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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
New to the forum but I am seriously considering a used Chevy volt Gen 2.
I would like some advice as to whether this is a good choice.
I commute 200km per day on secondary hwys. 100km to work and 100km home. Usually traveling 90 to 95 km per hour. Mix of hills and flat terrain.. I currently drive a Mazda 3 and spend about $450 per month on gas.
I can charge at home over night on 120v and probably charge for about 9 hours at work on 120v.
Would the Chevy volt make a good choice for a vehicle in this scenario. How many km of electric range would I gain with a 9 hour charge at 120v during the day at work.
If my calculations are right at 8.5 cents a kwh to charge at home it should cost about $1.25 per day to charge at home with free charging at work. I might end up using the gas motor for 20 to 30km per day which would save me $350ish a month in gas. Which would basically cover the payments on a used volt
Does this sound correct or am I missing something.
Any advice for this scenario from volt owners would be appreciated.
Thanks
 

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I own 2 gen 2 Volts (a '16 and a '17). I think your expected electric miles are on the high side. The rated 53 miles (85 km) assumes lower speed driving mixed in, which lessens wind resistance.

In 9 hours at 12 amps, depending on the outside temperature you can probably add 45 km, based roughly on my own job (my main work has free level 2 charging, the other lets me plug into block heater outlets). Someone can correct me if that's way off.

How well maintained are your roads? Snow in the winter? I ask because the one issue I've had has been snow and ice getting on top of the belly pan. On the '17 it just took out one section of the plastic pan, but on the '16 it formed an Ice sheet that took out my AC low pressure sensor. If your roads are plowed more often than mine, shouldn't be an issue.
172451

(Trucks and SUVs were getting stuck in that storm. The little Volt did as well as a FWD car will.)

So, you might do more gas miles than you might think, but they're quite efficient gas miles. My commute is around 100km per day (which I cover 100% on electric except below -10 C), and my savings over my old Colorado I peg at $200-300 per month. The gap between your Mazda would be less, but you're driving twice as much.

Personally I like the Volts and wouldn't hesitate to replace with another one. I would test drive one, see if they'll let you keep it for a bit and see how it performs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for your input. I would only be doing this commute between April and October. My wife would be using it in the winter for a much shorter commute that would be all electric range.
Based on the info you provided I still think my savings would be substantial especially figuring I need to do an oil change about once per month with the mileage I am putting on. And I am filling up every 2nd or 3rd day. The volt should extend my time between fill ups which would be nice as well.
 

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You may have found this already, but for 2016-2018 Volts, ERDTT (engine running due to temperature) kicks in at -10 C (if deferred). It doesn't burn much (ICE cycles on and off to heat coolant), but it is an annoyance on very short trips. The 2019 model let's you defer to -19 C, I believe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Is it heating coolant for cabin temperature or battery warming, or both?
What is the annoyance in the ice turning on under these conditions?
 

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Is it heating coolant for cabin temperature or battery warming, or both?
What is the annoyance in the ice turning on under these conditions?
It's meant for the cabin/windows even if not needed. It's only a (mental) annoyance when it kicks in on a short trip when you have plenty of battery power. I have added a defeat to my 2011 that prevents it from kicking in as my trips tend to be shorter in the Volt. For mid-range trips we use the Bolt EV. With plugging in at both ends, you could use a Bolt, but a Volt will give you more peace of mind in case there is a charging issue at home or work plus winter.
 
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You might also consider a Prius Prime. Not as much range, but far higher fuel (gasoline) economy at highway speeds. Just a second option to your analysis.
 

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You might also consider a Prius Prime. Not as much range, but far higher fuel (gasoline) economy at highway speeds. Just a second option to your analysis.
At the distances under consideration (200km per day), the Prime won't be saving a whole lot of fuel, unless there's a lot of very short trips on weekends that we're not aware of. It could easily be 6-7 years before the fuel savings from plugging in reaches the price difference between the Prime and the regular Prius running that far per day, and even a regular Prius will use about half the fuel that the Mazda 3 does.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You might also consider a Prius Prime. Not as much range, but far higher fuel (gasoline) economy at highway speeds. Just a second option to your analysis.
I have looked at the prius. I do like Toyota reliability, but compared to the volt it seems kind of like a boring car with good economy, while the volt appears to be much more fun to drive. I also like the fact the volt has a much longer all electric range.
 

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I have looked at the prius. I do like Toyota reliability, but compared to the volt it seems kind of like a boring car with good economy, while the volt appears to be much more fun to drive. I also like the fact the volt has a much longer all electric range.
I have a 2015 Prius (not prime) and just bought a 2019 Volt. Understand, I do like the Prius, but you are right. It's a little more boring, a good bit more sluggish, doesn't drive or ride as good as the Volt. I have the Prius for sale but still driving it some in the meantime.
So yesterday I take the Volt on a 50 mile each way trip, used the battery until I got to the highway, then put it in hold mode and reset the trip odometer. My speed was between 60 and 65 most of the way (it wasn't a super highway like I95). On gas the car averaged about 46-47 mpg which is only 7-8 mpg less than the Prius. Throw in the battery miles and I'm thinking it's about equal (although the electricity isn't free). So in my mind, unless I go much more than 100 miles the cost for "fuel" is about the same as the Prius. But with the Volt you're getting a much better car, IMO. I also believe that the Volt will be more reliable in the long run, many of the gen3 prius (2010 -2015) are having head gasket issues due to the exhaust gas recirculation (egr) clogging. From everything I've read and heard about the volt, it is less likely to have any similar major issues
 

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Why don't you get a used Chevy Bolt instead of the Volt. That way you can drive your whole commute on electric and save even more money. It should cost you about $3 per day or $90 per month for your commute and electric rate. You will need to get a 240V outlet if you want to be able to recharge it completely overnight.
 

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My commute is 100 miles (160km) per day. I charge with a Level 2 EVSE at home and Level 1 EVSE at work. It's location set to 12 amps.
I work 11 hours per day so I gain about 44 miles of charge at work.
In the winter I would switch to gas engine for about 10 miles each trip to get the coolant warm and keep the cabin comfortable then run electric for the rest of the way.
In February I've only used 5 gallons (18.9L) of gasoline to drive 2000 miles (3218km) so I would say that's it's a significant savings. So far this June I haven't had to use any gasoline at all during my work commute. I drive at 60 MPH (96.5km) on rural highway so my consumption is low for both gasoline and electric. Your mileage may vary 😁
 

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I like my Volt but don't think I'd use it where there was a winter environment. The tires and heating requirement in this environment and the issues that Kato659 mentioned and I'd probably choose a different vehicle unless it was just too good of a deal to refuse. How about a Chevy Cruze Diesel? That would probably get better mileage than the Volt on the highway.
 

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If you only have 120V charging available, forget the Bolt. You'll have a dead car, using more juice than you are able to replace. It takes about 13 hours to charge a Gen 2 from depleted to full on 120V at 12 amps. You'll get only a few more miles on a Bolt at the same rate and time (it's slightly more efficient, electrically). The Bolt will charge enough, overnight, to cover about 1/2 of your commute. Every day will be about a 25% diminished return to zero. Without 240V charging available, at either end, the Bolt is not an option for your need.

Considering the current (and future) cost of fuel, and your current electricity rate, the Volt will be considerable savings over your current Mazda, and still better than a Prius.
 

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I think your level 1 charging numbers are off maybe. if you are charging on a 20amp circuit at work, you can set your volt to charge at 12amps, which will fully recharge a battery in 9.5 hours. At 8amps on a 15amp circuit it's something like 13 hours. Also driving at 65 MPH will yield something like 55miles. or 110Km. That means under optimal conditions on an average day you could make it to work on a full charge, charge, then make it back home under battery. Running AC, cold weather, etc. will change things slightly but not by much. I value my volts 'unlimited range' gas mode as it cuts my range anxiety down to zero. I don't mind at all burning 1/2 gallon of gas daily for the peace of mind it gives me... Figure 1/2 gallon and a 9 gallon tank means filling up every 3 working weeks. If you can safely drop your highway speed down to 62MPH you could almost certainly make it to and from on battery alone.

I also looked at the Prius but the sporty handling of the Volt as well as massive interior space for big guys and large grocery runs were the deciding factors personally.

I think the Gen2 Volt would meet your needs from what you have explained here. 8)
 

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Nope. 12A takes about 13 hours. 8A takes about 19 hours. There is no "20A" option or requirement (the EVSE only requires a 15A, but can use a 20A outlet). A healthy 15A circuit/outlet can sustain a 12A load. My 2017 was charged on level 1 for nearly a year before level 2 was fully available. Been there. Done that.
 

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New to the forum but I am seriously considering a used Chevy volt Gen 2.
I would like some advice as to whether this is a good choice.
I commute 200km per day on secondary hwys. 100km to work and 100km home. Usually traveling 90 to 95 km per hour. Mix of hills and flat terrain.. I currently drive a Mazda 3 and spend about $450 per month on gas.
I can charge at home over night on 120v and probably charge for about 9 hours at work on 120v.
Would the Chevy volt make a good choice for a vehicle in this scenario. How many km of electric range would I gain with a 9 hour charge at 120v during the day at work.
If my calculations are right at 8.5 cents a kwh to charge at home it should cost about $1.25 per day to charge at home with free charging at work. I might end up using the gas motor for 20 to 30km per day which would save me $350ish a month in gas. Which would basically cover the payments on a used volt
Does this sound correct or am I missing something.
Any advice for this scenario from volt owners would be appreciated.
Thanks
Hello, I have a Volt1'2012, and its range is only ± 65 km, for 100 km with a charged battery I use 2.3 liters of gasoline, and the range of an electric car in the battery is still 10 km. Charging speed 65 km / 4.5 hours at 195 V / 12 A. VOLT2 travels 80-100 km on a fully charged battery.

This car delivers excellent driving emotions, dynamics and quietness, handling, and you will like its characteristics even after Mazda (I bought my Volt2012 when I owned an Audi Q5 2.0 - TFSI, and now I don't touch it at all).

Kindest regards, Murad.
 

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I think your level 1 charging numbers are off maybe. if you are charging on a 20amp circuit at work, you can set your volt to charge at 12amps, which will fully recharge a battery in 9.5 hours. At 8amps on a 15amp circuit it's something like 13 hours. Also driving at 65 MPH will yield something like 55miles. or 110Km. That means under optimal conditions on an average day you could make it to work on a full charge, charge, then make it back home under battery. Running AC, cold weather, etc. will change things slightly but not by much. I value my volts 'unlimited range' gas mode as it cuts my range anxiety down to zero. I don't mind at all burning 1/2 gallon of gas daily for the peace of mind it gives me... Figure 1/2 gallon and a 9 gallon tank means filling up every 3 working weeks. If you can safely drop your highway speed down to 62MPH you could almost certainly make it to and from on battery alone.

I also looked at the Prius but the sporty handling of the Volt as well as massive interior space for big guys and large grocery runs were the deciding factors personally.

I think the Gen2 Volt would meet your needs from what you have explained here. 8)
55 miles is not 110 km, more like 88 km… unless you were thinking nautical miles - but then, you should refer to the speed in knots rather than mph :)
 

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55 miles is not 110 km, more like 88 km… unless you were thinking nautical miles - but then, you should refer to the speed in knots rather than mph :)
55 miles is 91.7 Km. We double or half to easily get the conversion but actually the conversion factor is .6.
 
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