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240V Charging for 2013 Chevy Volt: only 13.2 Amps?

1844 Views 21 Replies 11 Participants Last post by  Billr580
Hello Folks,

I own a 2013 Chevy Volt Premier. Have owned it since 2015, and it only has abou 45,000 miles on the odometer.

Always used the 120V Level 1 charger that came along with the vehicle. But recently I installed 32 Amps Level 2 Charger in my garage and, as expected, it charges the Volt much faster than the one that came with the vehicle, but it seems to only feed up to 13.2Amps to the Volt. Is that a limitation of the Chevy Volt itself (that internally does the conversion from AC to DC) or is the new charger defective?
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It may be 13.2Amps, but that is one each of the "legs". … Using 110v at High pulled over 16amps 110V and burnt up my GFI outlet.
I know the math comes out the same, but that’s not what’s happening. The neutral isn’t wired into a level-2 EVSE. There aren’t two legs sending current to a neutral. The current going into one side is just coming out the other side (opposite phase). It really is 13.x amps at 240+ volts and not twice 13.x at 120v.

And if your EVSE & car was pulling more than 12-amps from a 120v circuit, something was broken. It should never do that.

Barry
 

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… but it seems to only feed up to 13.2Amps to the Volt. Is that a limitation of the Chevy Volt itself (that internally does the conversion from AC to DC) or is the new charger defective?
I’m going to kinda disagree with everyone else. I don’t think 13.2 is normal unless your voltage is very high. So first we need to know the voltage. Second, we don’t need to trust that 13.2 number as gospel. Are you reading it off the EVSE screen? Put a real amp meter (and volt meter) on it. If you have an OBD adapter, read out what the car sees as the input voltage and current. You should be seeing about 20% more than 3300 watts going in.
Barry
 

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Correct about the neutral and the current, but not quite right... There is only a single phase in residential service, so the current is not coming out the other side phase (opposite phase). The transformer winding feeding the service at a house has a grounded center tap that splits the 240V. The two hots coming into the house are the same phase, but current is flowing in opposite directions at any instant in time.
We’re using the word “phase” in different ways. I know what you’re saying. When I look at current on an oscilloscope and one signal has its peak of amplitude when the other signal has its valley, those two signals are “out of phase”. Enginerring speak vs electrician speak.


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