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2nd Generation Volt to be Supercharger Capable?

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Wouldn't it be great if GM partnered with Tesla to expand the use of Supercharger technology? Imagine charging in a few minutes using Superchargers with the next generation Chevrolet Volt that has a larger battery.

GM could use the Tesla Motors adapter too, and make a converter available for those with J1772 EVSEs at home like one of the ClipperCreek models.
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The Volt does not need supercharger technology. The Volt has a range extender engine that eliminates the need for rapid charging on long trips.

Supercharger technology is appropriate for BEV's but not needed for EREV's.
 

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We now have 3 DC charging interface "standards". One used only by Tesla, and 2 that are used by all the other plug-in vehicle manufacturers. Only pure BEV makers really care at all about a DC "supercharger", otherwise J1772 L1 & L2 work just fine. My bet is that Tesla will be going it alone for as far as we can visualize.

Personally, 3 years & 8 months of L1 (12A) charging has served me just fine. 99.999% of all my charging has happened in my garage.

VIN # B0985
 

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The Volt does not need supercharger technology. The Volt has a range extender engine that eliminates the need for rapid charging on long trips.

Supercharger technology is appropriate for BEV's but not needed for EREV's.
I agree that it is not needed on a PHEV and I probably wouldn't purchase that option on a PHEV. However, there are at least two PHEVs on the market now that support DC fast charge. The BMW i3 Rex and the Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV.
 

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Apart from the fact that Tesla simply wouldn't want to give a competitor a leg up like that, and GM wouldn't want to commit to a non-standard charging spec/adapter...

Ultra-high charge rates simply don't make sense for an EREV like the Volt. First of all, it's not needed for utility. (You can already drive long distances quickly and conveniently on gas.) And, second, with a smaller battery pack, a Volt's battery cells wouldn't be able to handle the high amounts of power that a 60 or 85 kWh battery pack could have without degrading the cells.

However, for the much-anticipated and as-of-yet unnamed 200 mile EV that GM is rumored to be making, quick charging capability could be a huge deal. But, still, I agree with telveer, that it would be better if "we" could get started on a rival network of quick chargers that would be non-proprietary and open to anyone, rather than try to piggy-back on Tesla's proprietary system. But without the proper incentives, such a network may be very slow to develop. So I worry it may not happen for a long time.
 

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If GM brings a BEV to market than super fast charging is a must. But why limit yourselve to the 100+ Tesla SC's when GM could easily install they network on over 4000 GM dealerships. Many advantages aside from the sheer number and lower costs the big one for me would they would be on "private property" and most likely not subject from being "ICE'd". Just visit the Tesla Forum and read the posts on being "ICE'd" by a guest at the property it's installed on ie hotels, malls, public parking garages etc.

I love Tesla but if GM is serious they will need to think outside the box yet take advantage of the strengths they already have.
 

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GM could easily install they network on over 4000 GM dealerships. Many advantages aside from the sheer number and lower costs the big one for me would they would be on "private property" and most likely not subject from being "ICE'd".
GM does not "own" the GM dealerships any more than a shopping mall. GM dealerships are independently owned and operated.

Nor are dealerships always located in convenient areas for charging. For example dealerships are often not located near shopping or restaurant locations.

Frankly... The whole point for eh Volt is that I don't have to stop anywhere but my own garage to charge. I simply don't need fast charging capability because the Volt has a range extender for the rare occurrences I need more range.
 

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DCFC would be cool, but not cost-effective. When discussing the plans for changes in the Gen 2 Volt, Volt chief engineer Andrew Farah said in the fall of 2012 that faster charging rates were a relatively low priority for most Gen 1 Volt owners and may not be a factor in the new Volt. It costs some $$$ to build in the special power electronics and wiring to manage fast charge DC battery charging.

The $ are better spent improving EV range, gas mpg, adding a 5th seat, and achieving more effective and power-efficient winter heating without the engine running.
 

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GM does not "own" the GM dealerships any more than a shopping mall. GM dealerships are independently owned and operated.

Nor are dealerships always located in convenient areas for charging. For example dealerships are often not located near shopping or restaurant locations.

Frankly... The whole point for eh Volt is that I don't have to stop anywhere but my own garage to charge. I simply don't need fast charging capability because the Volt has a range extender for the rare occurrences I need more range.
Nor are they all supportive of GM EVs at all. Just ask Raymond.
 

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I agree with many of the others here, that fast charging just isn't needed for PHEV.

As for GM putting fast chargers at dealerships, head over to the Leaf forums (http://www.mynissanleaf.com/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=11426) and see how well that is working for Nissan.
Spots are often ICEd, often out of order, sometimes not accessible outside of dealer hours.

Tesla has opened their patents and offered to share their SC network with anyone that will help build it out.
It is the fastest (135kW), easiest for customers to use, reliable, and quickest growing network.

Sure, any of the others could start from scratch to build a slower network, but why when one already exists?
 

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I have to agree that superfast charging is nearly irrelevent for the Volt or any EREV.

I do have an L2 EVSE at home and have made use of that rate of charging. It is nice to make my daily commute, come and charge for a couple of hours and head back out later that evening without having to resort to gas. That said, most of the time, overnight charging is just fine, even at L1 EVSE rate.

Even if there was a supercharger network available, I believe I would actually prefer to find any old gas station to give me more range in a few minutes instead of searching for a fast charger and spending more time to "fuel up".

If I had a BEV (like a Tesla), it would be a different story. For an EREV, superfast charging is not important at all.
 

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While the Supercharger has some advantages, I did rather see wider adoption of a non-proprietary industry standard like SAE J1772 COMBO.
I second this motion, the plug in car industry needs common open charging equipment standards. Tesla has already said that they will only allow use of their supercharger communication scheme by organizations who promise that no Tesla owner will ever have to pay for the energy that they consume. Sorry, but that's environmentally unsound position that will encourage inefficient behaviors.
 

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I agree with most of the comments that DC fast charging/Tesla type super charging is not really needed for the Volt.

I DO think, though, that faster charging, even if only 6.6 kW charge rates, would be really useful for a substantial portion of the Volt buying public. I frequently drive 60 or 70 miles and being able to get 20 miles per hour of charging while taking a lunch break (instead of the current 10-11 with the 3.3 kW charge rate) would really make a difference. It would also make using public charging stations that charge by the minute make a lot more sense than they do now.

Is it a make or break item like more AER, lower MSRP or roomier back seats/seating for 5? Probably not. But it would help me decide on a Volt when my current lease runs out in 2016, instead of another plug in choice. Heck make it an option, I would pay $500 to get it, maybe more, and it would cost GM a lot less than that to do the upgrade.
 

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The Volt does not need supercharger technology. The Volt has a range extender engine that eliminates the need for rapid charging on long trips.

Supercharger technology is appropriate for BEV's but not needed for EREV's.
Perhaps not But 6.6 L2 J1772 would be nice and would allow sub 2 hr. turn around times when opportunity charging in the wild.
 

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Good point on the dealerships but far less likely of being ICE'd. than Tesla's solution/plan. And I was refering to a BEV not an EREV. A Volt as you rightly point out doesn't need charging like Tesla's SC.
 

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I agree with most of the comments that DC fast charging/Tesla type super charging is not really needed for the Volt.

I DO think, though, that faster charging, even if only 6.6 kW charge rates, would be really useful for a substantial portion of the Volt buying public. I frequently drive 60 or 70 miles and being able to get 20 miles per hour of charging while taking a lunch break (instead of the current 10-11 with the 3.3 kW charge rate) would really make a difference. It would also make using public charging stations that charge by the minute make a lot more sense than they do now.

Is it a make or break item like more AER, lower MSRP or roomier back seats/seating for 5? Probably not. But it would help me decide on a Volt when my current lease runs out in 2016, instead of another plug in choice. Heck make it an option, I would pay $500 to get it, maybe more, and it would cost GM a lot less than that to do the upgrade.
Add me to that list, I agree 100% As stated above 6.6 L2 would add more of a good thing to an already Pretty darn good package that is the Volt, for all the reasons mentioned "especially opportunity charging at public chargers that employ an hourly rate" which economically are currently useless with the Volts 3.3 kwh rate.
 

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The Volt already has a wonderful supercharger network in the USA: 114,533 retail gas stations. Supercharging a Volt 200 miles takes less than 2 minutes, vs 30 minutes in an electric supercharger.

That is the entire point of the Voltec drive train: to get rid of the hassle and range anxiety disadvantages of EV driving.
 

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Personally, 3 years & 8 months of L1 (12A) charging has served me just fine. 99.999% of all my charging has happened in my garage.

VIN # B0985
I charge with L2 at home and L1 at work. You have me beat by about a month, but 99.999% of my charging has been at those 2 sources as well. And I am running at 90+% on electricity. So I really don't care about DC charging. That's why I drive a Volt after all.
 
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