives this week who have repeatedly blamed clean energy sources for the outages crippling the southern U.S.

Frozen wind turbines in Texas caused some conservative state politicians to declare Tuesday that the state was relying too much on renewable energy. But in reality, the wind power was expected to make up only a fraction of what the state had planned for during the winter.

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas projected that 80% of the grid's winter capacity, or 67 gigawatts, could be generated by natural gas, coal and some nuclear power.

An official with the Electric Reliability Council of Texas said Tuesday afternoon that 16 gigawatts of renewable energy generation, mostly wind generation, were offline. Nearly double that, 30 gigawatts, had been lost from thermal sources, which includes gas, coal and nuclear energy.
Are you the governor of Texas? If not you brought politics into this discussion. That said perhaps I missed it but I didn't see any evidence. Perhaps you would be so good as to highlight it for me?
 

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Are you the governor of Texas? If not you brought politics into this discussion. That said perhaps I missed it but I didn't see any evidence. Perhaps you would be so good as to highlight it for me?
You are barking up the wrong tree here. Gov Abbot is pointing the finger at everyone but himself for failing the citizens of Texas. The insurance cost will certainly exceed Hurricane Harvey. Imagine the rate increases.

DALLAS — As we were the first to report, insurance companies are expecting this winter mess that has walloped Texas to become the state's most expensive insured loss ever. See the current list of past events that have cost Texas insurers the most by looking at page six here.
I had to double-check the assertion with the Insurance Council of Texas when they told me this winter event could become the most expensive insured loss, just to make sure. Bigger than Hurricane Harvey? That was $20 billion in claims.
"Absolutely. Harvey was terrible. It was a several-day event, but when we are talking about the entire state and when we are talking about auto claims, business claims, and homeowners and renters...yes, we are definitely going to be in the billions of dollars,"
said Insurance Council of Texas Director of Communications Camille Garcia.
Page 6 https://www.insurancecouncil.org/userfiles/uploads/2020TexasPandCMarketReport.pdf
 

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what i heard is that everyone was using natural gas to keep warm in uninsulated homes to a point that their wasnt enough gas left to run power plants
 

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what i heard is that everyone was using natural gas to keep warm in uninsulated homes to a point that their wasnt enough gas left to run power plants
The article which I quoted earlier, notes that the gas pressure in the pipes (may it be from freezing or over use) dropped to a level that gas turbine plants were not able to run. What were running were the Wärtsilä plants which use combustion engine technology. Those can run pretty much on vapors, are more efficient and produce less CO2 and use far less water to operate.

 

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Here's the thing, like a home built without insulation, the power generation infrastructure in Texas is not equipped to handle freezing weather nor is it required to do so.

Blaming renewable energy as the cause for the resulting crisis was deceitful and a lie. Might as well blame rooftop solar power for auto accidents on icy streets instead of on a lack of salt trucks. Had there been no wind turbines in Texas the power loss crisis still would have happened and it would have been just as bad.

My state of Illinois has the same variety of power sources as Texas including renewables, and they continued to function during the arctic freeze. The governor should have acknowledged the lack of winterized infrastructure in Texas as the root cause and pledged to push for regulations like other states have requiring power generators to address that issue.

Of course that brings up an uncomfortable question, why is Texas seeing this kind of severe weather? The polar vortex, a weather pattern that originates in the Arctic, is increasingly descending to lower latitudes. Climate change models suggest we will experience more extreme storms. And severe weather is becoming more common, whether it's severe cold in southern states or the intense heat wave in California last year that fueled deadly wildfires.

The discussion invariable turns to, "but we can't afford to...". But as Scott's Texas Loss Events chart above shows, no free lunch. Whether spiking electric rates or property damage, we will pay for it one way or the other.
 

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Yup, can't afford not to. The problem is more variable extreme weather is a world problem not a political area problem. Pulling out of Paris Accord may help stuff ballot boxes but it doesn't help the people of Texas, the people under ever increasing tornados or under ever increasing hurricanes. These aren't straight line relationships which makes it harder make the point to some. If you don't prepare for the worst, sooner or later, it will bite you in the ass.
 
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If Telsa plays this right I can see a huge boon in sales of their solar and powerwall systems.
Wouldn't play well IMO, as Texans have been very excited about wind and solar, with some of the most ambitious projects in the nation with it rapidly increasing to the point its about 30% of our total capacity... but alas it proved its unreliability again.

Solar doesn't produce much in the winter, especially typical non winterized versions for Texas that would be covered in snow on overcast days with the nights being the coldest where solar doesn't help. Heating also requires so much power that I doubt their powerwall would help, unless it was only to run the fan for a natural gas heating system which makes way more sense in Houston for heating purposes. That could work, as that's what we used our gasoline generators for to keep us from freezing.

Hopefully what Texans have learned is that nuclear power is the most robust power source in areas that are not earthquake prone, which Texas certainly is not, and should see more investment. IMO solar and wind aren't reliable enough to make up even more of our grid than they already do, and we should transition the coal contribution all to nuclear, and leave natural gas as its generally reliable and hugely abundant here. Natural gas was the only thing that worked for us all week when power was out, and its very efficient for heating. I'm insisting our next home have a natural gas whole-home generator backup system with gas dryer and stovetop.
 
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