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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Hi, sorry if I am not in the right area, as I just purchased our volt less than two months ago.

When we picked up our volt it was charged to 47 miles. The salesman said that probably wasn't fully charged. After charging it a few times, it has never fully charged beyond 47 miles.

This last time we left it plugged in for a week while we were away expecting to come back and see it fully charged to 53, but alas it was at 47.

Its frustrating because that's almost 10% of the mileage lost. Its like buying a new cell phone and it only charges to 90%.

Is this common, or is there something that we should be looking at?

Any assistance would be appreciated.

Rob
 

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The GOM (Guess O Meter) will reflect the mileage based on temperature and your driving style not on how long you leave it charging as long as the green light on the dash is solid or it says fully charged.
If you have a heavy foot (it is fun though) then the GOM will suggest a lower mileage. If it is cold then it goes lower. Where I am my BEST in winter rate is about 33 miles or less. In summer it is about 65-70 miles.
 

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47 isn't a hard and fast number. The car will calculate the estimated range based on a number of factors. How you drive it will affect it. The temperature outside will affect it (because the heater will use some of the battery capacity).

How many miles does it have on it? How was it driven on test drives? *Probably not too nicely*

As you put more miles on the range will adjust to your style and you should get 53+. It will drop in the winter, and 10% is quite reasonable and depends on the climate you live in.
 

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Don't worry, be happy. As stated 47, 53 or 60+ is just an estimate based on the driving history, temperature and recent driving patterns. If you start driving with a fully charged battery, when the battery has been fully depleted the Energy Information Screen in the center console will show 14.1 - 14.3 kWh having been used. That is the usable part of the Volt's 18.4kWh battery.
 

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The salesman said that probably wasn't fully charged.
... you may have picked up that the salesmen know nothing about these cars. :)

There are a lot of factors that impact the mileage of the car. If you read through the owners manual, cover to cover, that will help understand a lot. (Owning this car is more like owning an electronic device vs. a car.) If you drive with a light foot, the GOM should reward you with a "60" when the weather gets just right. (Not too hot, and not too cold.)
 

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The key is to look at the kWh used on the after you have used a single complete charge. It should be around 14.0. It's usually 14.1, and can get as high as 14.3 if you drive a route that allows you to efficiently use regenerative braking or mountain mode.

Considering the time of year, 47 or lower for EV range is not unusual when you're driving in 40 degree or lower temperatures, using the heat, doing a lot of 60+ mph highway driving, and haven't pumped the tires to 39 psi or more. The biggest impact in the list above is from heat use and outdoor temperature below 40 degrees.

Having bought two months ago, it's not surprising that you're around 47 for the late fall/winter months. In my experience, 53 is something like an average of what you can expect to get over the course of the year. In April-June I got about 60 miles per charge, in July-August I got around 53 because I was using the AC more. In Sept-October I got about 57-58 because it was more temperate/less AC usage. In November, December and January, it's dropped to 42-48 depending on how cold it was and how much I used the heat.

Throughout all of these periods, my Energy screen has consistently registered 14.1-14.2 kWh used per charge, so I know my battery still stores the same amount of energy, but the reported range is affected by all the factors listed above.
 

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You must remember that not all miles are equal. 47 miles at 70 MPH uses more energy than 47 miles at 40 MPH. When the temperature drops, more energy is used to keep the battery or you in the cabin warm.
 

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I've found that your energy score screen can be a pretty reliable predictor of your "full" range. If my score (driving, terrain, HVAC, and temperature) is exactly zero, then I find that my range (miles driven + miles left on the GOM) = exactly 53. As my score goes negative, my range goes below 53. As my score goes positive, my range goes above 53.

In the winter when the temperature drops, and you are using some heat, it's just about impossible to drive so gently to make up for those subtractions from your score. Now if you are driving down a very long hill, you might get your score close to zero and your range back to 53. Off course you eventually have to go back up that hill.
 

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That number is not a FIRM/FIXED value. Its a guess based on your past driving, you can make that number go UP or DOWN based on the THREE T's - Temperature, Terrain and Technique.

Here in southern Illinois aka flat land USA with an average annual temp range and not a lot of highway travel my 2017 Volts GOM reads from a low of 45 miles in the winter to 60+ in the spring/summer and early fall.

There is nothing wrong with your Volt.
 
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