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Hi All

I looking to purchase a charger but don't know what specs to go with. I have a 30A outlet and the volt only uses 16A. Can I plug into it?

Thanks in advance!
 

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Yes, you can plug in to it. The circuit rating is the maximum load it can handle based on the wiring and outlet - drawing less than that doesn't cause any problems.

Clipper Creek is well thought of here as a source for EVSEs, and they offer both hardwired and plug in models; they may have one with your exact plug, or you might need an adapter.

Some versions of the OEM 120V cord are apparently fine on 240V with an adapter according to people here; I'm not sure that I recommend that.
 

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Hi All

I looking to purchase a charger but don't know what specs to go with. I have a 30A outlet and the volt only uses 16A. Can I plug into it?

Thanks in advance!
It is effectively no different than plugging a (milliamps) phone charger into a 15A receptacle in your house.

 

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It is effectively no different than plugging a (milliamps) phone charger into a 15A receptacle in your house.
Not exactly. The charging block has protection to protect the downstream cable and phone. Most EVSE's do not have built in overcicuit protection. I would also recommend a 20A circuit breaker or fuse.
 

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Not exactly. The charging block has protection to protect the downstream cable and phone. Most EVSE's do not have built in overcicuit protection. I would also recommend a 20A circuit breaker or fuse.
Further to that point, the installation instructions for a particular EVSE should indicate the correct circuit breaker size. For example, a Clipper Creek LCS-25 would require a 25 amp breaker (though in practice 25A is rare and code allows the next available size: 30A) An HCS-40 would require a 40 amp breaker, although since the Volt would never normally use more than 16 amps you could put an HCS-40 on a 30A breaker

Under-fusing is a potential annoyance. Over-fusing is dangerous.
 

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Further to that point, the installation instructions for a particular EVSE should indicate the correct circuit breaker size. For example, a Clipper Creek LCS-25 would require a 25 amp breaker (though in practice 25A is rare and code allows the next available size: 30A) An HCS-40 would require a 40 amp breaker, although since the Volt would never normally use more than 16 amps you could put an HCS-40 on a 30A breaker

Under-fusing is a potential annoyance. Over-fusing is dangerous.
Just to repeat what someone else mentioned on one of the other many threads on this subject.
The breaker is not there to protect the device. It is there to protect the wires and the house they are installed in. The breaker should be sized by the size of the wire in the wall.
 

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The EVSE and car negotiate the max draw (amps) and don't exceed it.

I have been using a 40-amp GE with a '13 Volt and a '14 ELR for four years. Zero issues.
 

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This not correct. You need to account for a 10% loss. You should have a 50 amp breaker and appropriate wire for a 40 amp rated charger to get the 40 amp rate. For a 25 amp charger you should have a 30 amp outlet. For a 32 amp charger you should have at least a 40 amp outlet. If you need to install the wire I would run the appropriate cable for 50 or 60 amp. You can put the breaker size you currently need and easily change the breaker and outlet type out as needed. I would put in a 50 amp breaker and outlet and use either a 32 or 40 amp rated plug-in charger. You can easily change the charger out since it is a plug-in type that just mounts to the wall.
 

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Not exactly. The charging block has protection to protect the downstream cable and phone. Most EVSE's do not have built in overcicuit protection. I would also recommend a 20A circuit breaker or fuse.
My impression is that EVSEs typically do have builtin fuses, particularly ones which have a plug rather than being designed for only hardwired installation (though I have seen builtin fuses on them as well).
 

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This not correct. You need to account for a 10% loss. You should have a 50 amp breaker and appropriate wire for a 40 amp rated charger to get the 40 amp rate. For a 25 amp charger you should have a 30 amp outlet. For a 32 amp charger you should have at least a 40 amp outlet. If you need to install the wire I would run the appropriate cable for 50 or 60 amp. You can put the breaker size you currently need and easily change the breaker and outlet type out as needed. I would put in a 50 amp breaker and outlet and use either a 32 or 40 amp rated plug-in charger. You can easily change the charger out since it is a plug-in type that just mounts to the wall.
What 10%? There is a 20% budget already factored in. An LCS-25 will output a 20 amp pilot signal and therefore any connected vehicle should abide by that 20A limit, even though the unit itself will most likely be connected to a 30A breaker. An HCS-40 will output a 32A pilot signal, and should have a 40 amp breaker, not 50! Connecting an HCS-40 to a 50 or 60 amp breaker is an easy fail from an electrical inspector since it contradicts the manufacturer's instructions. Upsizing the wire is OK.

Obviously the exact requirements vary for each specific EVSE. An 80 amp Tesla HPWC will require 100A wiring and breaker.
 

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Circuits that use a continuous load (like an EVSE) require breakers sized so that the load is 80% of the breaker rating. For example, a 40 amp continuous load requires a 50 amp breaker. Therefore a 30 amp breaker can only supply a 24 amp load.
 

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The EVSE and car negotiate the max draw (amps) and don't exceed it.

I have been using a 40-amp GE with a '13 Volt and a '14 ELR for four years. Zero issues.
The car will only draw what the on-board charger will consume even if the EVSE can produce more. The volt gen1 only draws 13.3amps @240vac or 3.3KW. The EVSE tells the car how much current it can deliver by adjusting the pilot signal pulse width. Both the '14 ELR and '13 volt only draw 3.3KW (13.3A) these are same on-board charger. Your EVSE was never delivering it's max amperage.
 

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What 10%? There is a 20% budget already factored in. An LCS-25 will output a 20 amp pilot signal and therefore any connected vehicle should abide by that 20A limit, even though the unit itself will most likely be connected to a 30A breaker. An HCS-40 will output a 32A pilot signal, and should have a 40 amp breaker, not 50! Connecting an HCS-40 to a 50 or 60 amp breaker is an easy fail from an electrical inspector since it contradicts the manufacturer's instructions. Upsizing the wire is OK.

Obviously the exact requirements vary for each specific EVSE. An 80 amp Tesla HPWC will require 100A wiring and breaker.
Maybe we do things a bit differently down in the lower 48. I have a CC LCS-20P that has a NEMA 14-50 plug that is plugged into a dedicated 240VAC 50 amp branch circuit. My circuit was installed by a master electrician, the same electrician who installed my new service panel several years ago when I replaced an old fuse panel and also upgraded my home electrical service to 200 amps.

Before performing the work for the dedicated circuit my electrician had me send him a photo of the manufacturer's label that is on the side of the LCS-20P. The label states "50 Amp branch circuit protector" and "Input/Output 208-240 VAC 60Hz 120V to ground 16A continuous. Short Circuit Rating 2000 RMS symmetrical amps at 240 VAC." The electrician pulled a permit for the needed work and contacted me when he was ready to perform the work.

Once the job was completed I scheduled an inspection with the county where I live. I was present for the inspection. The county inspector did not check the label on the EVSE, the inspector unplugged the EVSE and inspected the wiring inside the outlet box at the NEMA 14-50 receptacle and also inside the electrical service panel. My circuit was approved.
 

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I have a CC LCS-20P that has a NEMA 14-50 plug that is plugged into a dedicated 240VAC 50 amp branch circuit.
The LCS-20P comes with the 50A plug installed and is specifically allowed on a 50A circuit in the instructions. If it came with a 30A plug it would only be allowed on a 30A circuit even though it's the exact same unit. See the chart on Page 21: https://clippercreek.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/LCS-User-Manual-042112016.pdf

As I stated, an LCS-25 is explicitly instructed to use a 25A breaker, though since that is an uncommon size the electrical code allows a 30A breaker to be used instead. Failure to follow the manufacturer's instructions is an easy fail from an electrical inspector.
 

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The LCS-20P comes with the 50A plug installed and is specifically allowed on a 50A circuit in the instructions. If it came with a 30A plug it would only be allowed on a 30A circuit even though it's the exact same unit. See the chart on Page 21: https://clippercreek.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/LCS-User-Manual-042112016.pdf

As I stated, an LCS-25 is explicitly instructed to use a 25A breaker, though since that is an uncommon size the electrical code allows a 30A breaker to be used instead. Failure to follow the manufacturer's instructions is an easy fail from an electrical inspector.
Thank you for your explanation. In the LCS Series User Manual, page 10, the LCS-25 EVSE you are referring to is the hardwired version of the LCS-25 series. The manufacturer specifies a circuit breaker rating of 25A. As with the LCS-20 series that I have installed at my home, the LCS-25 can also be ordered as an LCS-25P version with either L6-30P or 14-30P plug (circuit breaker rating of 30A) or with either 6-50P or 14-50P plug (circuit breaker rating of 50A.) So if, for example, someone is planning to purchase an LCS-25P with a 14-50 plug the proper circuit breaker that should be installed in the panel for the circuit is 50A whereas for the hardwired version of the LCS-25 (same unit without the plug) the correct circuit breaker is 25A.
 

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Breaker size has nothing to do with electrical inspection failure.

Assuming your 50 amp breaker is properly installed, with the proper gauge wiring given the length of the run, it doesn't matter what size load is on the other end using that circuit as long as it's maximum draw is 80% or less of 50 amps.

If your going to have to run a new circuit for a EVSE install it would be wise to oversize the circuit to allow room for a more powerful EVSE. Say for instance a Tesla.

Regardless of the 220V EVSE used, the Volt will only draw about 16 amps.
 

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Breaker size has nothing to do with electrical inspection failure.

Assuming your 50 amp breaker is properly installed, with the proper gauge wiring given the length of the run, it doesn't matter what size load is on the other end using that circuit as long as it's maximum draw is 80% or less of 50 amps.

If your going to have to run a new circuit for a EVSE install it would be wise to oversize the circuit to allow room for a more powerful EVSE. Say for instance a Tesla.
Costs for installs above 40A really go up. Plus running that fat wire may require some serious drilling. I'm happy with my 6-50 plug on a 40A breaker. That allows for a 32A EVSE which is enough even for home charging a Tesla.
 
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