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Not to bad as a DD in southern Illinois. And the great thing is I have ONE more payment on it. OH and aside from the THREE RECALL's all done on the same trip to my dealer for it's first oil change/tire rotation I have had ZERO issues or need for any warranty work. It's been BULLET PROOF.

Just thought I'd share my ownership experience.
 

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Does the Volt actually display total engine and electric miles? Would like to know this on one I'm looking at buying.
 

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Well , now we know who it was that drained the gas out of a Volt before the BIG BURN :)

I failed as I could not find 4 other Aggies to roll by Volt over to the side.
 

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Well , now we know who it was that drained the gas out of a Volt before the BIG BURN :)

I failed as I could not find 4 other Aggies to roll by Volt over to the side.
About 215 of my 457 ICE miles were done under duress aka the FMM. I asked my dealer not to fill the tank during PDI but the porter didn't get the word and was at the gas station filling the tank when we learned this and luckily when we called him he answered his cell and stopped after adding 6 gallons to the tank. I figure it was delivered with 7.5 gallons of gas. I drove that to ZERO and show the screen shots of how the car responded when the tank ran dry. That was just for fun, some members didn't think it was funny. Now I keep no more than 2 gallons sloshing around. Have had a mild winter so far, temps have not dipped below 16 degrees do no ERDTT so far. Knock on wood. I may escape 2018 looking at our weather forecast.
 

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Indeed, impressive!

I am at the other end of the spectrum. My Volt has been driven for 3 1/2 years (bought new in June, 2015 from my dealer with 20 miles on the odometer). I've got 90,333 miles on the odometer, 75% of which has been using the ICE generator. Because the Volt is such an enjoyable car to drive, and is such a road car, I've made 5 trips across the country and 6 trips to Florida and Missouri. I've changed the oil and filter 4 times, one of them paid for by GM. In the interest of protecting the transmission (so many hours of driving at highway speeds with oil temps in the 190 to 210 F range) I had the transmission oil replaced at 54,000 miles.

Due to my wanderlust and relatively mild winters on Long Island, I've never experienced FMM and maybe one or two ERDTT (temperature set at 15F) .:) The car has been trouble-free. I've been to the dealer for three visits (for the free oil and filter change, the transmission fluid change and a state inspection). I believe that this Volt will be my last car, now that GM has plans to kill the marque.

Oh, I see that another transmission oil change is now due and also the engine air filter again. I've replaced the cabin air filter twice.
 

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Indeed, impressive!

I am at the other end of the spectrum. My Volt has been driven for 3 1/2 years (bought new in June, 2015 from my dealer with 20 miles on the odometer). I've got 90,333 miles on the odometer, 75% of which has been using the ICE generator. Because the Volt is such an enjoyable car to drive, and is such a road car, I've made 5 trips across the country and 6 trips to Florida and Missouri. I've changed the oil and filter 4 times, one of them paid for by GM. In the interest of protecting the transmission (so many hours of driving at highway speeds with oil temps in the 190 to 210 F range) I had the transmission oil replaced at 54,000 miles.

Due to my wanderlust and relatively mild winters on Long Island, I've never experienced FMM and maybe one or two ERDTT (temperature set at 15F) .:) The car has been trouble-free. I've been to the dealer for three visits (for the free oil and filter change, the transmission fluid change and a state inspection). I believe that this Volt will be my last car, now that GM has plans to kill the marque.

Oh, I see that another transmission oil change is now due and also the engine air filter again. I've replaced the cabin air filter twice.
This Jonathan is at 72% electric on our one year old 2018, so about opposite of you. We just don't do road trips much anymore, and mostly fly.

That ICE in your gen1 is a good engine. That's what is in my 2011 Cruze, in turbocharged form. A bit heavy with a cast iron block but robust, and should serve you well for many more miles. It's nice that GM saw fit to use an ordinary car engine and not some dinky thing like in the BMW i3rex.

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 

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nice graphic. nice to see that you are still enjoyingy your 3rd volt experience. I have 105K miles on mine after5 plus years and it is still a GREAT car.
no more 'vette?
Paul
My 2014 Stingray was my last ICE performance car. Time marches on..... and I owned 7 vette's since 1972.
 

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Does the Volt actually display total engine and electric miles? Would like to know this on one I'm looking at buying.
Bump my.Winston as my posts are finally clearing moderation..
 

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Does the Volt actually display total engine and electric miles? Would like to know this on one I'm looking at buying.
The overall lifetime MPG (gas MPG) gets displayed on the energy screen as you scroll through the options, but if it has a decent amount of EV miles, it'll just show 250+ MPG.

On the Chevrolet Onstar app it'll break down total EV vs. gas miles, but I'm not aware of a way to pull that up just inside the car.
 

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If you pull up the energy screen on a Gen 2 and click the MPG box, it will show you your MPGe. Below that is a number for the Lifetime combined MPGe. You can get a rough idea on the ratio based on that number, as gas gets you about 40-45 MPGe and electric gets you 100-110 MPGe. You do have to adjust a bit because a gallon-equivalent of electricity will take you more than twice as far as a gallon of gas will, so gas miles tend to have a psychologically disproportionate impact on the combined MPGe.

As a rough estimate, I'd say 90+ lifetime MPGe reflects 90%+ electric usage. 70 MPGe reflects ~70% electric usage. 60-65 MPGe is about 50/50.

On another note, people seem to really focus on this and I don't know why. If you plan to really utilize the battery, I'd think something that's been driven mostly on gas would be the desired car, as the battery has fewer charge cycles on it and thus is less likely to experience early range degradation. Even on the ICE, the Volt tends to run at RPMs way below what you'd get on a conventional car, so the chance that anything is wrong with a 2-3 year old modern 4 cylinder is remote.
 

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The overall lifetime MPG (gas MPG) gets displayed on the energy screen as you scroll through the options, but if it has a decent amount of EV miles, it'll just show 250+ MPG.

On the Chevrolet Onstar app it'll break down total EV vs. gas miles, but I'm not aware of a way to pull that up just inside the car.
Math gets you close. Odometer miles * EPA MPG / Lifetime MPG = Gas Miles; Odometer miles - gas miles = EV miles. If your lifetime is 250+ and renders math unreliable, your gas miles is little enough that you can treat it as nothing anyway so don't even worry about it.
 

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If you pull up the energy screen on a Gen 2 and click the MPG box, it will show you your MPGe. Below that is a number for the Lifetime combined MPGe. You can get a rough idea on the ratio based on that number, as gas gets you about 40-45 MPGe and electric gets you 100-110 MPGe. You do have to adjust a bit because a gallon-equivalent of electricity will take you more than twice as far as a gallon of gas will, so gas miles tend to have a psychologically disproportionate impact on the combined MPGe.

As a rough estimate, I'd say 90+ lifetime MPGe reflects 90%+ electric usage. 70 MPGe reflects ~70% electric usage. 60-65 MPGe is about 50/50.

On another note, people seem to really focus on this and I don't know why. If you plan to really utilize the battery, I'd think something that's been driven mostly on gas would be the desired car, as the battery has fewer charge cycles on it and thus is less likely to experience early range degradation. Even on the ICE, the Volt tends to run at RPMs way below what you'd get on a conventional car, so the chance that anything is wrong with a 2-3 year old modern 4 cylinder is remote.
This doesn't really hold true in a cold climate or if someone has preconditioned much off the battery, as your MPGe on pure electric will hover in the 70-90 range when cold and using the heater.

I think my lifetime MPGe in my car is in the low 80's, but I'm at 95%+ EV miles.

In a warmer climate, what you're saying will be closer to the truth.
 

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Math gets you close. Odometer miles * EPA MPG / Lifetime MPG = Gas Miles; Odometer miles - gas miles = EV miles. If your lifetime is 250+ and renders math unreliable, your gas miles is little enough that you can treat it as nothing anyway so don't even worry about it.
True. I am in the camp that I think it's silly to worry about ICE usage in a Volt unless it's obviously been used 80+% of the driving which is rare for a private owner car. The miles on the ICE are really inconsequential in almost all cases.
 

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On my Volt I just got with 25k miles. I divided to EPA miles by lifetime miles and multiplied that by total miles to estimate engine miles. (42/ 134)= .313 X 25000= ~8000 engine miles.
 
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