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Discussion Starter #1
I am beginning to look for an EVSE. ClipperCreek seems to build a nice quality unit. Any comments on ClipperCreek?

I know the Volt takes a 16 amp EVSE but can it take a 32 amp EVSE? I am thinking ahead, as maybe more and more EV's will handle higher amps for a quicker charge.

Will 32 amps be ok, or will the higher amps harm my 2018 Volt?

Your comments?
 

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I am beginning to look for an EVSE. ClipperCreek seems to build a nice quality unit. Any comments on ClipperCreek?

I know the Volt takes a 16 amp EVSE but can it take a 32 amp EVSE? I am thinking ahead, as maybe more and more EV's will handle higher amps for a quicker charge.

Will 32 amps be ok, or will the higher amps harm my 2018 Volt?

Your comments?
Many here are fans of the Clipper Creek (CC) line of EVSE. The CC EVSE carry a 3 year warranty from CC and have a 25ft charging cord. The CC EVSE has basic indicator lights, no power readout display or internet connection that some other brands of EVSE offer. Having an internet connection is a feature that some people like so they can control the EVSE from their phone and also capture their charging data and plot graphs, etc. Also some other brands of EVSE support the ability to program a delayed start of charging for off peak charging. Since the Volt already supports the ability to set peak and off peak charging windows (day and time of day), delayed charging and syncing charging to anticipated time of departure to help you minimize electricity costs. Having an EVSE that is programmable does not add much if any additional capability. The CC LCS-20 series is well suited to charging the Volt and is available with a variety of 230V plug configurations and is also available in a hard wired configuration.

Your Volt can charge at a maximum of 230 volts and 16 amps (3.6kW). This is the power that the LCS-20 EVSE is designed to deliver. You can of course plug into any Level 2 EVSE with a J1772 connector, even a commercial Level 2 EVSE rated at 9.6kW but the Volt will only ever use a maximum of 3.6kW, It won't hurt anything in the Volt but it won't charge any faster than it would when connected to an EVSE such as the LCS-20. If you are going to run a new circuit from your electrical panel or sub panel then by all means spend a little more to have a 4-wire run in a large enough wire gauge that can support a 50 amp circuit. A 50 amp rated circuit will be able to support an EVSE that rated at 40 amps, capable of delivering 7.2kW. This is twice the maximum power that the Volt currently uses when charging on a Level 2 EVSE but well suited for whatever your future EV charging needs might be. For comparison, the Volt charging at 230V/16amps will add approx. 12 miles of EV range per hour of charging. An EV charging at 230V and 32 amps (the maximum load for an EVSE rated at 40 amps) would add approx. 25 miles of EV range per hour of charging.
 

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The amount of current going into the Volt's charger is controlled by the car, not the EVSE. While the EVSE can supply 32 amps, the car will tell it to only provide 16 amps. It will work just fine on your Volt.
 

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An EVSE is not a charger, so getting one now that has a higher rating is a good idea. Your Volt (or any other car you plug into it) controls the speed and amps coming in dynamically for the best battery longevity, so you're never going to "overcharge" a vehicle by having one with greater capacity.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Do the larger EVSE's have the same plug that the Volt uses?
 

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Do the larger EVSE's have the same plug that the Volt uses?
Yes, they are all J1772 where the EVSE plugs into the car. The wall connection between the EVSE and your house power can be either hardwired, or a 240v outlet. I suggest a 240v outlet, specifically a NEMA 14-50 outlet, which is common to motorhomes.

I have a Bosch (GM) charger (hardwired), a Clipper Creek 20 (14-30 plug), and a JuiceBox 40 (14-50 plug). All work fine. The Juicebox uses a really thick cable though.

Your factory 120v charger will operate at 240vac and 12 amps if you supply it with 240vac. This requires you to make or buy an adapter. I made one, so my Gen2 Volts chargers are also Level 2 chargers. I have charged hundreds of times this way with no issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Your factory 120v charger will operate at 240vac and 12 amps if you supply it with 240vac. This requires you to make or buy an adapter. I made one, so my Gen2 Volts chargers are also Level 2 chargers. I have charged hundreds of times this way with no issue.
This sounds interesting, but I'm not sure how one would do that? Are you saying that the EVSE that comes with the Volt (that I am presently using with a 120V plug) can be used with 240V without hurting anything? Does it charge fast like a Level 2 EVSE?
 

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This sounds interesting, but I'm not sure how one would do that? Are you saying that the EVSE that comes with the Volt (that I am presently using with a 120V plug) can be used with 240V without hurting anything? Does it charge fast like a Level 2 EVSE?
The 120v EVSE that came with your car is a Clipper Creek that accepts both 120v and 240v. However, GM does not supply adapters to run them off 240v.

Max charging with a Gen 2 Volt is 240v x 16 amps. The factory portable 120v EVSE will operate at 240v x 12 amps. So it will charge at 3/4th the speed of 16 amp (or higher) EVSE. So about 6.5 hours for a full charge depending on your actual voltage.

First you need a 240 volt outlet, or two 120v volt outlets that use different hots. Your house is a 3 wire house. Two wires are hots at 120v and one is a neutral. The neutral is the fat blade of a 120v plug.

If you take the two different hots and check their voltage against each other, you'll see 240 volts. So if one wall socket uses one hot, and another uses the second hot, if you touch the two thin blades, you'll see 240v. So you make a Y connector from parts at Home Depot. A female 120v plug, and 2 male 120v plugs.

There is somebody on this site who used to make adapters. Try doing a search.
 

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First you need a 240 volt outlet, or two 120v volt outlets that use different hots. Your house is a 3 wire house. Two wires are hots at 120v and one is a neutral. The neutral is the fat blade of a 120v plug.

If you take the two different hots and check their voltage against each other, you'll see 240 volts. So if one wall socket uses one hot, and another uses the second hot, if you touch the two thin blades, you'll see 240v. So you make a Y connector from parts at Home Depot. A female 120v plug, and 2 male 120v plugs.

There is somebody on this site who used to make adapters.
See http://gm-volt.com/forum/showthread.php?218442-Gen2-Volt-EVSE-conversion-to-L2-L1-combo-DONE!
 

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The one warning I can give for this is that if you looking to wire a 50-amp circuit, be sure to use an appropriately sized EVSE (e.g. one rated for 50 amps).

Using a lower-amperage EVSE can potentially present an issue if there is some sort of electrical malfunction in the EVSE unit as it may not cause enough of a draw/drain to trip the breaker.

Are you saying that the EVSE that comes with the Volt (that I am presently using with a 120V plug) can be used with 240V without hurting anything? Does it charge fast like a Level 2 EVSE?
Yes - the EVSE supplied with the Gen2 Volt can work with both 120v and 240v. You just need an adapter to plug it into a 16A 240V socket. It does charge slightly slower than a true L2 EVSE but still in the range of 4-4.5 hours for a full charge.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The 120v EVSE that came with your car is a Clipper Creek that accepts both 120v and 240v. However, GM does not supply adapters to run them off 240v.
So ClipperCreek makes the portable EVSE that came with my car? I don't recall seeing their name or logo on the unit.

The plug on my factory unit is a typical grounded 120V plug. Would I cut that off the cord and replace it with a 240V plug?
Does the unit automatically switch to 240Vv w/o burning up the unit?

I like this idea, as I don't have to spend a bucnh on a EVSE box unit.

BTW - can the factory portable unit get wet? Can it be left out in the rain?
 

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If you're worried about the future, keep in mind that if you need to wire either the EVSE or the outlet, you can run larger wire. That way if higher power becomes standard you can just swap out the breakers and the outlet. That's simple and inexpensive. Running the wire is the expensive part, but running thicker gauge wire doesn't cost that much.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
If you're worried about the future, keep in mind that if you need to wire either the EVSE or the outlet, you can run larger wire. That way if higher power becomes standard you can just swap out the breakers and the outlet. That's simple and inexpensive. Running the wire is the expensive part, but running thicker gauge wire doesn't cost that much.
Can #8 wire use a 20 amp breaker?
 

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...you mean to ask can #8 wire handle 20 AMPS?
Well yes, in fact #8 wire is really overkill for 20 AMPS.

#10 gauge wire can readily handle 40 AMPS at 240VAC.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
...you mean to ask can #8 wire handle 20 AMPS?
Well yes, in fact #8 wire is really overkill for 20 AMPS.

#10 gauge wire can readily handle 40 AMPS at 240VAC.
Actually, #10 is only rated for up to 24 amps.
 

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Can #8 wire use a 20 amp breaker?
I doubt #8 wire will clamp in a 20-amp breaker. Use a sub-panel.

I bought a large EVSE (32-amp) simply because all the components will last a long time at a low load. 5-years and two different cars so far.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Does anybody know what is inside the EVSE box? Could you just cut the cord that comes out of the standard GM box, attach a 240V plug to the cut end and plug that cord directly into a 240V wall plug? would that work, or is there some type of mechanism inside the EVSE that is a 'must'?
 

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Actually, #10 is only rated for up to 24 amps.
Unless specifically permitted in Section 240.4(E) through (G), the overcurrent
protection shall not exceed 15 amperes for 14 AWG, 20 amperes for 12 AWG, and 30 amperes for 10 AWG copper

If permitted...
Temperature Rating of Copper Conductors
60°C - 30 amps
75°C - 35 amps
90°C - 40 amps
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Unless specifically permitted in Section 240.4(E) through (G), the overcurrent
protection shall not exceed 15 amperes for 14 AWG, 20 amperes for 12 AWG, and 30 amperes for 10 AWG copper
Yes. Correct, but the 30 amp breaker should only be used at 80%, which is the 24 amps I spoke of.
 
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