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Discussion Starter #1
I know about keeping the green ball centered on the dash, limiting climate control use, and everything else in the on-board tutorial, but how about using L and mountain mode more often and in different driving scenarios.

I drive nearly entirely highway travel to work and am always 5-10 miles short on my range. This is not terrible, but if anyone has other suggestions that I may not know of, feel. Free to share.

I just an article a out using mountain mode on long highway stretches can be more efficient and save electric for city. Anyone else agree with this method?

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I know about keeping the green ball centered on the dash, limiting climate control use, and everything else in the on-board tutorial, but how about using L and mountain mode more often and in different driving scenarios.

I drive nearly entirely highway travel to work and am always 5-10 miles short on my range. This is not terrible, but if anyone has other suggestions that I may not know of, feel. Free to share.

I just an article a out using mountain mode on long highway stretches can be more efficient and save electric for city. Anyone else agree with this method?

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The only effective way to get more range out of the battery, without replacing it with gas usage, is to stay off the highway. Higher speed uses more power.
 

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How fast on the hwy?
About 50mph should get you there without much effort (in the summer, at least)

Also if you're not trained yet - use the energy display on the DIC to find out what a true coast feels like for pedal position.
Even under 'D', it will put a fair chunk of regen when you let off the pedal at freeway speeds.
If you just let up until it says 0.5 you'll coast longer and get a tiny bit more efficiency.
If you want to try L, same thing, just make sure you keep enough pressure to coast when needed and are only regening/braking when necessary.
 

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This is my ~ 50 mile commute, and 2/3 of it is on 55 mph highways:

IMG_20160129_085505.jpg

My advice:

  • Speed kills range. Keep it as low as you can while maintaining a safe driving speed.
  • Inflate your tires. I see at least a 5% improvement in range by keeping my tires at least 42 to 44 PSI. Also, it appears that increased inflation might lead to longer tire life (unsubstantiated).
  • Look for alternate routes. My 50-mile commute allows me to choose several different routes that are all about the same distance. One route includes about four miles of 65 mph freeway. That is enough to require me to use gasoline when I otherwise wouldn't need to.
  • Drive in Normal Mode. For me, driving in Sport Mode is a game to see how efficient I can be, but even after four years of driving a Volt, I still have slightly better efficiency in Normal Mode.
  • Check your climate settings. Be comfortable, but if you want to avoid gasoline usage, use the bare minimum climate settings necessary to maintain comfort.
 

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This is my ~ 50 mile commute, and 2/3 of it is on 55 mph highways:

View attachment 111434

My advice:

  • Speed kills range. Keep it as low as you can while maintaining a safe driving speed.
  • Inflate your tires. I see at least a 5% improvement in range by keeping my tires at least 42 to 44 PSI. Also, it appears that increased inflation might lead to longer tire life (unsubstantiated).
  • Look for alternate routes. My 50-mile commute allows me to choose several different routes that are all about the same distance. One route includes about four miles of 65 mph freeway. That is enough to require me to use gasoline when I otherwise wouldn't need to.
  • Drive in Normal Mode. For me, driving in Sport Mode is a game to see how efficient I can be, but even after four years of driving a Volt, I still have slightly better efficiency in Normal Mode.
  • Check your climate settings. Be comfortable, but if you want to avoid gasoline usage, use the bare minimum climate settings necessary to maintain comfort.
These same recommendations will work for any car, EREV, BEV, or gas. I managed up to 22 MPG driving carefully in my 1995 Buick Regal, which had an EPA rated 18 MPG. The speed reduction is the best one, since I drive below the posted limits, and let the foolish speedsters pass me and get dangerously closer to their deaths.
 

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Like others said, drive like a grandpa - 50 mph or less, avoid Mountain mode (unless you need to traverse a mountain), coast as much as possible, avoid regen as much as possible, yet be safe so you don't hit anyone. The cruise control works well at maintaining your speed, but it also accelerates very efficiently, so if you had to stop or slow down and you you can resume cruise by flicking the switch upwards, and the volt will efficiently get you back up to speed. Instead of using the brakes or accelerator adjust your speed while in cruise, just nudge the speed up or down as needed to adjust for traffic.

I drove like a grandpa for about 2 years before I said screw it, I'll just drive from now on. I slapped on a new set of 18" wheels, heavier tires with deep tread for traction a, and now drive 70 mph on the interstate instead of 50 mpg on the back country roads. My MPG has dropped from about 95 to 85 mpg and I now get to work and home a few minutes earlier. I've gotten 50 miles of range probably 2 dozen times, the other attempts were thwarted by high heat causing me to turn on the AC.

On the topic of using L, it usually hurts you to do so much regen,plus you end up staying on the accelerator longer wasting energy to hit the right moment to lift to a stop. You can always feather it to drive just as efficiently, but with my driving habits I found it better to drive in D and even put it in N for a long coast from 50 mph to 30 hewn transitioning from country road to city.
 

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Hellooo ............Are you saying you consistantly get +49EV miles on a 55MPH highway Doing 55MPH or more like 45-51mpH. IF so, that is pretty good. I better chk my tire press. The 3 times i got over 49 I was doing 45 maybe 53 for a bit, in slower traffic on the 55MPH highway. and I have the 2015 larger battery.

I do the coast thing also and that's when i get over 48EV.



This is my ~ 50 mile commute, and 2/3 of it is on 55 mph highways:

View attachment 111434

My advice:

  • Speed kills range. Keep it as low as you can while maintaining a safe driving speed.
  • Inflate your tires. I see at least a 5% improvement in range by keeping my tires at least 42 to 44 PSI. Also, it appears that increased inflation might lead to longer tire life (unsubstantiated).
  • ettings. Be comfortable, but if you want to avoid gasoline usage, use the bare minimum climate settings necessary to maintain comfort.
 

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Hellooo ............Are you saying you consistantly get +49EV miles on a 55MPH highway Doing 55MPH or more like 45-51mpH. IF so, that is pretty good. I better chk my tire press. The 3 times i got over 49 I was doing 45 maybe 53 for a bit, in slower traffic on the 55MPH highway. and I have the 2015 larger battery.

I do the coast thing also and that's when i get over 48EV.
I would say fairly consistently. The overall, average speed is probably closer 40-45 mph, but that is because about 1/3 of my commute is city. Weather is a factor, but I'm pretty lucky in where I live. I've noticed that traffic lights have as much of an impact on my range as the speed. If traffic is absolutely clear, I can drive 55 mph most of the trip and still do it 100% on battery. However, if (when I am in city traffic) I hit more than half of the red lights, I can rarely make the entire commute on 100% on battery. Part of that is because most of the city roads are still 45-50 mph, so coming to a complete stop really hurts economy.

Lately, I've been using the route that adds about four miles of 65 mph freeway. The overall distance is the same, but it drops my EV range down to about 45 miles with the remainder on gasoline (~.10 gallons).
 

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For many months out of the year I can get just at 50 EV MILES when I make my monthly trips from my home in Illinios to Lambert St Louis IAP, most of which is on 70 with speeds averaging 60 MPH.

Here's my last trip


And I hav AC on ECO.
 

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In a 2013 yet? 60MPH. I do realize that driving techniques can get extra miles. But, steady MPH is steady MPH. It seems that not all 2013 models had consistant performance specs. I do not recall getting over 45 - 47 EV max in 3 years with the 2013.
The 2015 I have gets 10.9-11KW-hrs when near 50EV on a slower 45-55MPH day.




For many months out of the year I can get just at 50 EV MILES when I make my monthly trips from my home in Illinios to Lambert St Louis IAP, most of which is on 70 with speeds averaging 60 MPH.
And I hav AC on ECO.
 

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In a 2013 yet? 60MPH. I do realize that driving techniques can get extra miles. But, steady MPH is steady MPH. It seems that not all 2013 models had consistant performance specs. I do not recall getting over 45 - 47 EV max in 3 years with the 2013.
The 2015 I have gets 10.9-11KW-hrs when near 50EV on a slower 45-55MPH day.
My 2012 had a similar range to my 2015, but it had the late-model battery and the longer air dam.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Do I have to use a scan tool to see current kwh or is there a setting I haven't found yet? I think I've also seen some posts about max battery capacity data, which I assume is also found in an app or scan tool pid?

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I drive an ELR, which is a bulkier, heavier, less efficient vehicle, driving on wide tires. Its advertised EV range is only 37 miles. My commute is 46 miles, of which about 38 miles is on 55-65mph interstate highway.

A couple of times, I've been able to get to work on EV alone. I was surprised to find that staying on the 65mph highway is actually sometimes more efficient than finding new routes on the 35-50mph back roads. I work to maintain as constant and modest a speed as possible, and limit my stop/starts and turns. Momentum is KEY to efficiency.

"L" is good for stop and go traffic, but NOT for highway driving. Strong regen steals your momentum, and the amount of energy you push back into the battery is far smaller than the amount you have to expend to get back your momentum. I'll drop it into Low when I'm traveling on roads that require stops or turns; my favorite place to use it is going downhill towards a stop sign; if I have no choice but to stop, I might as well get some juice out of it.

I have the benefit of adaptive cruise control. I will happily get on the 65mph highway, set ACC to 67mph, and then look for a semi to sit behind for as long as possible. The best ones have GPS tracking or governors that keep their speed at or below the limit; it provides me with a convenient excuse to keep my speed (and my energy consumption) down. They go 65mph on the flats and slow to a more efficient 55mph going up hills. ACC and the quest for maximum efficiency have made me a significantly more calm driver.

--Chris
 

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Another thing to check, you bought your Volt used... most lease returns have cheap non-low rolling resistance tires put on to replace worn out stock tires. If this is the case it kills range pretty bad. I just purchased and installed a set of 215/55R-17 BRIDGESTONE ECOPIA EP422 PLUS tires to replace the 215/55/17 "Fusion touring" tires that came on the car from the dealership. Last time I did a hypermiling test running the non-lrr fusion tires at 38 psi I made 50 miles and that was going a steady 40 mph with perhaps one stop light or possibly two (this about a year ago, can't remember). Today under the same weather conditions and same route on the new tires set at 42 psi (not broken in yet) I drove 55 miles... a 10% improvement in AER on tires that are not broken in yet! From what everyone here says they will improve a bit more over the next 2,000 miles of driving.

Keith
 

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If you're driving in the city, here are the biggest impactors:

Speed: I think I saw that the car is most efficient at something like 28 mph. Now, don't be a jerk and drive that slow when people are behind you, but I found if I can drive 30-35 when that allows, I get drastically better efficiency. I always drive the speed limit now, or 5 under when no cars are behind me (and I'm not in a hurry).

Acceleration: I stopped using the green ball. It's a good starter, but it's vague. I find it far more useful to use the energy in/out display. I found on flat ground I can accelerate up to 35 with a constant draw of 9-10 kw. Typically, I use 15 kw when I'm hypermiling though. Yes, it takes a while, and again, don't do that when people are behind you. If I have people behind me, I use 25 kw. It takes some precise pedal control. I wish the pedal was a little less sensitive. After a while though, you figure out what energy you want to use to accelerated, and what you need to go a certain speed. They do change some depending on outside temp, if the car is already warm, if I'm running heat/ac etc.

Cruising: I find that as I'm getting up to speed, I lower the acceleration a little, and actually, i find I can let off the accelerator more than I think and maintain speed. For a week or two, pay close attention to how much power you need to cruise at certain speeds in open air, and while drafting (safely). Keeping up with traffic is sometimes more important than overall lower speed if you have to be in open air and getting passed by everyone. A semi in front of you, and one to the side is amazing. I sometimes wonder if you even use any energy at all when you can get yourself into that position. Freaky though.

I honestly don't think eco AC uses much energy at all compared to how much it helps comfort levels. After a few weeks of sweating it out, I tried a week of eco AC... I now go to AC much quicker than before if I need it. Comfort does use more though. Not nearly as much as heat, but more.

I have a 2013 with 90k miles. I have LRR tires on front, normal on back (grrr), and run 44 psi on all. with a 50/50 mix of highway/city on my commute, I get 47 just driving normal conservative, and 51-52 hypermiling. My best is 57 on a charge. 20 miles each way to work.

Highway driving is definitely harder, and it still seems like a challenge trying to figure out when to draft, when to just get out of traffic and go slower etc. Some cars make a larger impact to draft, etc. Use the flow meter. Report results to help everyone else with what you find. What else can you do :)
 

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All good info...
If you're coming in to RahChaCha on 390, 490, or 590 (or even 104!) you're kind of stuck doing as others allow. But, we have had stupid hot weather of late and that will drain power. If you have a 240 charger at home try to leave the HVAC set at comfort and fairly cool and remote start/precondition a bit before leaving in the morning. Then switch to eco on the drive. I'm finding that makes a large difference. Of course do the opposite come winter. Also, since you're an unabashed gearhead are you still driving like one? If so, try to enjoy the tranquility a bit more and not the ponies under the hood. Range will likely come up a bit. Though for a 2012 you seem to be getting pretty good results. My 2014 has hit 50 AER once and that was a test on my part. Winter was showing only mid-30's but reality was less when I needed heat. Now I'm showing (and getting) 44.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If you're driving in the city, here are the biggest impactors:

Speed: I think I saw that the car is most efficient at something like 28 mph. Now, don't be a jerk and drive that slow when people are behind you, but I found if I can drive 30-35 when that allows, I get drastically better efficiency. I always drive the speed limit now, or 5 under when no cars are behind me (and I'm not in a hurry).

Acceleration: I stopped using the green ball. It's a good starter, but it's vague. I find it far more useful to use the energy in/out display. I found on flat ground I can accelerate up to 35 with a constant draw of 9-10 kw. Typically, I use 15 kw when I'm hypermiling though. Yes, it takes a while, and again, don't do that when people are behind you. If I have people behind me, I use 25 kw. It takes some precise pedal control. I wish the pedal was a little less sensitive. After a while though, you figure out what energy you want to use to accelerated, and what you need to go a certain speed. They do change some depending on outside temp, if the car is already warm, if I'm running heat/ac etc.

Cruising: I find that as I'm getting up to speed, I lower the acceleration a little, and actually, i find I can let off the accelerator more than I think and maintain speed. For a week or two, pay close attention to how much power you need to cruise at certain speeds in open air, and while drafting (safely). Keeping up with traffic is sometimes more important than overall lower speed if you have to be in open air and getting passed by everyone. A semi in front of you, and one to the side is amazing. I sometimes wonder if you even use any energy at all when you can get yourself into that position. Freaky though.

I honestly don't think eco AC uses much energy at all compared to how much it helps comfort levels. After a few weeks of sweating it out, I tried a week of eco AC... I now go to AC much quicker than before if I need it. Comfort does use more though. Not nearly as much as heat, but more.

I have a 2013 with 90k miles. I have LRR tires on front, normal on back (grrr), and run 44 psi on all. with a 50/50 mix of highway/city on my commute, I get 47 just driving normal conservative, and 51-52 hypermiling. My best is 57 on a charge. 20 miles each way to work.

Highway driving is definitely harder, and it still seems like a challenge trying to figure out when to draft, when to just get out of traffic and go slower etc. Some cars make a larger impact to draft, etc. Use the flow meter. Report results to help everyone else with what you find. What else can you do :)
Where is the energy in/out display?

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Where is the energy in/out display?

Sent from my LGLS770 using Tapatalk
13's and up had it as a selectable display in the drivers LCD, use the SELCTOR knob on the left side of the dash to rotate through the options.
 
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